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Town of Wilmington 
Massachusetts 



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t^nnual 



eport 





1976 



5n JWemoriam 

Robert E. Barnaby 
Herbert Colby, Jr. 



Index 



Title Page 

Accepted Streets 56 

Beautif ication Committee 33 

Bicentennial Commission 48 

Board of Appeals 61 

Board of Assessors 8 

Board of Health 36 

Board of Registrars 12 

Board of Selectmen 2 

Boards, Committees & Commissions 5 

Carter (Sarah D.J.) Lecture Fund 50 

Cemetery Department 45 

Conservation Commission 28 

Constable 17 

Council on Aging 47 

Directory of Officials 4 

Dog Officer 55 

Fire Department 24 

Highway Department 26 

Historical Commission 34 

Housing Authority 46 

Inspector of Buildings 25 

Jury List 52 

Librarian 20 

Library Trustees 19 

Planning Board 18 

Police Department 22 

Public Buildings Department 35 

Recreation Commission 30 

Redevelopment Authority 51 

Regional Health Center 40 

Revenue Sharing 76 

School Committee 68 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 51 

Shawsheen Valley Technical School 77 

Superintendent of Schools - 71 

Town Accountant 113 

Town Clerk 10 

Town Collector 13 

Town Counsel 14 

Town Engineer 29 

Town Manager 3 

Town Meetings & Elections Annual Town Meeting - February 7, 1976 82 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting - March 13, 1976 83 

Special Town Meeting - July 29, 1976 104 

Presidential Primary - March 2, 1976 102 

State Primary - September 14, 1976 105 

State Election - November 2, 1976 107 

Town Treasurer 9 

Tree Department 27 

Veterans Agent 41 

Water & Sewer Department 42 



1 



Town of Wilmington 
Massachusetts 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the Citizens of Wilmington: 

The Town of Wilmington has just completed a most exciting and productive year, 
a year which witnessed the healthy mingling of the new, the modern, and the 
innovative with the old, the historical, and the traditional. During 1976 
Wilmington joined the rest of the nation in celebrating the 200th anniversary 
of our nation. It was a time of reflection of and commitment to the ideals 
and aspirations of our forefathers. 

During the past year Wilmington took a hard look at itself and realized that 
the qualities that make the Town so uniquely attractive are being acted upon 
by destructive forces. The Local Growth Policy Committee expressed concern 
that Wilmington may be on the road to uncontrolled growth, the kind of growth 
that consumes rather than contributes. 

The past year also saw modernization in Wilmington. The Town initiated a 
successful program of collecting rubbish from each household once a week and 
having it removed to an out-of-town sanitary landfill. The Town moved its 
planned sanitary sewer system into shape for construction to begin in 1977. 

Services to our Senior Citizens were Improved with the initiation of a Hot 
Lunch Program. The Hot Lunch Program expands the numerous areas of co- 
operation and coordination that have developed between the Town government 
and the School Department. 

The continued depressed state of the region's economy has made every Wilmington 
reslden t aware of the need to be realistic in our requests and expectations, and 
an appreciation for the simple things in life has resurfaced. The Selectmen and 
Town government realize that there simply are no more dollars in the pockets of 
our citizens to pay for increased services. To ease the taxpayer's burden, we 
are not initiating new services next year and we are doing what we can to blunt 
the effect of inflation. We are recommending measures that will provide our cur- 
rent services more effectively. The critically important Public Safety function 
can, we feel, be Improved if the function can be made more streamlined. 

After spending a year looking at our past and evaluating our present, we approach 
the future enthusiastically, knowing that there are problems to face, but knowing 
also, that by working together we can solve those problems. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George W. Boylen, Jr., Chairman 
James F. Banda 
Aldo A. Caira 
A. Daniel Glllls 
James R. Miceli 




'FOW iV OF \\l I > iVI I IV O T O M 

MASSACHUSETTS 01887 



office: of the 
town manager 



AREA CODE 617 
658-3311 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Wilmington: 

In 1976, we faced a crucial issue of how to dispose of solid waste while under 
court order to close the former privately owned landfill area in Wilmington. 
After many hours of debate, which extended over two annual town meeting periods, 
we resolved the problem by combining a rubbish and garbage collection system 
available to all residents. Also by a three year contractual arrangement, we 
have stipulated that the refuse so collected would be disposed of outside of the 
limits of the Town. The collection process seems to be working well over the 
first few months of operation. The long range solution will no doubt be a form 
of mutual assistance among municipalities for a more sophisticated waste disposal 
system. 

The release of certain Federal funds this past year under the Water Pollution 
Control Act has caused us to spend a good part of 1976 in refiling our application 
for such funds for the construction of the second phase of the sanitary sewer system. 
In light of the revised grant program, we stand to gain at least two million dollars 
in Federal reimbursement to construct the fourteen miles of sewer. The process of 
qualifying for these funds is tedious at best, and environmental assessments and 
requirements grow as more State and Federal agencies adopt rules and regulations 
under the National Environmental Policy Act. We fortunately ordered the complete 
engineering design of this second phase of the sewer system starting in the middle 
of 1975 from money available from State and Federal reimbursement from Phase 1 of 
the sewer system. This now makes Wilmington eligible for the expected total re- 
imbursement of four million dollars for the new project. 

In our search for supplemental income to ease the local tax burden, we are pleased 
to report that we have received both State and Federal grants on the following 
projects. A State grant from the Massachusetts Secretary of Elder Affairs for 
$2,000, a Federal grant to assist in the town forest land from the Housing and 
Urban Development Agency for $25,000, a Federal grant for a neighborhood Preser- 
vation Program from the Housing and Urban Development Agency for $100,000, and 
we participated in the State Federal employment program under the Comprehensive 
Emplojrment and Training Act from funds received through the United States Depart- 
ment of Labor for the sum of $180,000. 

I wish to acknowledge that the progress which has been made over the past year is 
due to the leadership provided by the Board of Selectmen, and the services have 
been of high quality due to the professional attitude of our department heads and 
hard work by our employees. 

The Town of Wilmington will benefit most of all by your presence at the Town Meeting. 



Respectfully submitted. 




Town Manager 

3 



DIRECTORY OF OFFICIALS - January 1. 1976 - 1977 



Board of Selectmen 



George W. Boylen, Jr., Chairman 
James F. Banda 
Aldo A. Calra 
A. Daniel Gillis 
James R. Miceli 



Town Manager 



Sterling C. Morris 



Moderator 



John M, Callan 



School Committee 



John Brooks, Chairman 



Linda T. McMenimen, Vice Chairman 
Francis A. Ottati, Secretary 
James A. Demos 
David J. Dingle 
Lester F. White 



Arthur F. Spear, Jr., Vice Chairman 
Joyce K. Brisbois, Secretary 
Christian G. Bachman 
Stephen J. Brennick 
Thomas E. Casey 
John C. Clark 
David K. Cronin 
James F. Lancaster 



Superintendent of Schools 



Walter H. Pierce 



Finance Committee 



Richard D. Duggan, Chairman 



4 



BOARDS. COMMITTEES AND COMMISSIONS - JANUARY 1, 1976 - 1977 



U'PEAL, BOARD OF 

Jruce MacDonald, Chairman 

William A. Caperci 

George G. Robertie 

;.ouis J. Brozyna, Associate 

?eter Enos, Associate 

)orothy E. Robbins, Associate 

ASSESSORS, BOARD OF 

Anthony E. Krzeminski, Principal 

Charles P. Lawrenson 

loy P. McClanahan 

3EAUTIFICATI0N COMMITTEE 
'aula O'Brien, Chairman 
velyn S . Burke 
lilda P. Nelson 
iugo Wiberg 



1977 
1979 
1978 
1977 
1977 
1977 



HEALTH, BOARD OF 

Joseph A. Paglia, Chairman 

James J. Durkee 

Thomas W. Morris 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
Adele C. Passmore, Chairman 
Foster B. Balser 
Frank D. Curley 
William G. Meyer 
Melinda P . Murphy 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

George W. Hooper, Chairman 

Lorraine C. Brozyna 

Barbara H. Larson 

Leo M. Woodside 

Lulu E. Sanborn 

(Rep. of State Housing Board) 



ilCENTENNIAL COMMISSION 
ructuoso T. Carrasco, Chairman 
Robert S. Boyce 
(.obert A. Brown 
rohn C. Clark 
itwood E. Dickson 
)avid B. Hill 
;harles Kelley 
Toan Maga 
larie Michaud 

:ARTER LECTURE FUND COMMITTEE 
ladelon C. Slater, Chairman 
fulia Fielding 
lildred E. Neilson 
mne M. Rounds 
Kenneth Wilson 

:EMETERY COMMISSIONERS 
/illiam F. Cavanaugh, Chairman 
Jillis C. Lyford 
filliam H. Russell 

:ONSERVATION COMMISSION 

dice W. Papliolios, Chairman 

foan M. Sadowski, Vice Chairman 

Ihester A. Bruce 

ithlea E. Ingram 

Irsula M. Leahy 

ruce A. Peters 

:OUNCIL ON AGING 



lOrraine Brozyna, Chairman 
ladys A. Babine 
irthur Bernard 
race Bourbeau 
enton P. Cogar, Jr. 
irthur J. Daniels 
ose M. Gatta 
osephine M. Kelley 
ema K. Miller 
'ames Shine 
rving H. Storms 



1979 
1977 
1977 
1979 
1978 



1979 
1978 
1977 



1977 
1977 
1979 
1979 
1978 
1977 



1979 
1978 
1977 
1977 
1979 
1977 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1978 
1979 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 
Lionel M. Baldwin 
Raymond A. McNamara 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES 
E. Hayward Bliss, Chairman 
Philip B. Buzzell 
Shirley F. Callan 

Evelyn M. Norton . _ 

Ro land I -.^-Wood" 7<(< ?^ou4,*^aO»-C»v, , 4h 

Anne Ballou ^ ^ 

PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 
Arthur R. Smith, Jr., Chairman 
Albert J. Blackburn, Jr. 
Joseph J. Hartka 
David A. Holbrook 
Edward E. Thompson 

PERSONNEL ADVISORY BOARD 
Richard V. Barry 
John F. Burke 
Richard K. Hayden 



PLANNING BOARD 

Louis A. Maglio, Jr., Chairman 
John DeRoy 

William G. Hooper, Jr. 
Walter P. Kenney 
Kenneth J. Miller 

RECREATION COMMISSION 
John P. Gushing, Chairman 
Paul J. Bova 
Lorraine M. Hanna 
Larry Noel 
Francis Sferrazza 



5 



REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 
Raymond A. McNamara, Chairman 
Carl A. Backman 
William F. Butt 
Sidney R. Kaizer 

Currie N. Johnson (State Member) 

REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL COMM 
Eugene L. Kritter 
Frank H. McLean 

REGISTRARS, BOARD OF 
Mary G. Condrey, Chairman 
Robert L. Cavanaugh 
Olin M. London 
Esther L. Russell, Clerk 

TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 
Robert P. Palmer 
Kenneth C. Motschmann 
Frank H. Tuttle 

TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 
Harold E. Melzar, Chairman 
Mary E. Denault, Secretary 
Arnold C. Blake 

WATER & SEWER COMMISSIONERS 
George R. Allan, Chairman 
Arnold C. Blake 
Arthur R. Smith, Jr. 

WILMINGTON ELECTIONS OFFICERS 

Precinct 1 
Mary D'Eon, Warden 
Helen F. Sencabaugh, Dep. Warden 
Joan M. Lanzillo, Clerk 
Dianne M. Polizzotti, Dep. Clerk 
Clarice J. Ross, Inspector 
Alta Lyons, Dep. Inspector 
Edith Ann Graham, Inspector 
Dolores E. Romanski, Dep. Inspector 

Precinct 2 
Phyllis M. O'Leary, Warden 
Charlotte Stewart, Dep. Warden 
Evelyn S. Burke, Clerk 
Barbara H. Webber, Dep. Clerk 
Miriam H. Colucci, Inspector 
Lorita B. Bower, Dep. Inspector 
Eleanor Doyle, Inspector 
Henrietta I. Bonnell, Dep. Inspector 

Precinct 3 
Stanley Webber, Warden 
Basil L. Weatherbee, Dep. Warden 
Loretta R. Caira, Clerk 
Anne M. Rounds, Dep. Clerk 
Mary E. Woods, Inspector 
Norinne M. Markey, Dep. Inspector 
Florence A. Balkus, Inspector 
Barbara J. Buck, Dep. Inspector 



Precinct A 

1981 William H. Russell, Warden Annual 

1979 Sarah H. Cosman, Dep. Warden 

1977 Elizabeth Cavanaugh, Clerk " 

1978 Mary H. O'Rourke, Dep. Clerk " 

1979 Doris V. Russell, Inspector " 
Marjorie C. Kennedy, Dep. Inspector " 
Mary J. Johnson, Inspector " 

1977 Edith Cuoco, Dep. Inspector " 

1979 

Precinct 5 

Jean Lefavour, Warden " 

1977 Dora C. Ardolino, Dep. Warden " 
1979 Mildred Hillier, Clerk 

1978 Margaret E. Blonigen, Dep. Clerk " 
Carole A. Bailey, Inspector " 
Elizabeth A. Blaisdell, Dep. Inspector " 
Edith L. Poloian, Inspector " 
Ruth S. Coursey, Dep. Inspector " 

Precinct 6 

Margaret L. Perry, Warden " 

Estelle M. Bulger, Dep. Warden " 

1979 Barbara M. Cook, Clerk 

1978 Nancy C. DeWilde, Dep. Clerk 

1977 Diane H. Ryan, Inspector " 
Patricia D. McNaughton, Dep. Inspector " 
Jean F. Howard, Inspector " 

1978 Elizabeth Andrews, Dep. Inspector " 
1977 

1979 



Annually 



6 



OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS - JANUARY 1, 1976 



- 1977 



xcountant 

tdministrative Assistant 

jiimal Inspector 

ssistant Town Manager 

emetery Superintendent 

ivil Defense Director 

onstable 

log Officer 

;ngineer 

'ire Chief 

as Inspector 

ighway Superintendent 

nspector of Buildings 

pswich River Watershed Commission 

ibrarian 

[edical Agent, Board of Health 

etropolitan Area Planning Council 

[ilk Inspector 

lurse, Public Health 

lumbing Inspector 

ublic Building Superintendent 

'dice Chief 

:ecreation Director 

ealer of Weights and Measures 

own Clerk 

own Clerk (Assistant 

'own Collector 

own Collector (Deputy) 

own Counsel 

own Sanitarian 

own Treasurer 

own Treasurer (Assistant) 

ree and Moth Superintendent 

eterans' Agent 

eterans' Grave Officer 

ater Superintendent 

ire Inspector 



Robert H. Peters 
Mary E. Denault 
Joseph V. Balestrieri 
Peter L. Holzmeister 
Francis E. Downs 
Silverius J. Blonigen 
A. John Imbimbo 
Joseph V. Balestrieri 
Robert L. Higgins 
Arthur J. Boudreau 
William R. Harrison 
Robert P. Palmer 
Charles P. Lawrenson 
Herbert D. Nickerson 
Philip W. Meriam 
Luisito Francisco, M.D. 

Madelyn A. McKie 
Ernest F. Romano 
Anne Butters, R.N. 
William R. Harrison 
Roy P. McClanahan 
Paul J. Lynch 
Ronald Swasey 
Martin P. Farrell 
Esther L. Russell 
Margaret A. Wagstaff 
Marion C. Murphy 
Catherine P. Lindmark 
Alan Altman 
Ernest F. Romano 
Mary E. Denault 
Elizabeth R. Fosgate 
Thomas 0. Sullivan 
Paul A. Farrell 
Paul A. Farrell 
Kenneth C. Motschmann 
Charles L. Webster 




Student Government Day - Student Selectmen at the Selectmen's meeting table 

7 



Board of Assessors 



RECAPITULATION - 1977 FISCAL YEAR 



Total Appropriations (Taxation) 


$ 12,332,740 


00 


Total Appropriations (Available Funds) 


1,151,404 


00 


Total Deficits 


64,030 


33 


School Lunch Program 


41,993 


34 


Free Public Libraries 


6,413 


25 


Special Education Grant - Chapter 766 


26,443 


00 


Audit of Municipal Accounts 


33,075 


04 


Amount Necessary to Satisfy Final Court Judgments 


1,269 


66 


County Retirement Assessment 


310,341 


00 


County Hospital 


4,735 


88 


County Tax 


394,656 


95 


State Recreation Areas 


72,759 


35 


Underestimates 


862 


95 


Metropolitan Districts Area Charge 


149,452 


64 


Underestimates 


4,171 


28 


Mass Bay Transportation Authority 


201,204 


00 


Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Bills 


2,297 


25 


Air Pollution Control Districts 


1,364 


11 


Metropolitan Area Planning Council 


2,534 


21 


Ipswich Water Shed 


2,207 


85 


Overlay of Current Year 


219,597 


50 



$ 13, 484, 144. OC 



Gross Amount to be Raised 



1,539, 409. 5S 
$ 15, 023, 553. 5^ 



Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds : 

1977 Fiscal Year Estimated Receipts from Local Aid & Agency Funds $ 2,771,758.88 

Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 677,539.32 

Licenses 14,000.00 

Fines 5,897.45 

Special Assessments 28,396.75 

General Government 7,640.25 

Protection of Persons and Property 24,298.25 

Health and Sanitation 3,867.00 

Highways 523.25 

Libraries 205.46 

Cemeteries 9,353.40 

Farm Animal and Machinery Excise 436.71 

Interest 128,379.86 

Ambulance Service 4,423.25 

Sewer Revenue 59,856.87 

Workmen's Compensation and Insurance 8,181.65 

Dog License Reimbursement 3,472.56 

Miscellaneous Receipts 862.14 

Overestimates 59,411.05 

Voted from Available Funds 1,151,404.00 
Net Amount to be Raised by Taxation 



4,959,908. IC 
$ 10,063,645.49 



8 



Recapitulation - 



1977 Fiscal Year (continued) 



Personal Property $ 4,962,715.00 (? 68.40 per M $ 339,449.71 

Real Estate $ 142,166,605.00 (? 68.40 per M 9,724il95!78 

Total Levied on Property $ 10 'o63 ^645 . 49 

Items not entering into the determination of the Tax Rate : 

1. Betterments and Special Assessments added to Taxes: 

a. Street Betterment and Interest 12 729.69 

b. Water Betterment and Interest 15 113,29 

c. Sewer Betterment and Interest 11,492.59 

Liens added to Taxes: 

a. Water Liens 25 555.40 

b. Sewer Liens 78.70 

$ 64,969.67 

Total of all other Commitments $ 10,128,615.16 



Town Treasurer 



Cash on hand - July 1, 1975 940,913.66 

Receipts - fiscal 1976 29,779,465.30 

Disbursements - fiscal 1976 28,594,212.04 

Cash on hand - June 30, 1976 2,126,166.92 

'iince March 1974 we have not found it necessary to borrow any money in anticipation of revenue. 
investments : 

|)uring the calendar year 1976, the program of investing idle funds from Bond Issues and General Funds was 
|;ontinued with a resulting profit of $75,755. Interest rates dropped to an average of 5% on investments. 

j'unds received during the year 1976 from the Federal Revenue Sharing program were invested also with a return 
if $9,156. Since the receipt of Federal Revenue Sharing funds, we have earned an additional sum of $110,017 
y investing these funds prior to actual expenditure. 



9 



Town Clerk 



Vital Statistics - Chapter 46, General Laws as amended : 

Births - final figure for 1975 
Births - actually recorded for 1976 

Marriage Intentions recorded for 1976 
Marriages Recorded for 1976 

Deaths Recorded for 1976 



219 
195 

152 
174 

104 



Chapter 46, Section 15 : 

The Town Clerk will furnish to parents, householders, physicians, and registered hospital medical officers 
applying therefor, blanks for the return of births as required by law. 

Chapter 114, Section 45 : 

Seventeen burial permits have been issued by the Town Clerk as Special Agent for the Board of Health in 1976. 
Fourteen out-of-state deaths reported and filed in this office. Fifteen Wilmington Veterans died out of town 
and were buried in Wilmington Cemetery. 

TOWN RECORDS 

Permits and certificates of registration for the storage of inflammables: 

These licenses must be registered by the owner or occupant of the land, or by the holder of the license in tY. 
Town Clerk's office on or before April 30 of each year. Notification will be sent on or about March 15. If 
not registered by law, the license may be revoked by the licensing authority after a public hearing. 



Inflammables 

Uniform Commercial Code recordings 

Uniform Commercial Code terminations 

Federal Tax Lien recordings 

Dog Licenses issued 

Duplicate dog tags sold 

Business Certificates recorded 

Business withdrawals 

Fish & Game Licenses 

Pole Locations 

Medical Registration 

Bazaars and Raffles 



97 
261 
31 

29 
1777 
20 
35 

3 

831 
31 
1 
8 



10 



cher Services : 



Keep minutes of Annual and Special Town Meetings up-to-date. (certify same upon request.) 

Town Clerk has complete charge of elections. Records election results. 

Send State Election results to State Secretary forthwith. 

Keep Jury List up-to-date. Draw jurors when court orders come through. 

Certified an undetermined number of Births, Marriages and Deaths. 

Certified an undertermined number of Births (Abstract forms) - used for school entrance, driver's licenses, 
out-of-state travel and job applications. 

Proof of residence by letter or card - used for college entrances; undetermined number. 
Miscellaneous sales of books and maps - undetermined number. 

Receive writs against the Town and forward copies of same to the Town Counsel. 

Occasionally appear in court for the Town, when summoned - producing all papers and maps required. 
Complete notes of the Town as received from the Town Treasurer - after approval by the Selectmen. Certify 
same . 

Record Board of Appeal decisions. 
Keep a file of decisions by the Town Counsel. 
Record minutes and decisions of the Planning Board. 
Keep a file of Annual Reports. 

Keep a file of all Zoning and Town By-Law changes as approved by the Attorney General. 
Swear Town officers to the faithful performance of their duties and keep a record of same. 
Accept business registrations and keep a file for public use. 

Prepare the Town ballot for the voting machines and order the printing of same. 
Supervise payrolls for town meeting and election workers. 

Supervise the distribution and filing of nomination papers and the reports of campaign and political 
finance expenditures. 

The Town Clerk, in her capacity as a justice of the peace, certified an undetermined number of legal 
papers for town officers. Married couples by appointment, in her home when presented with the proper 
credentials . 

By virtue of her office, the Town Clerk is clerk to the Board of Registrars. In this capacity, I have - 
Met with the Board on regular meetiiigs and special meetings. 
Kept the minutes of the Board up-to-date. 
Supervised the Annual census by mall. 
Kept the voting list up-to-date. 

Registered voters during office hours and met with the board for evening sessions and 
certification of nomination papers. 

Supervised the printing of the "Persons' Listed" book. 




Student Town Officers ■ Being sworn in by the Town Clerl< 



11 



Board of Registrars 



In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3, of the Town By-Laws, meetings of the Board of Registrars were held ij 
the second Monday of each month for the registration of voters and the conduct of business. Under Chapter 6 i 
of the Acts of 1958, this meeting is open to the public and the press, and it is so posted in the Town Hall. | 

The Board has held registration periods as are required by the law for the Annual Town Election and Town Mee > 
ing. There were other registration periods for the July Special Town Meeting and two State Primaries and thi: 
State Election. 

The Town Clerk has attended Massachusetts Town Clerk conferences in order to keep up with the constantly 
changing election laws. 

The 1976 Annual Tovm Census was taken by mail for the first time. This was a reasonably successful venture. 
The Board voted to take the 1977 Annual Town Census jointly with the School Department. 

In order to keep the voting list as up-to-date as possible, the Board annually compares the voting list with 
the annual census. If a voter's name does not appear in the census, it is subject to removal from the votinj 
list. Drop voter letters are sent to these people advising them to get in touch with the Town Clerk. 

New residents are requested to notify the Board of Registrars of the date which they take residence in the 
town. Any change of address within the town during the year should be brought to the attention of the Board 
of Registrars so that your name will not be removed from the voting list inadvertently. 

The year 1976 brought personnel changes. Mr. F. Talbot Emery resigned July 26, 1976, having been on this 
board for thirty-three (33) years. His wise counsel and friendly personality will be missed by those of us 
who have worked with him over the years. Mrs. G. Condrey was voted Chairman and a new member Mr. Olin M. Loi ) 
joined the board. 

1975 State Census (considered 'official') 17,656 

1976 number of dogs listed in the census 2,320 ] 

Registered voters as of January 1, 1976 

Democrats 3446 

Republicans 1044 

Undeclared 3689 

American 4 

Total 8183 I 



12 



Town Collector 



:0MMITM1'NTS 



1976 



i977 - Real Estate 

977 - Apport. Water Betterment 
;oniinitted Interest 
.977 - Apport. Street Betterment 
Committed Interest 

977 - Water Lien 

977 - Apport. Sewer 
;ommitted Interest 

977 - Sewer Lien 

977 - Personal Property 

977 - Farm 

976 - Excise 

975 - Excise 

97A - Excise 

ipport. Water Betterment - Paid in Full 
lommitted Interest 

ipport. Street Betterment - Paid in Full 

lommitted Interest 

Inapport. Street Betterment 

Inapport. Sewer Betterment 

onbulance 

TOTAL COMMITMENTS 

:OLLECTIONS - 1976 

eal Estate $ 
ipport. Water Betterment 

ommitted Interest 
ipport. Street Betterment 

ommitted Interest 
fater Liens 

pport. Sewer Betterment 
ommitted Interest 
ewer Liens 
ersonal Property 
arm 

[otor Vehicle Excise 

pport. Water Betterment - Paid in Full 
ommitted Interest 

pport. Street Betterment - Paid in Full 
ommitted Interest 
napport. Water Betterments 
napport. Street Betterments 
nterest & Costs 

[unicipal Lien Cert. & Cert. Dissolving Betterments 

mbulance 

.dvertising 

TOTAL COLLECTIONS 



1977 

4,636,841.23 
7,402.22 
4,244.63 
7,668.05 
3,718.75 
20,601.71 
1,834.87 
481.60 
78.70 
169,921.53 
155.63 



1976 

$ 4,254,383.51 
572.39 
194.39 
259.64 
210.69 
2,921.26 
5,393.77 
3,782.35 

145,853.92 
116.37 
457,086.81 
1,568,14 
23.79 
3,926.72 
84.45 
900.00 
3,346.43 
26,365.53 
2,742.00 
4,322.40 
80.25 



$ 9,724,257.34 
9,455.77 
5,657.52 
8,498.79 
4,230.90 
25,555.40 
7,228.64 
4,263.95 
78.70 
342,572.17 
311.25 
568,417.25 
25,816.51 
1,141.25 
1,568.14 
23.79 
3,926.72 
84.45 
47,706.26 
75,594.31 
7,990.00 
$10,864,379.11 

OTHER YEARS 

$ 102,535.10 
114.39 
51.40 
83.86 
67.44 
1 ,038.14 



558.48 
106,536.27 



$ 9,978,068.81 



13 



Town Counsel 



In accordance with the requirements of the Town By-Laws, I submit herewith my report as Town Counsel covering 
the year 1976. 

A. On January 1, 1976, there were pending the following actions by or against the Town (exclusive of action 
in which the Town was merely summoned as trustee, and in which it had no interest, and of tax lien foreclosur 
proceedings in the Land Court and petitions for abatement before the Appellate Tax Board*) . 

Beatrice G. Swenson v. Town of Wilmington etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages for land taking) 

Harvey Lobdell v. Board of Appeals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition in equity for appeal for variance 
by zoning by-laws) 

Androniki Gaglione v. Thomas B. Brennan etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages) 

Joseph Scaro etal v. County of Middlesex etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of dama 

for land taking) 

Town of Wilmington v. John Benevento etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Action to restrain the removal of 
soil, loam, sand or gravel) 

John J. Elia v. Bruce MacDonald etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for writ of certiorari concern 
ing revocation of a gasoline storage license) 

John E. Hayward etal v. County of Middlesex etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages for land taking) 

John E. Hayward etal v. County of Middlesex etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages for land taking) 

Hillcrest Realty Inc. v. A. Daniel Glllis etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal of decision of Planning 
Board denying approval of definitive subdivision) 

Morton Grant etals v. Robert E. Jennings etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal from decision of the 
Board of Appeals) 

Robert Stevens, Tr . v. Town of Wilmington and Planning Board, Land Court (Petition for registration and 
claim to Swain Court - Private Way) 

Town of Wilmington v. Frank C. Powers etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for contempt for failure 
to comply with final decree) 

Town of Wilmington v. Boston and Maine Railroad, U.S. District Court - Bankruptcy (In-re Boston and Maim 
Railroad Reorganization Proceedings - Claim for real estate taxes due) 

Robert W. Merserve tal Trustees for the property of Boston and Maine Railroad Corporation v. Town of 
Wilmington - Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damages) 



14 



Richard D. Zambernardi etal v. Town of Wilmington Board of Selectmen, Middlesex Superior Court (Suit in 
quity for declaratory judgment to determine the validity of betterment assessment) 

Town of Wilmington v. Joseph A. LaCreta, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition in equity to enforce the 
oning by-law) 

Harry S. Sukeforth etals Trs. v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition 
or assessment of damages) 

Else M. Lanois v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damages for 
and taking) 

William L. Schromm etals v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Bill in 
quity claiming damages and specific relief concerning incidents related to sewer construction) 

Robert Lewis v. Esther L. Russell etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for writ of mandamus to re- 
uire Town Clerk to issue kennel licenses) 

Sanborn Brothers, Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell (Action for property damage - 
egligence) 

Clarence Spinazola v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damages) 

Robert L. Stevens v. William G. Hooper Jr., etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal under C.Al,s.81BB 
from the failure of the Planning Board to properly endorse a plan) 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Bill of Complaint for Declara- 
ory Relief as to the Validity of a Sewer Betterment Assessment) 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Bill of Complaint for Declara- 
elief as to the Validity of Assessment of Sewer Use Charges, for Recovery of Damages and for Injunctive 
elief) 

George Anderson etal v. Town of Wilmington etal. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Claim for 
ersonal injury) 

School Teacher v. The Wilmington School Committee, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (Complaint of 
iscrimination as to benefits) 

John J. Lyons etal v. Town of Wilmington, Land Court (Complaint to determine validity and extent of the 
Dning By-Laws of the Town of Wilmington) 

George W. Lloyd etal v. Jackson Brothers, Inc. and Town of Wilmington Middlesex Superior Court (Complaint 
or alleged damages resulting from diversion of water) 

Pallotta & Son Development, Inc. v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court 
Petition for assessment of damages) 

James Zaccagnini v. James Marsi, Middlesex Superior Court (Complaint alleging libel by police officer in 
tie performance of his duties) 

Alfred T. Drinkwater etal Trustees v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assess- 
Bnt of damages) 

Edward W. Powers etal v. Town of Milton etal. Supreme Judicial Court (Declaratory judgment to determine 
onstitutionality of -Civil Service Statute) 

John D. Cooke v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damages) 

Richard J. Harnish etal v. Bruce MacDonald etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal from decision of Board 
I Appeals) 



15 



John V. Kunigenas, etals v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition f 



assessment of damages) 



Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for abatement of 
sewer betterment assessment) 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for abatement of 
sewer use charge) 

Town of Wilmington v. Jean-Cor Construction Corp., etal. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex 
(Claim for damages caused by trespass, conversion and destruction of town owned property and well field) 

Alice S. Brown v. Town of Wilmington, Land Court (Petition for assessment of damages for land taking) 

Fred T. Corum etal v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for 
assessment of damages for land taking) 

Donald C. Eaton etal v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damage 
for land taking) 

Rosaline T. Abl-Ezzi v. Wilmington School Committee etal, Massachusetts Commission Against Discriminati 
(Claim for payment of maternity benefits) 

Carl E. Hussey v. Town of Wilmington etals, Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (C laim Agai 
Town for discrimination in awarding contract) 

Marie Mack v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment 
damages for land taking) 

Austin L. Rounds v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damages fo 
assessment of damages for land taking) 

Joseph J. Salpietro etal v. Robert E. Shelley etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Claim for personal injury 
and property damage) 

Alice Papaliolios v. A. Daniel Gillis etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Complaint for invasion of privac; 
and defamation) 

Town of Wilmington v. Richard Anderson, Middlesex Superior Court (Bill to vacate award of Board of Con- 
ciliation and Arbitration) 

Town of Wilmington v. Robert E. Palmer, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Claim for property 
damage to fire truck) 

A Daniel Gillis etal v. Antonio J. Tambone, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal of the decision of 
the Board of Appeals granting a comprehensive permit (Chapter 774 of the Acts of 1969) 

*There are pending as of January 1, 1977, 41 separate petitions for abatements before the Appellate Tax 
Board, many involving claims for several different years. 

B. (1) During the year 1976, the following new actions were brought against the Town of Wilmington or its 
officers or agents: 

Beverly A. Berrigan, etals, v. James F. Banda, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Suit to enjoin alleged 
invalid expenditure) 

Department of Environmental Quality Engineering of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts v. the Town of 
Wilmington etal, Suffolk Superior Court (Suit to enjoin Town's use of Spinazola's sanitary land fill) 

Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical School District Committee v. Town of Wilmington etals , 
Middlesex Superior Court (Suit to recover alleged deficiency appropriation plus penalty) 

Donald Robbins, Trustee v. A. Daniel Gillis, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages) 

16 



James Zaccagninl v. Sterling C. Morris, etals, U. S. District Court of Massachusetts (Suit alleging 
elation of plaintiff's civil rights) 

Kevin McKelvey v. Town of Wilmington etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Suit alleging breach of employment 
ntract) 

B. (2) During the year 1976, the following new actions were brought by or on behalf of the Town: 

Town of Wilmington v. Rosnoe Construction Corp., etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Action to restrain the 
moval of soil, loam, sand or gravel from defendant's premises) 

C. During the year 1976, the following actions by or against the Town were finally disposed of: 

' William L. Schromm etals v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Dis- 
sed of by Stipulation of Dismissal with prejudice and payment of retainage held by Town pending disposition 
Bill in Equity) 

Richard J. Harnish etal v. Bruce MacDonald etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Dismissed by Court) 

Town of Wilmington v. John Benevento etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Dismissed by stipulation assented 
by all parties) 

Pallotta & Son Development, Inc. v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court 
isposed of by satisfaction of execution of the Middlesex Superior Court, after jury trial, in the amount of 
5,012.20 in addition to pro tanto sum paid) 

Alfred T. Drinkwater etal. Trustees, v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by 
tisfaction of execution of the Middlesex Superior Court in the amount of $22,000.00 in addition to pro 
ito sum paid) 

Town of Wilmington v. Robert E. Palmer, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Disposed of by pay- 
it of $750.00 to the Town to reimburse for property damage) 

Clarence Spinazola v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Dismissed by the Court) 

Town of Wilmington v. Jean-Cor Construction Corp., etal. Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex 
Lsposed of by conveyance of a parcel of land to the Town and return of 2,000 square yards of earth material 
the Town) 

Department of Environmental Quality Engineering of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts v. the Town of 
Lmington, etal, Suffolk Superior Court (Disposed of by Consent Order not to use Spinazola 's sanitary land 
Li after July 1, 1976) 



Constable 



ring the year I posted notices and warrants for the Annual and Special Town Meetings including the State 
ieral Elections. 

lave also served and posted notices for the Town and other of its officers and departments. 



of 



17 



Planning Board 



The Wilmington Planning Board has lost the help of a lot of conscientious knowledgeable people this year. F 
gretfully they accepted the resignation of members, Mr. Arthur Harding and Mr. William Hanlon, Planning Inte 
Roger Watkins and Secretary, Mary Deislinger. The Board wishes to express our gratitude to all those that Y 
left and wish them well in the future. Filling the vacant seats we have a new member, Mr. Kenneth Miller, a 
Secretary in Sandra Lee Murphy and replacing our Planning Intern, Madelyn McKie, Planning Assistant, a past 
member of the Planning Board. 

The Planning Board generally meets on the first and third Tuesdays for general planning and the second and 
fourth Tuesdays for consideration of Subdivisions and Plans. 

General Planning 

The Board was most active in the area of General Planning this year, taking up such matters as: 

1. Sign By-Law - This Article, if approved, would create a more attractive business climate, enhance a 
protect the physical appearance of the town, provide a more enjoyable and pleasing environment and 
would encourage the most appropriate use for the land. 

2. Zoning By-Law - The purpose of the By-Law is to bring the Town's zoning into conformance with the 
State's new Zoning Enabling Act, Chapter 40A G.L. as amended as presented in Section 2A of Chapter 8 
of the Acts of 1975. 

3. Route 129 By-Pass - Several times this past year the Planning Board has met with state officials ar 
members of the engineering firm Barnes and Jarnis. Discussions focused on the several alternatives 
for design of a Route 129 By-Pass and the secondary impact on the land adjacent to it. Regardless 
the proposal built, all will affect the use of the land along the route. The Planning Board feels 
that with proper planning of the land adjoining any of the proposed alternatives, Wilmington could 
achieve one of their long sought after goals, a more attractive, useful and viable center of town. 

Subdivisions and Plans 

This year the Board reviewed two subdivisions of property, Balfour Estates, off Broad Street and Woburn Heig 
off Woburn Street, both were disapproved for a number of reasons. We also reviewed thirty-nine (39) plans 
believed not to require approval under the Subdivision Control Law. Thirty-five (35) were approved and four 
(4) were disapproved. 

This was the first year the Board worked with the new Subdivision Rules and Regulations which are the standa 
and specifications the builder must use when building a new development. Among many new revisions was the p 
vision that allows the Planning Board to assess a fee for engineering and related costs incurred by the Towr 
in the development of a new subdivision. This year the Planning Board has collected $2,425 in fees. 

Some of the important matters the Board hopes to take up in the coming year include: 

1. Route 129 By-Pass 5. Up-date Master Plan Elements 

2. Land use along Sewer Line 6. Formulation of Lot Shape Definition 

3. Central Recreation Area 7. Assist Housing Authority in search for new housing 

4. Sidewalks and Bicycle Paths 

The Planning Board would like to thank all those who helped so greatly especially Robert L. Higgins, Town 
Engineer, all Boards and Committees, Town Officials and hope for their continued help and support in the 
coming year. 



18 



Library Trustees 



e Library Trustees, listed in the front of this annual Town Report, hereby report to the citizens of 
Imington mainly by means of an informative narrative by our professional Director Philip W. Meriam. 

is year one of the main emphasis has been the Reference and Technical Services as detailed in the director's 
port. 

e trustees regretfully report the resignation of Mrs. Sally Harding after four years of dedicated service on 
e board made necessary by the Hardings moving to Maine. 

e Bicentennial Room as mentioned in previous reports, is now completed, dedicated and in great demand. 

e trustees are working under a "deliberate policy of expanded service" to the residents of Wilmington. The 
wnspeople use of, and response to this policy has been so gratifying that the board intends to and shall 
ntinue to do so, with the enthusiasm of our very able and dedicated hard working staff. 

LIBRARY STATISTICS 
for the calendar year January 1 - December 31, 1976 
American Library Association Form 

Library: 
Town and state: 
Library Director: 
Date of founding: 
Population: 1976 
Number of agencies: 

Number of days open during the year: 
Hours open each week: 

Number of volumes beginning of the year 1976: 
Number of volumes purchased during the year: 
Number of volumes added as gifts: 
Number of volumes withdrawn during the year: 
Number of volumes as of December 31, 1976: 
A/V materials: 
Newspapers : 
Periodicals : 
Prints: 
Circulation: 

Adult: 67,038 Children: 36,742 111: 133 



A/V: 4,984 Periodicals: 3,472 Prints: 974 113,343 

Circulation per capita: 6.37 

Appropriations and income: $175,814 

Per capita expenditures: $ 9.88 

Reference questions: 3,739 
Interlibrary loans: 

Requests from other libraries: 39 

Received from other libraries: 204 
Circulation figures: 

1971 93,750 

1972 84,652 

1973 99,183 

1974 102,186 

1975 117,612 

1976 113,343 



Wilmington Memorial Library 
Wilmington, Massachusetts 
Philip W. Meriam 
1871 
17,800 
Main Library 
305 
69 

56,114 
4,531 
243 
1,725 
59,163 
2,701 
13 
269 
175 



19 




Librarian 



In accordance with the statutes of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the By-laws of the Town of Wilmingti 
it is with pleasure that I submit my report with its accompanying statistics for the calendar year of 1976. 

The Memorial Library follows a deliberate policy of expanded service. The year of this nation's Bicentennia! 
has not been one of retrenchment. The library again proves to be neither dormant nor static. As a public 
institution it proves to be lively, innovative, healthy, and prosperous. The Memorial Library's reputation 
for low-keyed friendly service of high quality and for the excellence of its collections continues to grow. 
It can be stated that the expectations of the library's wide variety of patrons are surpassed. 

This report features the activities and work of the Reference and Adult Services Department. A grant from 
the Massachusetts Bicentennial Commission with matching funds provided by the Town's Bicentennial Commission 
made the furnishing of the "Bicentennial Room" a reality for the preservation, protection, and collection of 
Wilmington's historical and genealogical books, papers, and memorabilia. The Wilmington Collection is now 
properly housed, and is available for public use. Throughout the year, the Reference and Technical Services 
Departments have worked to index newspapers, catalog historical material, Town documents, and other material 
of historical value. The "Bicentennial Room" is now used daily for small conferences, quiet study, or for 
research. 

The Reference and Technical Services staff revised the Main Catalog to improve its direct use by the library 
patrons. Subjects, titles, and authors are no longer interfiled, but are now separated to permit a choice o; 
approaches. Special collections of recordings, cassettes, local newspaper indexes, and large print books ar( 
now separately cataloged and filed, and a list of books on order is also made available to the public. 

The reference staff completed an evaluation of the Memorial Library's holdings and retention of magazines. 
Various microforms, fische, and film have been thoroughly investigated for the purposes of information re- 
trieval and storage. Appropriate "hardware" has also been researched to give the library the best reader- 
printer for its purposes. The staff also investigated various electronic circulation systems, and examined 
and simplified existing circulation procedures. A Circulation Manual of Procedures is in preparation to gui( 
present and future staff. 

The Memorial Library undertook a detailed inventory of its reference collection, and began inventorying its 
non-fiction holdings. This inventory confirmed the belief that something needs to be done to protect library 
materials from further erosion and loss. The Library Director and professional staff took several investi- 
gative steps, and the director has made specific recommendations to the Board of Library Trustees. The 
trustees foirwarded the Proposal for a Security and Detection System for the Wilmington Memorial Library to tl 
appropriate Town officials for further action. 

The reference staff evaluated the Business and Legal collections. The Massachusetts Practices Series was ad- 
ded to the legal section and is proving to be of value to the student, layman, and practicing attorney. U.S. 
Law Week , a publication of the Bureau of National Affairs, was added for the students, teachers, lawyers and 
members of advocacy groups as it provides weekly summaries of federal legislation. Moody's Municipal and 
Government Manual was added to the business section with its information for local businessmen and Town offi- 
cials. A constant effort is made to maintain an informative up-to-date and accessible business and legal 
collection. 

The Library Director and professional staff continues to explore avenues of mutual cooperation with the 
Wilmington school system. Unfortunately, circulation statistics show a decline from 1975. This is attribute 
to the termination of the scheduled use of the public library by the Central District elementary schools who |i 
have no libraries of their own. The schools discontinued their visits because of the cost of bussing. 

20 



t is with pleasure that it can be reported that these school visits are scheduled to resume as of January 1977 
nd that these children will again receive library service on a regular basis. However, other components of 
he school system used the library heavily. The High School students dominated the library scene in the morn- 
ngs throughout the school year. Class visits were arranged together with special reserve collections of need- 
d books. Full reference services are provided to the schools at all levels. 

he daily statistical count of reference questions continues to express the need for information at all levels 
f sophistication. These needs range from those generated by trivia buffs, to those in need of consumer in- 
ormation, to those in need of source material for various academic reports of differing complexity. The 
irector and staff hear frequently the remark that the library's reference collection surpasses the patron's 
xpectations which is gratifying news indeed. 

he additional service of providing free museum passes is met with great appreciation. The library provides 
hese passes to the Museum of Transportation, Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Franklin Park Zoo, and the 
useum of Science. It is hoped that the Boston Aquarium will soon make an institutional pass available. In 
he meantime, these passes are very popular with the Museum of Science pass being particularly in demand. 

looks are still the library's "stock-in-trade" and major concern. The professional staff reviewed and selected 
11 the materials added to the collections whether they be large print, reference, fiction, non-fiction, paper- 
ack, or pamphlets. The staff considered replacements and withdrawals, it evaluated gifts, and strengthened 
he collections where-ev^r possible. It maintained a local best-sellers' list, and handled inter-library 
oans. It evaluated purchase requests, and met reserve requests as soon as possible. The entire staff wres- 
led with the age old problem of getting overdue library material back, if not on time, at least back. Quiet, 
riendly, but persuasive phone calls are a great help. Most patrons, as usual, are cooperative and obliging. 

hese few paragraphs hopefully illustrate the dimensions of the Reference and Adult Services Departments. The 
ide variety of activity and work has been illustrated to make the point that the Memorial Library is not just 
tatistics and books; nor the library just the Reference and Adult Services Department. It is the children's 
ppartment, and the Technical Services Department, and the entire staff. 

he Memorial Library's reputation lies with its staff and in the strength of its collections and services, 
tie Library Director gratefully acknowleges the caliber of work of the staff. To these individuals goes the 
tedit for a successful year of continuation. 




Past Presidents, and the President, of the Wilmington Women's Club on their 75th Anniversary 



21 



Police Department 



ARRESTS 

Assault & Battery 

Arson 

Auto Theft 

Breaking & Entering 

Disorderly Conduct 

Forgery 

Larcency 

Narcotics 

Non-Support 

Receiving Stolen Property 
Robb ery-Armed 
Sex Offenses 
Vandalism 

Violation of Liquor Laws 
All Other Offenses 



44 
2 
13 
21 
2 
1 
77 
18 
15 
9 
2 
2 
5 
10 
138 
359 



ROBBERIES 
By Firearm 
With Knife 
Strong Arm 



LARCENY 

Pocket Picking 
Purse Snatching 
Shoplifting 
From Motor Vehicles 
Auto Parts 
From Buildings 
From Coin Machines 
All Other 



1 

3 
3 

151 
49 
19 
6 

194 
426 



MOTOR VEHICLE ARRESTS 
Driver's License Violations 
Endangering 

Leaving Scene After Property Damage 
Operating Under Influence of Alcohol 
Unregistered & Uninsured 
Speed 

Using Without Authority 

Operating After Suspension or Revocation 
All Others 



DETAINED FOR PROTECTIVE CUSTODY-NO ARREST 



JUVENILE CASES HANDLED BY THE COURT 



JUVENILE CASES HANDLED WITHIN DEPARTMENT 



33 
24 
5 
70 
33 
149 
2 
7 

239 
562 

411 

76 

25 



BICYCLES 

Stolen 

Recovered 



MOTOR VEHICLES 

Stolen from Wilmington-Recovered by Town 
Stolen in TOwn-Recovered Elsewhere 
Stolen Out of Town-Recovered by Town 

SEX OFFENSES 
Rape 

Attempts 

Indecent Exposures 
Indecent Assaults 
All Others 



101 
16 
117 



38 
41 
37 



2 
10 
23 

7 
14 
56 



OFFENSES REPORTED 
Assaults : Gun 

Knife 

Other Weapon 
Hands, Feet, etc. 
Other Assaults 



BREAKING & ENTERING 



Forced Entry 
No Force 
Attempts 



2 
2 
9 
30 
28 
71 



222 
13 
64 

299 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Arson 2 

Bomb Threats 11 

Disturbances 1,026 

Domestic Problems 158 

Emergencies 268 

Fires Dispatched to 245 

Juvenile Problems 2,418 

Lost and Found 66 

Malicious Damage 785 

Missing Persons 56 

Missing Persons Returned 39 

Phone Calls-Suspicious, Obscene & Annoying 55 



22 



[SCELLANEOUS (continued) 




OTHER DEPARTMENT FUNCTIONS 




rowlers 


91 


Firearm Identification Cards Issued 


143 


idden Deaths 


8 


License to Carry Firearms Issued 


88 


licides 


2 


Permits to Sell Ammunition Issued 


4 


itempted Suicides 


8 


Firearm Dealer Permits Issued 


4 


ireats 


37 


Gunsmith Permits Issued 


5 


raisers Dispatched 


6,786 


Liquor Identification Cards Issued 


57 


)tor Vehicle Accidents 


537 


Summonses Delivered 


306 






Suspensions & Revocations from RMV 


52 



le first part of this report deals with the statistics for the year 1976. 

lese are just figures to everyone; everyone but "we" who are engaged in the work that goes into making them up. 

imbers do not tell you much, that's for sure.. But if you want an explanation of any figures as they appear in 
lis report - please call me any day at 658-9261 (preferably) - but I will be only too glad to answer any ques- 
ons at night if you will call 658-3162. 

ly I once again remind all residents that the numbers to call Wilmington Police are: 

FOR EMERGENCY CALLS: 658-3331 

658-3332 

FOR OTHER CALLS: 658-5071 

658-5072 

935-5966 (Woburn Line) 

iease remember that cruisers are on the road twenty-four hours a day all over Town - So do not hesitate to call 
- we might just be down the street from where the action is. 

many times we have heard the same old story.' I We would have called - but figured by the time you got here, 
would have been too late I 

ems Worthy of Note in 1976 : 

rry Redding was appointed a Temporary Officer on July 16th and is doing a real nice job for the Department, 
affic Supervisors who resigned in 1976 include: Marilynn Lynch, Nancy Auer, Madge Sabre, Margaret Cunningham, 
affic Supervisors Appointed Fulltime: Dorothy Charbonnier, Rosemarie Morgan, Frances Dec, Evelyn Grassia. 
affic Supervisors Appointed Part-time: Margaret Stewart and Patricia Johnson. 

ill giving it the old college try are twelve members of the Department: Sergeant Mercier, Sergeant Palmer and 
rgeant Stewart, while Patrolmen, Joe Cuoco, Bill Gable, John Harvey, Bob LaRivee, Arthur Lynch, Dave McCue, 
rnie Nally, John Ritchie and Bob Spencer are also giving it their best effort. All deserve to be congratulated 
r their efforts. Sergeant Palmer received his Associate Degree in Law Enforcement on May 28, 1976 from the 
ddlesex Community College. 

Imington had the biggest parade ever on Saturday July 3rd in celebration of the Bicentennial Year. It was 
eat. 

Imington was co-host with Tewksbury in having the Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts Traffic Policewomen's 
sociation on May 7, 1976 at the Elks Hall in Tewksbury. Wilmington Police Associates again deserve a "Great 
g Thank You" for the wonderful Summer Recreation Program they put on and also the Jimmy Fund Auction. 

other Report I Another Year I So, on October 20, 1976, I completed my twenty-eighth year as Chief. 

d now to conclude this report, once again let me take this opportunity to express my most sincere thanks and 
preciation to everyone who has been in any way of help or assistance to the Wilmington Police Department dur- 
g the year 1976.. 

ecial thanks and appreciation are hereby extended to the Department Heads and their crews for all the help 
ven us throughout the year, to all members of the Department, to the Traffic Supervisors, to the Department 
erks, to the Board of Selectmen, to the Town Manager and Assistant Town Manager, to the Committees of the 
wn Government and Town Organizations; "Thanks so much for all your efforts in 1976". 



23 



Fire Department 



The manual force consists of the Chief, Deputy Chief, four Lieutenants and twenty-five Privates. There is 
a call force of ten members. The department responded to a total of one thousand nine hundred and eighty 



(1,980) calls. This represents five hundred and thirty-two more calls than we made last year. 

Residential Buildings 55 Out of Town Assistance 21 

Commercial Buildings 10 False Alarms or Needless Calls 143 

Vehicles 107 Rescue and Ambulance 652 

Brush, grass and rubbish 765 Service Calls 227 

Estimated value of property endangered was $ 9,465,350 

Estimated property loss was $ 272,481 

Permits issued for storage of oil 39 

Permits issued for blasting 10 

Permits issued for home fire alarms and inspections 54 



As required by law, inspections were made of all schools, public buildings and all inflammable storage. 

The Fire Prevention Bureau, under the direction of Deputy Chief Wandell, made all necessary inspections of 
all business establishments in Town. Local industries were assisted in the organization and training of fir 
brigades. Fire Prevention lectures were given to the Schools. 

The Fire Alarm Division, under the direction of Private Blasidell, made all necessary repairs to the fire 
alarm system and made fifty-four (54) changeover s for the light and telephone companies. Two new boxes were 
added to the system - numbers 6352, 1223. Three miles of new wire were strung, and two miles of wire in the 
system were replaced. All alarm boxes were checked and tested during the year. 

Privates Walter Sowyrda, Thomas Robbins, Stephen Robbins, William Lopez, Edmund Corcoran, Alfred Meuse and 
Joseph Lundergan completed an 81 - hour course of Practical Emergency Care at the Winchester and Choate 
Hospitals as required by law for all ambulance services. 

Privates John Brown, Gerald Duggan, Edward Fuller, Richard Fuller and George Anderson, Jr. completed a re- 
fresher course in Practical Emergency Care, which has to be taken every two years. 

Deputy Chief Wandell, Lieutenant Blonigen, Privates Corcoran, Meuse and Lundergan are attending fire-related 
courses at the Community College. 




Wilmington Minutemen - Presenting Arms, and participating in the 200th Anniversary Parade, 
passing the home of their first commander, Capt. Cadawallader Ford. 



24 



Inspector of Buildings 



relling (single family) 
;sidential Garages 
Iditions & Alterations 



idustrial Buildings 
immercial Buildings 
Iditions & Alter, (non-res) 
rimming Pools 
■gns 

ility Buildings 
■fice Buildings 
'.creational Buildings 
leds & Barns 



newals 
molitions 

re Damage & Repair 
undations 



ilding Permits 
ring Permits 

Permits 
umbing Permits 







1974 






1975 


No • 




Valuation 


No . 




Valuation 




<; 


2,520,000 


72 


9 


1 , 957 , 000 


9 




31 , 350 


9 




40,350 


90 




287,850 


129 




288,390 




$ 


2,839,200 




$ 


2,285,740 


3 


$ 


1,135,000 


5 


$ 


1 , 230,000 


3 




40,300 


2 




5,400 


10 




759,400 


16 




2,108,400 


83 




143,870 


42 




97,750 


7 




1,950 


15 




17,575 


3 




53,000 









u 






1 




















5 




2,800 


7 




14,260 




$ 


2,136,320 




$ 


3,543,385 




$ 


4,975,520 




$ 


5,829,125 


17 






14 






15 


$ 


119,900 


23 


$ 


84,400 


3 




19,000 


5 




47,000 


20 




35,750 


34 




71,500 


370 


$ 


174,650 


374 


$ 


202,900 


OVER TO 


TREASURER: 








370 


$ 


11,999.00 


374 


$ 


13,164.00 


389 




4,717.00 


362 




4,047.75 


176 




1,633.50 


121 




1,043.00 


175 




1,321.50 


150 




1,246.50 


1110 


$ 


19,671.00 


1008 


$ 


19,501.25 



No. 

68 
8 

132 



4 
4 
21 
47 
17 


1 
7 



5 
13 

2 
30 
359 



359 
376 
100 
118 
953 



1976 
Valuation 

$ 1,951,000 
37,000 
490,625 
$ 2,478,625 

$ 1,010,000 
64,600 
482,300 
130,850 
7,927 



145,000 
4,950 
$ 1,845,627 



$ 4,324,252 



$ 95,950 
20,000 
53,500 

$ 169,450 



$ 11,206.00 
3,849.75 
876.00 
701.50 
$ 16,633.25 



25 



Highway Department 



All the regular highway maintenance work was carried out during the year, such as cleaning catch basins, swe 
ing streets, patching streets, replacing guard rails, painting guard rails, erection of street signs, scrapi 
back roads with the road grader, replacing broken curbing, etc. 



Chapter 81 Maintenance: 



The following streets were resurfaced all or in part: Chestnut Street, Taft Road, Roosevelt Road, Hawthorne 
Road, Auburn Avenue, Bridge Lane, Canal Street, Harris Street, Cedar Street, Burt Road, Carter Lane, Columbi 
Street, Central Street, Beacon Street, Adelaide Street, Washington Avenue, School Street, Temple Street, Str 
Avenue, Woburn Street, Wing Road, Cowing Road, Marcus Road, Oakridge Circle, Mystic Avenue, Lockwood Road, 
Salem Street, Andover Street, Ballardvale Street, Lake Street, Fay Street, King Street and McDonald Road. 



Sidewalk Program : 



The following sidewalks were completed: Hopkins Street from Shawsheen Avenue to Dorchester Street; Federal 
Street from Mackey Road to Woburn Street; Salem Street from Woburn Street toward North Reading, curbing only 
Main Street from Middlesex Avenue to railroad depot; Thurston Avenue. 

Drainage ; 

The following drainage problems were eliminated this year: North Street, Woburn Street at Federal Street, 
Liberty Street, Marcia Road, Jacquith Road, Boutwell Street, Hobson Avenue, Middlesex Avenue near Shady Lane 
Drive, Brand Avenue - not completed. Broad Street - not completed. 

Chapter 90 Construction : 

Hopkins Street was completed this year with Chapter 90 Construction funds. 



Snow and Ice Removal: 



Snow and ice removal is a very expensive and major problem. We had about 52 inches of snow for the year. i 5l 
Clean-up/Pick-up Campaign : 

The annual clean-up/pick-up campaign was conducted in May. We picked up approximately 90 truck loads of jun 

from the homes during the 7 days of the campaign. i c 

Roadside Pick-up : 

This year we cleaned up our roadsides of rubbish on a continuous basis through the months of June, July, and : 
August with the use of N.Y.C. personnel. This is a Federally-sponsored program. 

Brooks and Streams Maintenance : i k 

As in the past years, we used N.Y.C. and C.E.T.A. personnel. Federally-sponsored programs, for our streams a> jj; 
brooks maintenance. 



26 



uipment : 



e mechanics, foreman and I have checked over the equipment and sincerely conclude that we must replace 1 dump 
uck, catch basin truck - chassis and cab only, 2 pickup trucks, 1 tractor front-end loader (Bobcat) and 1 
nder body for snow and ice removal. 

concluding my report, I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Police Department for keeping us 
formed during the winter months of snow and ice conditions between the hours of 4:00 P.M. to 7:30 A.M. week- 
ys, Sundays and holidays, the Water Department and Cemetery Department for their help during snow storms, all 
e various departments for the cooperation extended this department during 1976, the Town Manager and the 
ard of Selectmen for their support throughout the year, and last but not least, the men of the Highway Depart- 
nt who made 1976 a very productive year, my sincere thanks and appreciation. 



Tree Department 



! Tree Department carried on its routine work of trimming, cutting and removing trees. We also cut 4A stumps. 
April the annual tree planting program took place. At this time 250 trees were set out, and mostly cared 
: by the people who requested them by submitting their request at the Town Hall. Seventy-five diseased and 
id roadside trees were removed. Cut trees for the Highway Department drainage project. A number of trees 
"e fed and cared for to insure proper growth. The insect control began in April. The vehicles of the Tree 
lartment were used to plow snow for the Highway Department. Odd jobs were done when requested for the School 
ntenance Department. At Christmas time, we put up lights and decorations at the request of the Beautifica- 
in Committee, chipped brush and trimmed trees for the Water Department. 

1 Leaf Beetle and Dutch Elm Disease: 



iples of elm trees believed to be diseased were sent to the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Mass. 
ty-four diseased trees had to be taken down. 

h Department : 

control of such insects as oak skeletonizers , Japanese beetle, pine saw flies, ticks and clinch bugs, etc., 
maintained through continuous spraying; also the spraying of poison ivy. Trees were sprayed for Eastern 
t caterpillars, and fall web worms. Seventy-six hornets nests were destroyed. 

i quito Control Program : 

fog generator, owned by the Tree Department, is used for mosquito control. Between the hours of eight and 
Ive o'clock in the evening, fogging is carried on. We ask that the parents caution their children about the 
gers involved in following the fogger. Larvaecide was put in all trapped water holes to surpress the 
quito larva. 

puld like to thank the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen for their support, the Town departments for 
}ir cooperation, and the men of the Tree Department for their cooperation and efforts during the year 1976. 



27 



Conservation Commission 



In its thirteenth year of active service to the community, the Wilmington Conservation held twenty-six regu] 
meetings, seven public hearings, and maintained a full schedule of activities, including meetings with loca] 
boards, the Growth Policy Committee, Route 129 By-Pass Committee, and boards of neighboring towns in the in- 
terest of environmental protection and preservation of open space and water resources. 



Public Education 



In 1976, as in past years, three teenage boys were sponsored by the Commission to attend the Massachusetts 
Junior Conservation Camp in Spencer, Massachusetts for two weeks during the summer. Application for the can 
scholarship is open to all Wilmington boys, ages 14 to 17. Those interested in attending the camp may subm: 
a written application to the Commission by April 15. After reviewing the applicants' letters and interview] 
them in an open meeting, the Commission chooses three to go, with two alternates. 

An extensive Arbor Day planting program involved the volunteer efforts of Miss McGurn's eighth grade science 
class at the West Intermediate School and a hardy group of sixth graders at the Shawsheen Elementary School 
Flowering shrubs and evergreens were planted at both schools, with bark mulch delivered and spread by the Pi. 
Buildings and Grounds men. All were to be commended for a job well done in spite of cold and drizzling rair 

On Student Government Day, the student Conservation Commissioners toured the Lawrence Experimental Station £ 
the Resco waste disposal facility in Saugus. 



Land Acquisition 

The Annual Town Meeting approved the purchase of 19 acres of valuable flood plain and wooded marshland at tl 
confluence of Mill Brook and Maple Meadow Brook along Wildwood Street. This provides increased protection f 
the town's ground water resources and additional open space adjacent to several acres of town-owned land all 
under Conservation control. We have received several donations of land, notably 10 acres deeded to the Towr 
Conservation purposes by the Davis-Taliaferro family, thus preserving an important drainage pattern and floe 
water retention area along Glen Road. 

Wetlands Protection 

In this major field of concern this Commission held seven public hearings in 1976 as required by the Wetlanc 
Protection Act, Chapter 131, Section 40, as amended, of the Massachusetts General Laws. With the aid of the 
Town Engineering Department we have, also, reviewed and approved plans for the main and lateral sewer lines 
designed to eliminate inadequate sub-surface septic systems, especially in the Silver Lake and Ballardvale c 
of the Town. 

On occasion we have found it necessary to issue Cease and Desist Orders when violations threaten the wetlanc 
We have found most builders and contractors very cooperative, with growing awareness and comprehension of t\ 
Wetlands Protection Act. 

Commission members have made numerous on-site inspections and have responded to all citizen complaints of si 
pected violations. There is considerable field work involved in making inspections, in determing the applic 
bility of the Wetlands Act and, finally, in reviewing completed projects so that a final Certificate of Comp 
ance may be issued and recorded. 

As a group we support the activities of several environmental organizations including the Massachusetts Fore 
and Park Association, the Massachusetts Audubon Society, the Mystic River Watershed Association, Conservatic 

28 



i 



1 



If 



r Foundation, the Massachusetts Association of Conservation Commissions and the newly formed Ipswich River 
:ershed Association. 

gratefully acknowledge the years of dedicated and unselfish service to the Town of past members - Nancy 
ifman, Joe Kulig, and Arthur Bureau, whose expertise and spirit of cooperation will be missed. 

r Conunission members include Bill Ingram, Chester Bruce and Bruce Peters. Our Associate Member is Paul Rose. 



Town Engineer 



valuation of Work Load 



1 examination of the work load for the Engineering Department reveals that we spent our time this year as 
)llows : 25% Planning Board, Subdivisions; 25% Highway Department, Construction Projects; 20% Water and 
jwer Board, Construction Projects; 10% Town Wide and Future Projects; 10% Town Manager and Selectmen; 10% 
LI Others. We continue to revise our scheduling to provide service on a more balanced and equitable basis. 

i-House Procedures 



le yearly updating of Assessors' maps has over the last year been done on a more frequent basis, and this has 
roved to be a valuable tool for the town's citizens and other town departments, boards and commissions. 
Dpefully the procedures can be perfected so that changes can be shown monthly rather than yearly. 

italoging of the department's material, which had started during the year, had to be suspended when personnel 
id to be used on more pressing projects. 

rojects for the Year 



treets prepared for Town Meeting action this year were the layout of Adelaide Street, the discontinuance of 
art of Shawsheen Avenue, and the alteration of Forest Street for a future sidewalk. Subdivision streets in- 
pected during the year to assure compliance with Town standards for future street acceptance were in Juniper 
idge, Lucaya Estates, Presidential Heights, Cormier Park, Jewel Industrial Park, and Woburn Heights. 

n addition to the routine projects which the department performs, we try to complete one project of lasting 
ignificance each year. This year, the department started an outline survey of the Wildwood Cemetery which 
ill be completed shortly. 

onclusion 



ecognizing the objectives of the department, the past year has been discouraging because of loss of personnel 
nd equipment. Future budget requests reflect these objectives. 



29 



Recreation Department 



Broadly defined, leisure is unobligated time - freedom from work. Recreation is what one does during his 
leisure, solely for the enjoyment or satisfaction obtained therein. 

During the latter few decades, leisure has had a profound effect upon the American way of life. Our society 
changed from one that was basically work-oriented to one that is increasingly leisure - centered. 

Recreation has become a 50 billion dollar a year industry in this country alone. Patterns of growth within 
area are not easily discernible, but one thing is for sure: How we utilize our leisure time and recreation 
tions will underlie our individual and national future as we head into the 21st century. 

The following departmental objectives guide us in our efforts: 

OBJECTIVES 

To provide opportunities for self expression 
To develop a sense of personal worth 

To provide activities that allow for personal achievement and accomplishment 
To provide activities that are fun and enjoyable 

To provide physical activities which are new and different, offering a certain amount of challenge to 
participants 

To teach skills in various activities that will have carry-over value in later life 

To provide a healthful and diversified program of recreation activities in an attempt to meet the needs and 
interests of the people being served 

The Recreation Department in its sixth year with a full-time director presents the following information on 
1976 programs and activities: 

YOUTH PROGRAMS 

Summer Playgrounds : This program annually registers approximately 2,000 Wilmington young people between the 
ages of 6 and 12. Our seven school locations opened on June 28 and ran through August 20 on a Monday througl 
Friday basis from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The playgrounds were staffed by three leaders and a Neighborhood Y' 
Corps aide at each location. Each playground was responsible for planning and implementing a wide variety o 
recreational activities for their registrants. Included as part of each playground's program were: arts ani 
crafts, drama, inter-playground competition, tennis, field trips, special events, family night cookouts, spo 
and games, bicentennial events, quiet games, tournaments and pool days. Specialists brought arts and crafts 
and drama to each playground on a regular basis. Special events included the Knights of Columbus Soap Box 
Derby and three-day Olympics, Croquet Open, participation in the Bicentennial Parade, Horseshow Tourney, Teni 
Tourney, Police Association Beach and Swim Day, Drama Field Trip and the Children's Play. A tremendous amoui 
of volunteer and financial support by citizens and civic groups make this program unique and well received b; 
the entire town. 



30 



pecial Needs Program : Each summer the Recreation Department places much emphasis upon providing a well-rounded 
nd supervised recreation program for our handicapped children. For the second year in succession we were 
ortunate in that we were allowed to utilize Camp 40 Acres for this program. This program also began on June 28 
nd ran through August 20 on a Monday through Friday basis. Times were 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. daily. The pro- 
ram was staffed by thirteen supervisors and leaders plus seventeen Neighborhood Youth Corps personnel and many 
olunteers. Because we are so fortunate in having such assistance, the youngsters were supervised almost on a 
ne on one basis. Transportation for the approximately 50 campers was supplied by the donation of two station 
agons by Fred F. Cain, Inc. Activities at the Camp included: arts and crafts, drama, field trips, pool days, 
ctive and quiet games, family cookouts, overnight camping and physically corrective activities in the Woburn 
treet School Gym. Special events included participation in the Playground Olympics and Beach Day. Kiwanis 
lub Cookout, family night supper and awards at the K of C Hall plus the conducting of our second annual Super 
tars Competition sponsored by the Tewksbury-Wilmington Elks and participated in by 10 surrounding towns. This 
rogram is 50% reimbursable from the Commonwealth. 

een Center : This past summer marked the second year of this program for local teens. The Walker School was 
tilized as the Center with the downstairs being used as a lounge, and the two main floor classrooms being used 
s game rooms. The Center opened on Tuesday, July 6 and ran through August 20. Intermediate School youth had 
se of the facility on Monday, Wednesday and Thursday mornings from 9:00 to 12:00 noon. Grades 9 through 12 
ere involved during the evening hours of 7:00 and 10:00 p.m. on those days. Again over 500 youths registered 
nd received membership cards. Included in this program, which was staffed by three adult supervisors, were: 
ctive and quiet games, tournaments, dances, swimming at the Shawsheen Tech Pool and various field trips. 

aseball : Our Northeast Baseball League team is comprised of local boys between the ages of 15 and 18. The 
earn played a 21-game schedule in an 8-team division within the league. The season ran from June 7 through 
aly with home games being played on the High School field. Coaches and managers for the team volunteer their 
arvices. 

jf tball : Girls between the ages of 13 and 16 played Softball during June, July and August in our intra-town 
2ague. Over 100 girls participated in this 6-team league. Games were played on Saturdays at the Town Park. 
■70 teams, comprised of all stars from the league played on Tuesdays and Fridays in the Girls Middle Essex Soft- 
ill League. Girls, ages 17 and over, formed a team that played in the Northwest Suburban Softball League, 
lis team played surrounding town teams on Tuesday and Friday evenings at both the High School and Town Park. 

[even teams of boys, ages 13 to 17, formed our intra-town one pitch league. Over 100 boys participated. Their 
imes were played on Tuesdays, Fridays and Saturdays at the Town Park. All of the many fine coaches served as 
slunteers . 

)wn Beach : Many children and parents as well use the Silver Lake beaches. The two public beaches were super- 
Lsed by qualified lifeguards seven days a week from June through Labor Day. The Town is fortunate to have 
ich a valuable natural recreation asset within its borders. 

j ?imming Lessons : The Recreation Department initiated the first Wilmington usage of the new pool at Shawsheen 
';ch. Free intermediate lessons for boys and girls between the ages of 9 and 12 were run on Wednesday and 
"iday evenings from 6:00 to 7:00 and on Saturdays from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Three classes met from May 5 
) June 18. 

iring the summer, free lessons were conducted at Silver Lake. Three sessions of two-weeks' duration were held 
ir beginners between the ages of 6 and 10. An advanced lifesaving and water safety course was also offered 
ee of charge. These lessons were for residents, ages 16 and over. Adults had the opportunity to participate 
I a free swim, and learn to swim, program at the Tech Pool. All of our swimming programs have been free of 
uarge and have been received as well as any other program. There is usually a waiting list for these lessons. 

- sketball : Our winter basketball league, in its 13th season registered approximately 500 people from ages 9 
I- up. There were 45 teams in the three youth divisions and men's divisions. The season ran from December 
irough March. Games were played on Wednesday and Thursday evenings plus most of the day on Saturday and Sun- 
ly. Nearly 100 volunteers served as coaches and officials for this winter league. 

'rls' teams practiced on Tuesday evenings from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. in the Woburn Street School Gym. Women 
lacticed in the same gym from 8:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Boys' teams practiced in the West Intermediate School 
(m on Thursdays from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m., while the men practiced in that gym from 8:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. 

'e 6th Annual Basketball Tournament was played from March 25 to 31st in the High School Gym. Eighteen teams 
Irticipated in this event. 

i 



31 



Girls Ice Hockey : Our hockey team for teen age girls played in the Merrimack Valley Girls' Hockey League frc 
September 28 through April A. Games were played on Sundays in Tyngsboro. 



Soccer : Our two spring soccer teams for boys competed in the Boston Area Youth Soccer League. The A team fc 
boys, ages 16 and under, played on Sunday while the B team, comprised of boys ages 14 and under, played on 
Saturdays. The season ran from April through mid-June with home games being played at the Shawsheen School. 

Elementery Open Gyms : The Shawsheen and Woburn Street School Gyms were open to grades 1 through 6 on Saturdf 
mornings from January through March 27. A variety of active sports and games were available for the childrer 
These gyms are usually filled to capacity during the open gym hours. 

Intermediate Open Gyms : Both the North and West Intermediate School Gyms were utilized by intermediate age 
students on Saturday afternoons from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. Basketball, gym hockey and tumbling were available tc 
participants. This program also ran from January through March 27. 

Bowling : This is an extensive school year program which runs out of Pleasure Lanes in North Reading. The pi 
gram ran every weekday after school from early October through mid-April. Included were grades 4 through 12. 
Each bowler and school participated once a week. Bowlers received bus transportation from the school to the 
lanes, and back to the vicinity of each bowler's home, plus 3 strings of bowling, a bowling shirt, instructic 
supervision and a chance to win one of many trophies. A free field trip to Canobie Lake Park was conducted c 
May 1, for the bowlers. 

Santa's Workshop : Nearly 500 good little boys and girls visited Santa and his elves at their busy Workshop i 
the former Mildred Rogers School. The Workshop was open from December 19 through 22. Children were able to 
sit on Santa's knee and receive a color snapshot with Santa. They also received a candy cane, a helium fill€ 
balloon and a chance to win prizes from under Santa's tree all free of charge. Donations received in connect 
with the program were sent to Globe Santa. 

Others : The Recreation Department either sponsored or participated in the following programs for Wilmington 
youth: vacation programs, ski trips, dances, Jr. Winter Carnival, Celtics trips, Easter Egg Hunt, free publl 
skating. Memorial Marathon, free throw competition. Horribles Parade and Student Government Day. 

ADULT PROGRAMS 

Men's Open Gym : Men, ages 18 and over, were able to participate in an informal gym program on Thursday even- 
ings from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. in the West Intermediate School Gym. This program is usually well attended and 
runs from November through March. 

Basketball : Men competed in a separate league within the basketball league. Their games played in the High 
School Gym on Sundays and Wednesday evenings. The season began in December and lasted through March. 

Ladies Open Gym : Ladies, ages 18 and over, had the use of the Woburn Street School Gym Tuesday evenings fron 
8:00 to 9:30 p.m. Informal basketball was the activity provided. The program ran from early December throug 
March. 

Co-ed Volleyball : This popular co-ed adult program ran on Wednesday evenings from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. in the 
North Intermediate School Gym. The program ran from November into March and was always well attended. 

Ladies Slimnastlcs : Due to the increasing interest in this program, an additional class had to be added to t 
one scheduled. One class ran from January to April on Wednesday evenings in the Shawsheen School Gym, and 
another class ran from September through November. The ladies exercised to music, jogged, participated in in 
formal competitive games and were given instruction in belly dancing, folk dancing and tennis by professional 
teachers . 

Ballroom Dancing : Our most popular adult program ran on Monday evenings in the North Intermediate School 
Cafeteria. Beginners, intermediate and advanced classes were conducted in lO-week programs. There were fall 
winter and spring sessions most of which were filled to capacity. Nearly 500 Wilmington couples have particl 
pated in the program. 

Softball : A very active and successful men's Softball league was conducted over the summer at the Town Park. 
This entire program is supervised and conducted by volunteers spending much valuable time to insure the con- 
tinued success of this program. 



32 



lers : Additional adult programs involving the Recreation Department were: men's ice hockey, ladies bowling, 
norial Marathon, swimming lessons, use of the Town Park and beaches plus various field trips. 

■MJNITY YOUTH 

/eral youth organizations in town received partial financial support through the Recreation Department budget. 
ise excellent programs are run by interested volunteers who devote their time in helping our younger people 
;eive enjoyment through recreation activity. These organizations are Youth Hockey, Figure Skating Club, 
D Warner, Senior Little League and Pony League. 

jviding a well-diversified program of leisure recreation offerings is a town-wide function. Much support is 
:essary for the fulfillment of our programs. The Recreation Commission and Director thank those public and 
Lvate citizens plus the many civic and fraternal organizations for their generous support in helping to pro- 
le a well-rounded program of recreation activities for the Town. 



Beautification Committee 



Beautif icatlon Committee has, over the past year, become involved in a wider range of projects. 

tiave worked with elementary students at the Buzzell School, in the promoting of civic awareness of ecology, 
tiaving them assist in a planting program - a project which will be continued in the future, and hopefully, 
inded upon throughout the elementary school system. This project is being done with the cooperation of 
jral school departments. 

ire currently involved in devising a permanent plan for relandscaping the plantings In the Town Common. We 
; to see this project completed within the coming year. 

committee has also focused on improving the appearance of public grounds, with the thought that when properly 
itained, they add to the appearance of our Town. 

goal, for the coming year, is to become a more diversified committee, working in conjunction with other town 
littees on several projects that are currently being undertaken. 

committee regretfully accepted the resignations of Vonda Cram and Dorothy Siteman during this past year, 
te members were most helpful in making our past endeavors successful. 



33 



Historical Commission 



The Wilmington Historical Conmiission, comprised of five members — Melinda Murphy, Bill Meyer, Foster Balser. 
Frank Curley and Chairman Adele Passmore — sponsored in February a most successful "Open House" at the Col. 
Joshua Harnden Tavern. The guided tour offered by members of the Wilmington Women's Club in period costume, 
the demonstrations of spinning and quilting offered by local craftsmen, were enjoyed by more than 600 people 
Members of the Women's Club made and donated window curtains for the Tavern, while many other residents rail: 
by lending furniture and artifacts of interest for display. The School's Art Department and High School Hisi 
classes, as well as the Wilmington Company of Minutemen, provided still another dimension of interest and c< 
It is hoped that with the on-going support and interest of the Town, such educational and entertaining activ: 
may become a permanent part of our Town's cultural scene. 

Toward this end. Architectural Consultant Curtis Chapin completed his report — a Three Year Plan for the Dei 
opment of Harnden Tavern. This report, submitted in June, includes long range plans and suggestions for the 
uses of the Harnden Tavern, its grounds and outbuildings, as well as the creation of a governing body to be i 
up of representatives from various segments of the Town's population. 

In order to expedite the utilization of the "Tavern" facilities, the Commission brought about the formation < 
social and fund raising group to be called the "Friends of Harnden Tavern". Several meetings were held durii 
the summer and fall, at which time officers were elected and plans were made for programs of educational vali 
and interest to be presented throughout the year, as well as for an ultimately successful bake sale held in ' 
November . 

Accepted for listing on the National Register of Historic Places, a National Register Certificate for Harndei 
Tavern was received by the Commission in May from the National Parks Service in Washington, D.C. 

In June an historical marker, identifying the Harnden Tavern and designed in the tradition of early tavern si' 
was erected near the corner of the building, and custom-made reproductions of early lanterns were installed t 
light the entrance ways. Funds raised from private donations were used to purchase a large iron kettle and i 
antique Windsor chairs. 

The final steps in the acquisition of Harnden Tavern for the Town was completed in November. 



During the spring Foster Balser and Adele Passmore worked with the students and faculty of Shawsheen Tech in ^ 
preparation of an audio-visual slide presentation to include both a photographic record of our Town's antique 
homes and monuments and a brief history pertaining to them. 



re 
il 
dt 



In September the Commission applied to the Massachusetts Historical Commission for a survey and planning grar' ^' 
to assist in the completion of the Town inventory which has been an on-going project for the past year and a 
half. Word was received in November that the Town was the recipient of $1,000 toward this end, and a profes- 
sional consultant will be hired in January to assist with this project, which must be completed before the er 
of 1977. 

The Historical Commission wishes to convey its gratitude for the cooperation it has received from many of the 
Town's residents, as well as the various Town Boards, Commissions and Committees during this past year. A 
special word of thanks is extended to those who have become "Friends of Harnden Tavern", thus expressing thei 
confidence that Wilmington, too, has a past history, worthy of note, to be explored and preserved for future 
generations. 



34 



Public Buildings Department 



6 was a year of accomplishment for the Public Buildings and Grounds Department. While there are no large 
struction projects to point to, there were many projects accomplished which after finishing appeared to have 
ays been there; which is the object of this department. 

ing 1976, all schools and town buildings remained open. None had to be shut down due to mechanical problems 
other conditions within the control of this department. 

ting and other energy consumption systems have been fine-tuned as much as possible in every effort to seek 
iciency, safety and savings. Energy savings and heating system efficiency are our primary projects. 

department participated in the program of upgrading the High School by building a new photo laboratory, 
ing new door openings to facilitate traffic flow, installing plumbing, electrical and gas to new science 
aratory tables and work stations. Painting much of the interior of the school including classrooms, cor- 
brs, lockers and the cafeteria. Through the cooperation of the High School staff, painting was accomplished 
plassrooms while school was in session. Regular maintenance activities were carried out in the High School 

other buildings while these special projects were being accomplished. 

26 hundred sheets of 4 feet x 8 feet particle board were used in various shelf -making projects. If this 
Lvingwere laid end to end, it would result in a twelve- inch wide shelf two and three quarters miles long. 
5 shelving was installed in various buildings as needed. 

Letic f acilities received a great deal of attention during 1976. Baseball and softball fields were improved 
auch as possible. These fields are in constant use however from organized teams and the school gymnasium 
;rams . 

repair of buildings and equipment that have been vandalized remains a constant problem. One thousand and 
sixty-three windows were repaired during 1976. No major act of vandalism stands out. Defaced walls and 
liture, broken plumbing fixtures and electrical fixtures and the destruction of exterior flood lights are 
itant problems. Every attempt is made to repair vandalized objects and areas as quickly as possible. 

roof maintenance program is going well. Roofs were repaired at the High School, West Intermediate and 
:h Intermediate Schools. Damage to buildings due to leaks was minor. 

continuation of the "C.E.T.A." program provided additional personnel again this year, thus we were able to 
mplish projects that otherwise would not have been completed. 

hanks to the personnel of the Public Buildings for an outstanding job, and thanks to those departments that 
sted us during 1976. 



35 



Board of Health 



During 1976 Mrs. Marlon Boylen resigned from the Board after twenty years of service. Joseph Paglia was ele 
chairman for the period 1976-1977. 

. A town-wide Flu Program was conducted during the later part of the year together with the Wilmington 
Womens' Club and many volunteers. 

. No town monies were expended for Tuberculosis Hospitilization. Only one person was hospitalized durin 
1976. 

. A town-wide lead detection program was conducted with Community Team Work Inc. of Lowell. The results 
were negative. 

. A Diabetes Screening Clinic was held in April. 

. A Glaucoma Detection Clinic was held at no cost to the town. 

. A municipal collection system of rubbish and garbage was assigned to the Board of Health in July. 

. The garbage contract was cancelled. 

. The Board participated greatly in developing a Solid Waste Program. 

. The town dump was closed in 1976. All refuse presently collected is dumped outside of Wilmington. 

. Air pollution complaints surfaced again the latter part of the year. Steps were taken to cope with th: 
issue. 

. The Board once again participated in Hospital Day at the New England Memorial Hospital together with t 
Wilmington Womens' Club. 

. The Director of Public Health was elected to the Board of Directors of the Massachusetts Health Office 
Association. 

. Wilmington was redistricted to the Mystic Valley Health Association for Mental Health Services. 
. The Board terminated its funding of the Lowell Mental Health Association effective December 1976. 
. A monthly program for routine testing of Diabetes was started during the year. 
. The Board signed a one-year contract in August with Share. 
COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 

1. Monthly Immunization Clinic Attendance 10( 

2. Tetanus/Diphtheria Booster Clinic Number innoculated Senior Class 10 

3. Clinic for Children Exposed to Hepatitis Attendance ' 



36 




h . Communicable Diseases Reported during 1976 
5. Swine Flu Program 



6. Tuberculosis Report 





72 


Home Visits 


20 


Office Visits 


ou 


2 Sunday Clinics - Attendance 


863 


School Clinic 


108 


Other Special Clinics 


105 


Office and Home Visits 


214 


Administered by Physicians 


129 


Total Vaccine Given 


1419 


New Cases Reported During 1976 


1 


Hospitalized During Year 


1 


Home Visits 


35 


Office Visits 


88 


T.B. Tests to Senior Class 


100 


T.B. Tests to School Personnel 


206 


T.B. Tests to Children at Head Start 


29 



LEAD PAINT DETECTION PROGRAM 

A town-wide lead paint detection program was conducted with the cooperation of Community Team Work Inc. of 

Lowell. First tested were kindergarten and nursery school groups. A one-day program was then held at 

Vlllanova Hall for children 9 months to school age. 

Kindergarten Children Tested 
Nursery School Children Tested 
Town-Wide Program 

Total Number of Children Tested 

No child required treatment due to elevated levels of lead. 



247 
95 
119 
461 



DIABETIC SCREENING PROGRAM 

Persons Tested 
Positive Reactions 

All reactions were referred to private physicians for further study and testing. 
GLAUCOMA DETECTION CLINIC Persons Tested 

All persons with elevated readings were seen for consultation at the clinic by an ophthalmologist. 



174 
43 



175 



PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

1 . Nursing Visits During the Year 

2. Premature Births Reported 

3 . Newborn Infants 

4. General Health Supervision 

5 . Hypertension Program 

6 . Diabetic Screening Program 

7 . Physiotherapy 

DENTAL HEALTH 
DOG CLINIC 

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH 

1. Licenses and Permits 



Fees Collected 
Home Visits 

Hospitalization Costs to Board 

Home Visits 

Home Visits 

Attendance 
Office Visits 

Persons Screened after April in Office 

Home Visits 
Payment for Service 

Home Visits by Nurses 
Children Serviced 

Dogs Innoculated 

Sewerage 
Food 

Milk (Store) 



1668 
$162.00 
10 
11 

None 

26 

639 

195 
32 

77 

9 

$40.00 
8 

1123 

692 

135 
63 
48 



37 



I 



ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH (continued) 



Food Establishments 



Milk (Vehicle) 
Recreation Camps 
Piggeries 
Funeral Directors 
Refuse Transportation 
Installers 
Stable 

Total Fees Collected 

Inspections 
Permits Issued 
Fees Collected 

3 . Recreation Sanitation 

Samples Collected 

A . Water Analysis 

Samples Collected 

5. Subdivisions 

The Board processed six subdivisions during the course of the year, 
these. 

6. Court 

Attorney Simon Cutter continued to act as legal adviser to the Board during the year, 
ances were made involving illegal dumping, sewerage problems, and other matters. 

7. S ewage Disposal 



13 
2 
2 
2 
33 
45 
17 

$2,104.50 

68 
63 

$315.00 

6 
11 

The Board witnessed testing of 



Court appear- 



533 



Inspections and Investigations 

Garbage was then collected as part of the new 



Garbage Contract 

The garbage contract was terminated in July of 1976 
contract. 

Solid Waste 

The private dump operated by Clarence Spinazola was closed in July. A municipal collection service 
of combined rubbish and garbage then commenced in July. The refuse is being transported out of towi 
The cost of the new contract is $165,000. 



10. 
11. 
12. 



International Certificates 
Complaints 

Inspector of Animals 



Certified 



Animals Quarantined 

Animals Released from Quarantine 

Animals Disposed of 

Premises Inspected for Domestic Animals 



WILMINGTON FAMILY COUNSELING SERVICE, INC. 

Number of Families in Treatment 136 

Number of New Families Entering Treatment 71 
Number of Families Returning for Further Treatment 38 

Adult with Personal-Emotional Problems 44% 

Marital Problem 25% 

Child Adjustment or Management Problem 12% 

Adolescent Adjustment or Management Problem 12% 

Development Life Crises 7% 

Sources of Referral 

Self 27% 

Friends and Family 31% 

Physicians and Hospitals 4% 

Schools 7% 

Mental Health Professionals & Agencies 12% 

Public Health Service Agencies 15% 

Clergy 2% 

Lawyers and the Courts 2% 

Number of Families Terminating Treatment 108 
Number of Scheduled Counseling and Therapy Sessions 793 



Average per Month 
Average per Month 
Average per Month 



27 

375 

58 
58 
296 
54 

35 
6 
3 



Average per Month 



66 



Number of group counseling & therapy sessions (3-6 members) 26; (7-10 members) 27 



38 



ILMINGTON FAMILY COUNSELING SERVICE, INC. (continued) 

Number of telephone calls or correspondence with clients 
Number of contacts with other agencies regarding clients 



888 
307 



Consultation and Education Services 



Specific Agency or Group 

Mass. Rehabilitation Commission 
WITL Lowell 

Wilmington Public Schools 
Wilmington Head Start Program 
Melrose-Wakefield Hospital 
Mystic Valley Mental Health Clinic 
Wilmington Regional Health Center 
Wilmington Public Schools 



Services 

Community Information and Planning-Case Conference 

Sunshine Talk Hour Show 

Community Planning and Information 

Consultation - Education 

Case Conference 

Community Planning and Information 
Community Planning and Information 
Case Conference and Consultation 



. SHARE 

Financial Summary - Share's total income, January 1 - December 31, 1976 is $735,198.97. During this 
same twelve -month period , Share actually expended $18,213.37 in services to the residents of Wilmington 
($15,837.71 direct; $2,375.66 indirect). That is, 2.5% ($18,213.37 divided by $735,198.97) of Share's 
income went to Wilmington. Wilmington contributed $13,206., which is 1.8% of Share's income. For each 
dollar Wilmington contributed, Wilmington Citizens received $1.38 in services. 

Service Delivery Summary - During 1976, 135 Wilmington residents received counseling in either residen- 
tial or outpatient treatment. 

The Anabasis House Program has seen one individual client from Wilmington for a total of 106 days. 

The Outpatient Clinic (methadone) has seen one client from Wilmington for a total of 22 weeks. 

The Morningstar Counseling Program has counseled 33 youths and their families outside school, from 
Wilmington for a total of 487 counseling hours. 

The Emergency Shelter Program has housed two individual adolescents from Wilmington for 17 days of 
i shelter care. 

The OASIS Program has not seen any clients from Wilmington in 1976. 

Residents from Wilmington have been seen at Central Intake for Counseling. Eight individuals from 
Wilmington have been seen this year. 

Other SHARE services provided to residents of Wilmington include 274 hours in-school counseling and 
training groups in Wilmington High School and Intermediate Schools. In-school counseling involves 
direct counseling of adolescents who are usually referred by School Department personnel. Many of 
these 90 students have a problem with substance abuse as well as other adolescent adjustment issues. 

he Board wishes to extend their thanks to all those who assisted in the various health programs held during 
he year. 




Painting of the Jimmy Butters farm, located 200 years 
ago off Wood Road - given to ttie Town by a relative 



39 



Regional Health Center 



Most people who now use area hospital emergency rooms don't really need emergency care, according to Doctor ^ 
George Hazel, Medical Director of the soon-to-be built Regional Health Center in Wilmington. Dr. Hazel says, 
emergency rooms are equipped and staffed to handle emergencies such as a heart attack or serious injury and ' 
the cost of highly specialized equipment and personnel is reflected in the fees. 

In 1975, Choate agreed to build and manage the Regional Health Center after consulting with a group of Wil- 
mington residents. A health facility has long been needed in Wilmington. Choate Hospital has received unan 
imous approval from the Massachusetts Public Health Council to build and operate the new Center. 

Local advisory boards will help set policy to make sure the Regional Health Center serves the needs of eight 
surrounding communities, including Andover, Billerica, Burlington, North Reading, Reading, Tewksbury, Wilnin 
ton and Woburn. The total population of these communities is nearly 190,000 not including 14,000 to 20,000 
additional people who work in the area daily. Approximately 100,000 people constitute the Regional Health 
Center's primary service area. 

The Regional Health Center will be a 25,954 square foot ambulatory care facility located at the intersection 
of Routes 93 and 62, site of the Harden Tavern. There will be parking for 225 cars. The structure will coni 
sist of a family-oriented health center emphasizing primary care with facilities available for medical speci 
alists as needed. It is estimated that approximately 24,000 people will be served the first year, with some 
9,000 additional persons referred by physicians for diagnostic testing or therapy. Please see the fact shee 

To assist Choate Hospital trustees in planning a capital funds campaign to help finance the Regional Health 
Center, we have retained the John F. Rich Company, fund-raising counsel, to conduct a feasibility study. As 
part of this study, Henry S. Hamm, a vice president of that firm, will interview 75 hospital, corporate and 
community leaders . 



WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT THE REGIONAL HEALTH CENTER 



WHAT? 



A comprehensive, family-oriented Regional Health Center, staffed by qualified 
physicians and nurses. 



24-hour walk- in care 7 days a week. 

Owned and operated by Choate Memorial Hospital. (Choate Hospital will provide 
backup support in administration; fiscal services including data processing; 
purchasing, and diagnostic support.) 



Developed with the help of local advisory boards. 



WHERE ? 



24-acre site at intersection of Routes 93 and 62. 



FOR WHOM? 



Open to everyone but specifically for residents of Andover, Billerica, Burlington, 
North Reading, Reading, Tewksbury, Wilmington and Woburn. (Those needing hospital- 
ization will be transferred to the hospital of their choice.) 



SERVICES? 



Primary Care : 



Family Medicine 
Pediatrics 
Internal Medicine 
Obstetrics-Gynecology 



40 



SERVICES? Sub-Specialties : 

General Surgery 
Orthopedic Surgery 

Laboratory 
X-ray 



Ophthalmology 

And Others as Needed 

Physical Therapy 
Social Services 



WHEN? 



ESTIMATED 
COST? 



Groundbreaking scheduled for spring, 1977. 
Opening in spring, 1978. 

$3,000,000. Funding through taxable bond issue, capital campaign and 
hospital funds. 



Veterans^ Services 



sterans ' Services is governed by the General Laws of Massachusetts Chapter 115, with strict compliance to 
lis Chapter, the rules and policies of which govern the disbursement of aid. Benefits are for the needy 
iteran and his immediate family who have been subject to unforseen needs. Final approval of benefits comes 
"om the Commissioner of Veterans' Services, Boston, Massachusetts. 

le balance for this first six months of 1976 from previous appropriation was $56,736.37. Money encumbered 
"om remaining balance was $2,000 for payment of bills and benefits waiting for authorization for period 
iding June 30, 1976. Total available funds beginning July 1, 1976 were $77,477.50. Total expended for 
Ld to Veterans' and their families for 1976 was $39,113.58. 

)tal reimbursement for 1976 from settled assignments and/or accident cases authorized by the Commissioners 
■fice was $13,647.23. Because 50% of the amount authorized by the Commissioners Office is shared by the 
)wn, the Town's share on assignment cases was $6,823.62. The total amount of $13,647.23 has been turned 
'er to the Town Treasurer, and the Commonwealth has been notified so adjustments of any monies can be made 
ifore State reimbursement to the Town. 

lis department deals continuously with new and changing benefits and/or laws pertaining to Social Security 
id G. I. Education, plus aiding applicants for S. S. I. Unemployment due to strikes, shutdowns, and lack of 
)rk always has an impact on expenditures. Case load varies from time to time. 

le appropriation for fiscal 1977 was $75,000 as voted at the Annual Town Meeting. 



41 



Water & Sewer Department 



PUMPING STATISTICS 

WATER SUPPLY 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 

Maximum Gallons 3,796,000 A, 370, 000 4,120,000 4,364,000 4,922,0^ 

Per Day 

Maximum Gallons 21,765,000 23,202,000 23,961,000 26,641,000 31,232,0' 

Per Week 

Maximum Gallons 89,097,000 91,448,000 97,404,000 105,599,000 116,396,0 

Per Month 

Average Gallons 2,484,000 2,624,000 2,557,000 2,647,000 2,762,0 

Per Day 

Average Gallons 75,569,000 79,838,000 77,790,000 80,508,000 84,006, 

Per Month 

Total Gallons 906,833,000 958,051,000 933,478,000 966,090,000 1,008,080,0 

Per Year 

Annual Rainfall 50.42" 46.26" 37.90" 50.97" 34. " 

WATER SUPPLY 

For the first time, on our 50th anniversary, the total amount of water pumped exceeded 1,000,000,000 gallons 
for a year, and for the second time more than 4,900,000 gallons were pumped in a 24-hour period, which is moi 
than the capability of all the available pumping stations. The additional water came from storage in the sti3 
pipes, which were lowered below tolerable levels for adequate pressure and emergency fire protection. 

Partial restrictions limiting the outside use of water to alternate days were not obeyed by many users. Sucl 
lack of cooperation can only result in the future in a total ban on any outside use and imposition of legal 
penalties on violators. 

Since the number of users continues to increase, (93 new services in 1976) and the per capita consumption re- 
mains high, efforts continue to develop additional water sources within the Town. 

A test well investigation on the fringes of the Brown's Crossing wellfield was not productive and attention 
was concentrated on the wellfield itself. Investigation revealed that the gradual decrease in the capabilitjs 
of the field was not due to a loss of ground water, but rather to a deterioration of the well pipes and lateiL 
pipe connections to each well. Because the water quality remains good, it was decided to completely rebuild 
the entire wellfield. During the summer twenty-three old 2h" tubular wells were replaced by eleven modern 4' 
wells with stainless steel screens. New 4" ductile, flexible lateral connections were installed between each 
new well and the original cast iron main, which was found to be in good condition. The work of installing ne 
wells has continued into the winter, and is carried on by the Department as a maintenance schedule from rever* 
funds, at a cost to date of about $30,000. Although the work is only about a third completed, a significant 
improvement in yield has resulted. In addition, the original diesel engine #2 at Brown's Crossing was 



42 



mantled for new cylinder linings and is expected to be in operation by early spring 1977. Work has been 
rted on a new electrical service connection. The underground portion of the Venturi meter was removed, 
aned and replaced, and the diesel engine driving the centrifugal pump overhauled. 

OSS of capacity due to high iron and manganese content required redevelopment of the Chestnut Street and 
wsheen Avenue wells at a cost of over $10,000. A test well was driven east of Woburn Street, off Kilmarnock 
eet, again without finding a productive source. Other possible sites will continue to be investigated, 
criptions and estimates of cost for land acquisition for a future wellfield near the Shawsheen Avenue cran- 
ry bog are expected to be ready for consideration by the March 1977 Town Meeting. 

ER QUALITY 

overall quality of the water has been maintained within acceptable limits by a continued pipe flushing pro- 
m and the continued shut-down of the Butters Row and Aldrich Road pumping stations due to high iron and 
ganese content of the water. 

elatively new system to remove iron and manganese in the ground before it reaches a well has been developed 
Europe. This is a patented system licensed by a United States well-drilling company, and is known as the 
edox system. This system is much more economical to install and operate than conventional water treatment 
hods, but may not be successful in all ground water environments. However, preliminary tests to determine 
possibilities are being made at no cost to the Department. If successful, the Coimnissioners will consider 
tallation of a pilot plant before any commitments are made. 

cross-connections were made improving circulation and eliminating dead-ends where flushing was required. 

imposition of more rigid standards of water quality at the Federal level are being considered by the En- 
onmental Protection Agency. These standards, if imposed, will be costly. 

' er distribution system 

, 2" dead-ends in Muse Avenue were replaced and connected through to water mains in adjoining streets. The 
nection under the railroad track between Lake Street and Grove Avenue was completed. 

er testing and approval by insurance companies and State authorities the pressure boosting station in the 
theast Industrial Park was turned over to the Water Department for operation, a requirement of the State. 

(ERAL SYSTEM ADDITIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS 



By a Developer 

Houghton Road 

As Improvements to the System 
By the Water Department 

Muse Avenue 



Number of Feet 
1800' 



850' 



Size of Main 
10" 



6" 



ERAL 



By Contract 

Lake Street 650' 12" 

6 New Hydrants and 93 New Services and Meters were added to the system. 



June 3, 1976 the Commissioners voted to adopt new water rates based on a study by Coffin and Richardson, 
new rates, effective with the January 1977 billing, accomplishes two improvements, a reduction in the num- 
of steps in the rate from 5 to 3, and reduces the quarterly minimum from $11.25 for 1,500 cubic feet or 
I, to $8.40 for 1,200 cubic feet or less, which means that small residential users can save $11.40 per year. 

iew range of minimum charges and allowances for incremental increases by meter size was also established. 



iing the year Arthur R. Smith, Jr. 
Arnold C. Blake was reappointed. 



was appointed to replace Paul F. Matulewicz who resigned as Commissioner, 



iOO small booklets entitled "Water Conservation at Home" were distributed to consumers by the meter readers. 



43 



The Town on behalf of the Water Department, made application under Title I, PL 94-369, the Local Public Work 
Employment Act of 1976, for grants to construct new principal water mains needed to improve the system distr 
bution. The application proved unsuccessful. 

SEWER SYSTEM - PHASE II, SILVER LAKE INTERCEPTOR (Eames Street via Silver Lake to Ballardvale Street) 

The Board of Water & Sewer Commissioners, recognizing that the monitoring of a $7,000,000 sewer program, wit 
all the bureaucratic red tape accompanying a request for Federal funding, public hearings, and the particip 
of some 24 public agencies, and last but by no means least, the required negotiations and paper work involve 
securing easements for some 50 parcels of land, recommended to the Town Manager that a full time coordinator 
hired to assist with the foregoing and with future complications of construction and assessments. Such a co 
ordinator was considered by the Town Manager on January 19th, but this action was disapproved on January 21s 

Although the engineers have completed, submitted and obtained approval of construction plans and specif icati 
and have submitted the application for funds, the Town has accomplished little in regard to acquiring the ea 
ments beyond obtaining appraisals. The lack of a coordinator to assist in easement procurement may delay th 
start of construction, which could result in the loss or delay of Federal and State grants, some $4,000,000. 

The Commissioners have been involved in hearings with abutters, with the Middlesex Canal Association, the Ma 
achusetts Historical Commission, the Wilmington Historical and Conservation Commissions, and meetings with t': 
B. & M. Railroad, the Division of Water Pollution Control and the Environmental Protection Agency. An Arch- 
aeological Survey was made "to estimate the archaeological sensitivity of areas of Wilmington that will be 
modified in the process of laying sewerage lines and building a pumping station". The report, required by E 
WPC as a part of the Step 3 Grant Application, concludes that the "area to be modified by sewer construction 
appear to be poor places to look for archaeological sites...". 

PHASE I - SILVER LAKE INTERCEPTOR (Woburn-Wilmington Town Line to Eames Street) 

On January 12, 1973 a request for final payment for this completed section of sewer was made to the Division 
Water Pollution Control. The amount of money involved was approximately $30,000 and was needed by the Town 
order to proceed with the engineering for the Phase II program. The funds were withheld due to the difficul 
that a manufacturer experienced in meeting the chemical limitations imposed by the Metropolitan District Com- 
mission. It was not until November 8, 1976 that final approval of the effluent was given. It has now been 
four years and the money still has not been received. 

METROPOLITAN DISTRICT COMMISSION 

The Town of Wilmington's sewer system connects to the MDC sewer at the Woburn town line and is subject to MDi 
rules and regulations, as well as charges for use of the MDC sewers and treatment plants. The MDC is subjec 
to Environmental Protection Agency regulations in order to receive grants to assist in the billion dollar pn 
gram to clean up Boston Harbor. The MDC is in the process of revising their sewer use regulations and annua, 
assessments to comply with the more stringent regulations of the EPA. A public hearing pertaining to the ru 
revisions was attended by a Town official and the Sewer Commissioners, and the Commissioners recommended tha 
certain written objections be made. Certainly, enforcement of the regulations, a Town responsibility, will 
require more time, effort and money on the Town's part. 

The MDC granted permission for Billerica and Tewksbury to dispose of their septic tank wastes at the MDC man 
hole at the lower end of Woburn Street in Wilmington. The arrangement is temporary and subject to annually 
renewable contracts. Wilmington has such a contract with each Town and receives annual reimbursement of 
$10,000 from each. The MDC requires that each Town monitor the wastes to see that only septage from the thn 
towns is dumped and that the septage meets the MDC effluent regulations. Last year the Board of Water and 
Sewer Commissioners requested funds for the acquisition of land and a small structure to house an attendent, 
as well as additional funds for proper full-time monitoring. 



44 



Cemetery Department 



urials : 



Receipts : 



Residents died in Wilmington 

Residents died elsewhere 

Non-residents 

Cremations 

Babies 

Transfers 



10 
59 
40 
1 
7 
1 



Interments 
Liners 



Foundations 
Setting Markers 
Affidavits 



$ 7,950 
520 
1,077 
200 

28 

$ 9,775 



118 



eserve: 



Trust Fund: 



Sale of Lots 



$ 11,407 



Perpetual Care 



$ 11,350 



egular maintenance was carried on throughout the entire year. During the growing season the mowers were 
oing constantly. Five high school boys were hired during the spring vacation to rake leaves. A number of 
unken graves and winter graves were loamed and seeded. Monuments, tipped over by vandals, were reset by 
emetery men. Four boys from the National Youth Corp. worked for the department for eight weeks in the summer, 
ive hours a day. These boys helped with the mowing, weeding and every day maintenance of the grounds. 

he department plowed snow for the highway department, as well as the cemetery. The walks across the Common 
^ere cleared of snow during the winter months. The men cut brush and wood to make way for expansion. One 
housand three hundred and sixty-six tons of fill were hauled from Cronin's Sand Pit with our two trucks, 
jwo thousand two hundred and thirty-five tons of loam were delivered by Deloury Construction Company. They 
jlso removed many stumps and did grading for expansion. Many foundations were installed for monuments 
(hroughout the year. Maple trees, flowering fruit trees, and shrubs were bought and set out in Sections C, I, 



he beach areas were raked and glass and debris removed to make ready for summer use. Little League Park and 
eteran's Parks were fertilized and seeded. The diamonds at the Town Park and Little League Park were graded 
nd rolled. Bleachers were set out at each park. Little League Park dugouts had new roofs installed, and 
lywood was painted and attached to the fence. 

\c, Louis Nolan, foreman, retired after fifteen years of faithful service to the Town. Many thanks to all 
apartments and town officials for help during the year. 



nd J. 



45 



I 



Authority 



ORGANIZATION 

The Wilmington Housing Authority is authorized by Section 3 of Chapter 121B of the General Laws, as amendec 
MEMBERS 

Mr. George W. Hooper, Chairman 

Mrs. Barbara Larson, Vice Chairman 

Miss Lulu Sanborn, Treasurer 

Mr. Leo Woodside, Assistant Treasurer 

Mrs. Lorraine Brozyna, Secretary 

Mr. Henry E. Borrazzo, Executive Director 

STATUTORY REFERENCE 

1. Housing Authority Law: Section 261 of the General Laws, as amended, 

2. Act of providing Housing for Elderly Persons of Low Income: Chapter 667 of the Acts of 195A, as amende, 



ASSETS 

Administration Fund 

Revolving Fund Advances 
(Savings Acct.) 

Development Cost 
Development Cost Liquidation 
Total Assets 



BALANCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1976 - 667-1 



$ 20,612.58 
6,661.70 

575,000.00 
-135,000.00 
$A67,27A.28 



LIABILITIES 

Employees' Payroll Deductions 

Fixed Liabilities-Grants Auth. 

Debt Service Reserve 
Operating Reserve 
Prior Year Surplus 
Residual Receipts (Deficits) 

Total Liabilities & Reserves 



$ 26: n 

440, 00( DO 

21,57f JO 
8,66( )C 

77]:)1 

(3,99(15 
$ 467,27^ 28 



BALANCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1976 - 705-1 



ASSETS 



Administration Fund 
Tenants Accounts 
Development Cost 
Total Assets 



$ 12,359.14 
100.00 
161,250.06 
$173,709.20 



LIABILITIES 

Fixed Liabilities-Grants Auth. 

Residual Receipts 
(Deficits) 

Total Liabilities & Reserves 



$180,0000 
-6,29C}0 

$173. 70S 20 



uring 1976, the chairman and the executive director continued to seek additional housing for the elderly 
itizens of Wilmington and the vice chairman circulated petitions and encouraged the support of the residents 
or this worthwhile effort. They presented the signed petitions personally to Governor Dukakis and Senator 
ennedy . 

ilmington Housing Authority made all necessary arrangements to participate in the Section 8 Housing Program, 
hich is Federally funded, in an attempt to secure suitable housing for elderly and low- income families, 
ongressman Tsongas was made aware of the housing needs for Wilmington at a conference arranged at the Housing 
uthority with the other members. 

976 saw the long awaited and needed rehabilitation of the septic system and sewerage treatment plant at the 
ousing Authority. 

he Board has sought a mini-bus service to be used for the elderly citizens of Wilmington to provide free 
eneral transportation throughout the Town. A Hot Lunch Program, through the cooperation of Lorraine Brozyna 
nd the Council on Aging, has been developed at Deming Way. 

Modernization Program for replacing underground heating and water pipes throughout the 19-year-old Housing 
uthority will take place in 1977, as well as repairs to roofs and a beautif ication program. These programs 
ill be accomplished through the funding of material by the Wilmington Housing Authority, and the supplying of 
abor through the CETA Program. The Wilmington Housing Authority is totally funded by the Commonwealth of 
assachusetts and is not dependent upon the real estate taxes of the Town of Wilmington. 



Council on Aging 



'his past year has been an exciting one for Wilmington Senior Citizens, due to the hard work of Council members 
ind the total cooperation of the Town Manager's office and the School Department. The first hot lunch program 
^or Seniors in Wilmington was started at the North Intermediate School. Seniors are served lunch daily at the 
xhool, and those who are unable to get out have the lunches delivered to their homes. This long awaited ser- 
'ice to Wilmington's elderly has State approval for reimbursement of funds to the School Department, thus en- 
ibling Seniors to participate for only fifty cents per person. 

Jiother first has been the active membership of Wilmington in the Minute Man Home Care Corporation, which is 
unded by our local Council, fifteen other communities and the Federal government. This social service agency 
las been designed to assist persons sixty years and older to live in the dignity and comfort of their own 
iomes and communities. The agency now provides, information and referral, case management, homemaking and 
:hore services. Minute Man hopes to implement transportation and nutrition services in the near future. 

'he Senior Drop-In Center, which is located at the Wilmington Plaza, has been donated for the seniors' use by 
!r. Mike DeMoulas . This Center is funded through the Council and provides the many social activities which 
re held for Seniors throughout the year. There is also a regular schedule of daily interest activities which 
re held at the Center, many of which are run by the Seniors themselves. 

i 

-'he Council wishes to express their thanks to the many businesses and private organizations which have shown 
incere goodwill towards the Wilmington Seniors throughout the past year. A special note of thanks is extended 
the townspeople of Wilmington who have appropriated the budget which has made possible the Council's success. 



47 



Bicentennial Commission 



\ 

S) 

ill 

The Wilmington Bicentennial Commission was both pleased and honored to have served the people of the Town of ki 
Wilmington during our nation's Bicentennial year and the Town's 246th anniversary of its incorporation. li 

:ii 

Members of the Commission who retired before the Bicentennial Celebrations: Barry Garden, Barbara Cogan, Sarj^i 
Cosman, William Meyer, Marilyn Dornfeld, Cathy Filipowicz and Marge Elia cast a strong foundation and built i 
excellent platform upon which the present Commission performed. The Commission expresses its sincerest appr< 
ation for their efforts. Having inherited this magnificent platform, we could do no less than give our very At 
best performance thereon: j 

it 

January - We started the Bicentennial celebrations with a most successful ball and feast in the main ballroori i{ 
of the NCO Club at Hanscom Air Fore Base. This location was chosen for the beauty of the room, its ability 1| ec 
accommodate a large number of people, and the historical connection between L. G. Hanscom (after whom the bai) 2J 
was named) and Wilmington. 



L. G. Hanscom went through the Wilmington public school system, started the Civil Air Patrol in the United 
States, fought in World War II, and his final resting place is in Wilmington's Wildwood Cemetery. 

Wilmington was declared an official revolutionary town on that occasion. The official ARBA flag was presents 
to the Board of Selectmen and on behalf of the Commission the present chairman accepted a citation from the 
House of Representatives of the Great and General Court of our Commonwealth. A congratulatory letter was re' 
ceived from President Ford. 



te 

w; 
iti 



March - The Commission held an "Ethic Costume" ball and feast at the Wilmington Knights of Columbus hall, 
celebration was certainly a success, but most pleasing was the fact that everyone arrived dressed up as 
"Americans" . 



Hi ■£ 



April - We gave the Council of Churches an assist in planning and holding Easter Sunrise Services on the 
Wilmington High School Field grounds. The Council had printed about 250 programs for the occasion. They wei 
depleted shortly after the gates opened. The crowd exceeded AOO in number and the weather was the best behe! 
that early in the spring in Wilmington in many a year. 



ii! 

Ill- 
r 
,r; 
a- 
ie 
k 



On Student Government Day, the Commission took three members of the High School Bicentennial Committee, ac- 
companied by two members of the League of Women Voters, to visit the historic sites in Concord. En route we 
stopped at Meriam's Corner where one of Wilmington's Companies of Minuteman fought "on that famous day and yci i 
giving the Redcoats their first real good thrashing and turning their orderly retreat into a rout. The inteifi 
of the High School students in our Nation's history impressed us all. One of these students was Marie Michai 
On her eighteenth birthday, on the recommendation of the chairman, Marie was approved by the Board of Select 
men as a member of our Commission making her the youngest town official in the Nation. 



We sponsored the New York stage play "Freedom Train" for all high school students in the Herbert Barrows 
auditorium. 

We gave an assist to our Company of Minutemen on their annual march to Concord by arranging for a horse and 
rider to announce the march of the British and for a firing squad from the Veterans of Foreign Wars to send 
them on their way. 

May - The Commission approved the final design for Wilmington's Official Bicentennial Coin and Plaque. The 
coin is to have both an obverse portraying a Minuteman at Meriam's Corner and a reverse portraying the White- 
field Elm, the Middlesex Canal, the Baldwin Apple Monument and the quotation "Second to None in the Fight fo: 

48 



It; 



Jte: 



'reedom". On request of the Commission the Board of Selectmen adopted this quotation, unanimously, as the 
ifficial Town Slogan. 

'embers of Canal Associations from throughout the nation visited Wilmington to observe the Middlesex Canal, 
'he Commission arranged for the visitors to be serenaded by the area's "Musical Ambassadors" - the Tewksbury- 
Tilmington Elks Crusaders. 

jfith a grant from the Commission our company of Minutemen staged their annual "Capping of the Liberty Tree" 
lageant and parade. It exceeded previous years' parades both as to the number of participants and observers. 

une - With another grant from the Commission a selected group of our company of Minutemen embarked on their 
low historic "Walk to the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia". This event, in our opinion, ranks "Second to None" 
or Bicentennial activities in the nation. 

uly - We started our celebrations on the morning of July 3rd at 10:00 a.m. in the form of the largest parade 
!ver held in Wilmington, replete with bands, floats, antique cars, fire engines aid marching contingents from 
he military, veterans organizations and every fraternal and charitable group in the town. Many distinguished 
uests participated in our parade and were on our reviewing stand. The efforts of the police, fire, school, 
ighway and all other departments cannot be over-emphasized. The parade being over shortly after the noon 
our, a small break was held so that the local weary marchers might be rested and fed at the Veterans' Club 
ouses and the Knights of Columbus Hall. Then it was on to the Council of Churches "Family Olympics", followed 
y the Kiwanis Bean Supper on the common (they exhausted their supply of food) and on to the High School Tennis 
ourts for an all night dance and Bicentennial Vigil. At five minutes of midnight church bells started ring- 
ng, joined later by fire engine sirens and still later by police sirens. At midnight - all quiet. At one 
econd past midnight a 200 round salute was fired by muskets, rifles and cannon accompanied by 1976 roman 
andles. The crowd in the stands then spontaneously sang "Happy Birthday to US." This unplanned, spontaneous 
usic was the most moving of activities observed by the commission. If nothing else it proves that one should 
ever under estimate "We the People" when it comes to love of our nation and dedication to the principles of 
ur founding fathers of 200 years ago. 

ihe Tall Ships Came to Boston and the chairman joined the other, approximately 500 thousand rubber-necking 
lourists for at least a glimpse and the remote possibility of being allowed aboard one of the ships. The 
ines were long but orderly, being kept so with the help of state troopers and ship personnel. The chairman 
intered the line of the Spanish ship Juan Sebastian de Elcano, the home of his ancestors, centuries removed, 
leing fluent in the Spanish tongue and standing next to a Spanish marine who was guarding the gangway - 
leasantries were exchanged. In minutes a ranking officer from the ship whisked the chairman from Wilmington 
nd party through the crowds and aboard the ship as if he were something special (which he was not, other than 
epresenting Wilmington - special enough) . They thought it quite extraordinary that a person of Spanish 
ncestory, still fluent in both the ancient and modern forms of their tongue should be chairman of a Bicenten- 
ial Commission in a town that was "Second to None in the Fight for Freedom". After a brief explanation of 
ilmington's history, they equated the people of our town to the ancient inhabitants of Saragoza, Spain (which) 
own dealt Napoleon his first defeat) . They pointedly emphasized that Juan Sebastian de Elcano was truly the 
irst to circumnavigate the world instead of Magellan, but were polite enough to concede that Magellan would 
lave been had he not died en route and that de Elcano was second in command to the great Portuguese navigator, 
he moment of honor for Wilmington came when the Spanish ship was granted an additional day in port after the 
thers left and the entire Wilmington Bicentennial Commission and all Town Officials were invited aboard the 
hip as guests of the commandant - the only Town and Bicentennial Commission so honored. Due to short notice 
nd prior commitments only the chairman was able to attend. He was assigned two sergeants of Spanish marines 
nd was treated royally. The chairman, in turn, presented Wilmington Bicentennial coins to appropriate person- 
el and officers and a plaque is being forwarded to the Spanish King. Our Bicentennial coins and plaques, to 
he best of our knowledge, are now as far north as Maine, as far south as Florida and as far west as Calif or- 
ia in the United States. Outside of our nation, they are in Canada, Mexico, Spain, Italy, France, England, 
ales, Scotland, Ireland and New Zealand. 

ctober - We were honored by the Tewksbury Bicentennial Commission inasmuch as they requested that we contri- 
ate items for their time capsule which will be opened July 4, 2076. We contributed a Bicentennial coin, a 
laque and a copy of our July 3rd & 4th souvenier brochure as tangible objects. As an intangible we offered 
lur prayers that they would be as free when they opened the capsule as we were when we sealed it. 

Dvember - We held our final Bicentennial ball and feast at L.G. Hanscom Air Force Base and again it was a 
reat success. This time, on behalf of the Commission, the chairman received a citation from the Senate of 
he Commonwealth. It must be noted that previous to this a citation from the governor had been received. 



49 



We made a grant to our company of Minutemen to enable them to acquire their own cannon for ceremonial occa: i, 
By now the barrel has been cast. May it cast its' sound in the greatest town forever. 

December - The second edition of our Bicentennial coin was cast. It is identical to the first edition exc< : 
for size. The second edition was cast in "silver dollar" and "quarter dollar" size and in necklace form oi f 
The coins are of genuine pewter with the 24" rope chain of chrome-plated metal. 

In conclusion, the Wilmington Bicentennial Commission, composed of Fructuoso Talamantes Carrasco (Rudy), 
chairman; David Hill, vice chairman; John Clark, secretary; Joan Maga, Marie Michaud, Robert Brown, Atwood 
Dickson, Robert Boyce and Charles Kelley, wish to thank the people of Wilmington for the privilege, pleasu 
and honor of serving you. We realize that just before and during our Bicentennial was a harrowing time po , 
tically and economically for our nation. However, true to our founding fathers' principles, we have surv: • 
and have proven that our nation is truly, under God, indivisible. We further realize that there still exi; 
detractors of our form of government with their signs, placards, chants and slogans. More important, howe-" 1: 
we feel that the Bicentennial has created a new ground swell of patriotism. A ground swell that will grow ji 
grow until the "Stars & Stripes" flying in the breeze will obliterate the detractors banners and the strain 
of the Star Spangled Banner will drown out their refrain. ...The Best Is Yet To Come, 

i 

i 

i 

Carter Lecture Fund 



On April 7, 1976, the Committee presented Captain Irving Johnson in his "Great Sailing Adventures" showing 
earlier film on an east to west Cape Horn voyage on the "Peking" and a world voyage on the Brigantine "Yanl 

The Committee has invited John Roberts to take us on a trip to "A New Norway" at 8:15 p.m. in the Herbert t 
Barrows Auditorium in the Wilmington High School, Thursday Evening, April 14, 1977. 

One third of Norway lies above the Artie Circle. Thanks to the gulf stream she boasts of summers that are 
warm as those of Great Britain, and winters that provide snow for some of Europe's best skiing. 

Mr. Roberts will show us Ulvik Fjord, a beautiful resort; Stavanger, with her ship building industry; deep 
fishing, and canning; industries of Norway, including giant hydro-electric plants, metallurgical factories 
the nation's efficient lumbering, fishing, and seafaring operations; an interesting look at schools from gi 
schools up to the universities; the famed May 17th parade which is now a tradition in the country; a old ai 
new look at Bergen; Lofoton Islands; the peaceful beauty of the farmlands; North Cape Cruise aboard a trim 
a voyage to the top of Europe; the sun that never sleeps; - Finnmark - home of the Lapps; nomads of the No: 
herding reindeer over barren hills; a visit with a Lapp family; and a midsummer night. 

After intermission, Mr. Roberts will take us to the capital city of Oslo; initial impressions; a visit to 1 
Palace Guard; a family at home; the exciting nightlife, theatre, ballet, symphony and T.V.; museums, art, i 
museum, Sonie Heine Museum; Vigeland Park with its controversial statues; Fredrikstad with its arts and cr£ 
Sertisdahl Valley with ancient costumes and fine silverwork; the birthplace of recreational skiing at Teler 
a Norwegian family celebrating a typical wedding; the mountain resort of Stalheim with its goat herds; a si 
of the road system as we drive along the sides of mountains and dip down into valleys of incredible beauty; 
Balestrad, a popular resort on Songefjord; Olden which is located on the North Fjord, the beginning of a ti 
to a great glacier at the tremendous source of Norway's water power; Geiranger, one of the most photograph( 
fjords in the world; a final look at Norway, her people, countryside, and way of life ends a memorable joui 
through the land of the modern vikings. 

Through the efforts of the High School Administration, Mr. Roberts will present this same program to the Hj 
School students on the following day. 

Carter programs are free to the residents of Wilmington . 



50 



Redevelopment Authority 



le Wilmington Redevelopment Authority's continuing progress with the Jewell Industrial Park on Eames Street has 
(Suited in the subsurfacing of 600 feet of Jewel Drive. 

Ith gas and Town water being added this year, the Industrial Park now has all utilities. 

le Wilmington Redevelopment Authority anticipates continued sales of several more acres in the Industrial Park 
I the near future and will strive to encourage industry which will be beneficial both economically and ecolog- 
;ally to the community. 

le Board is appreciative of the valuable contributions made by William F. Butt and is sorry to see him leave 
ter so many years of dedicated service to the Town of Wilmington. 



Sealer of Weights & Measures 



lis is a list of all weighing and measuring devices, scales, 
Jaled, not sealed, and condemned during the year 1976. 


meters, pumps. 


and weights 


that were tested. 




Adjusted 


Sealed 


Not Sealed 


Condemned 


llances, Scales, Weights 


73 


168 


21 


29 


ipacity Measures 


26 


53 


26 


18 


Lquid Measuring Meters 


67 


189 


12 


41 


:her Measuring Devices 


34 


38 


21 


20 


repackaged Foods Reweighed 


3,925 









51 



•1 
1 



Jury List 



(■«■ Indicates Married Woman) 
(Revised - August 1 , 1 976) 



NAME 

Alexander, Kenneth C . 

Allard, Russell A. 

Allen, Frankline E. 

Arbing, Helen 

Arvanitis, John P. 

Bahia, Walter 

Barber, Ronald J. 

Bauman, John C. 

Bennett, Gertrude H. 

Bicknell, Raymond D. 

Booth, Raymond C. 

Bova, Paul J . 

Branscombe, Robert E. 
•«Brans field, Marion E. 

Breakey, Barbara K. 

Brennan, Paul R. 
-x-Brennan, Ruth M. 

Bromander, Sidney J . 

Bruno, Gerard A., Jr. 

Burton, Richard H. 

Capone, Donald W. 
■5i-Catalano, Alice V. 

Ghamberlin, Winston S., Jr. 

Clark, Sharon 
*Close, Beverley 

Collins, James J. 

Collins, Lawrence F. 

Corey, Anthony G., Jr. 

Cornish, Robert H. 

Crane, Roy B. 

Crawford, Ralph M. 

Crowe 11, Albert E. 

Cuoco, John 
■i<-Currier, Doris 

Curtis, Ruth A. 

Dahlberg, George W. 

D'Aiuto, James F. 

Davey, James J. 

DeJongh, Jeriy 

DeLisle, Helen E. 

DelNinno, Silvio V.. 
■?J-De Wilde, Nancy C. 



RESIDENCE 

35 Burnap Street 

33 Clark Street 

86 Burlington Avenue 

18 Dobson St. 

68 Middlesex Avenue 

148 Marcia Road 

253 Middlesex Avenue 

3h Kenwood Avenue 

2I4.9 Middlesex Avenue 

831 Main Street 

38 Lowell Street 

15 Salem Street 

8 Maple Street 

15 Glendale Circle 

63 Middlesex Avenue 

15 Clark Street 

U30 Middlesex Avenue 

I Hilltop Road 
37 Oakdale Road 

6 Harold Avenue 

20 Hillside Way 

12 Cedar Crest Road 

II Glen Road 

23 Floradale Avenue 

21 Oakdale Road 
1; Maple Street 
10 Hamlin Lane 
67 Salem Street 
27 Hillside Way 
30 Mac Donald Road 
3 Chase Road 

23 Hillside Way 

290 Middlesex Avenue 

10 Thiirston Avenue 

7 Shady Lane Drive 
Mill Road 

165 Federal Street 
1 Fairmeadow Road 
32 Salem Street 
15 Beljnont Avenue 
it Pond Street 
322 Woburn Street 



OCCUPATION 

Gas Station Attendant 

Journeyman, Electrician 

Contract Consultant 

Packer 

Plasterer 

Postal Clerk 

Traffic Manager 

Pres . Slumberland 

Secretary 

Shipper 

Salesman 

Design Draftsman 
Chemical WDrker 
Jr. Clerk Typist 
Secretary 
Truck Driver 
At home 

Machine Shop Supervisor 
Examiner 

Casualty Underwriter 

Insurance Underwriter 

Cafeteria TflJbrker 

Unemployed 

Secretary 

Bookeeper 

Shipper 

Insurance Agent 
Mfg. Supervisor 
Purchasing Agent 
Project Engineer 
Line Supervisor 
Charger Sales & Service 
Salesman 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. 
Q. C. Inspector 
Machinist 
Senior Foreman 
Teletype Inspector 
Lab. Tech. 
Secretary 
Salesman 
Saleswoman 



52 



RESIDENCE 



OCCUPATION 





Coffee Servxce 




Foreman Welder 


1 T«ri=> o 4- Q4- v»c» Q-H 


Precision Inspector 




ACOOLLElucUll* 


Lj-ii iiQajTib ooresu 


oexx — eiupxoyc Q. 


iVJ uIllCLL IJU jV OOX O 


■Ro-n n^l c; Pn 


M T f!l T.1~K» <^ Q CM- n^^!i4- 


r orciridii 






U ilJ_XXiD_LU.c WdV 


A OTTlV» 1 

iioocIUUXcX 




TVi caV^n 




1 1 t-; ti xlfC* M-*- ^ ^^^^^ *^ '' ^ 


1 ft HalrH^il Rnp H 


n.o Uot; W-Lx c 


1ft nalrH^I P "RnaH 




"5 To "r>o T? Q 


xXOLl» vju.pc:x vxoux 


^ ph n n 1 "P p p t. 




7 D LLl rilialTl O OX o c L/ 


OucLLX DUycX 


10 CcLrtep LcLn6 


UneiTiployed 


^c. recLeraj- ooreeu 


Flight Crew Scheduling 


111 Muse Avenue 


Unemploye d 


1 J unurcn ot/reeo 


Graphic Asst . 


ou riiucLLeoex Avenue 


Dod-XX OcOXcOcLXy 


po riain ot.reet. 


Asst . Credit Mgr . 


rarJcer oureet 


Q. C« Secretary 


2^ Washington Avenue 


Mechanic 


1 St rout Avenue 


Q . C . Manager 


1 iL oCcLLoniio JJrxve 


Engxneeidjig Mgr . 


KLlmarnock Street 


Metal Spinner 


I baiem Street 


Unemploye d 


7 Marion Street 


Plant Engineer 


18 Strout Avenue 


Director Drug Center 


ij5 Butters Row 


Dir. Senior Citizens 


1 c iiXoyu xtoaa 


Information Clerk 


JO (jaKuaj. e ito ao. 


Mechanic 


1 7 Kenwood. Avenue 


Sr • Systems Analyst 


1 21). Shawsheen Avenue 


Service Manager 


Op oa±eni oTireeo 


iteiiaxx oaxes Mgr • 


p oedxoru. ooxcco 


unciTipxo^uu. 


1 2 Lawrence Street 


Test Engineer 


i| Shac^ Lane Ilrive 


Unemployed 


( onac^ Lane urive 


oamson's ' 


1 r-L 1 1 1 llg ItOdU. 


ric Octgx cipilXC 1 Oil • 


1 JA rarKer Street 


JM . Hi. iex & iel. 


113 Grove Avenue 


Retired 


113 Grove Avenue 


Retired 


lA State Street 


Eng. Analyst 


23 School Street 


Jr. Civil Engineer 


3 Ridge Road 


Res . Claims Adj . 


3k Glen Road 


Claijns Examiner 


k9 Glen Road 


Corres. Auditor 


3 Randolph Road 


Account Administrator 


21 Dadant Drive 


At Home 


7 Marcia Road 


P. T. student 


100 Grove Avenue 


Housewife 


2^9 Main Street 


Secretary 


8 Amherst Road 


Letter Carrier 


8 Amherst Road 


Housewife 


9 Loumac Road 


Retired 


232 Lowell Street 


ELec . Assembler 



53 



Jury List; (continued) 



NAME RESIDMCE OCCUPATION 



Mader, Norbert K. 


6 Dpury Lane 


Chemist 


It 


MaglianOj John J • 


6 Martens Street 


Office Mgr. 


it 


Manchester J Charles E. 


28 Kenwood Avenue 


Te ch . Illustrat r 




Mar chant , Debra 


h Lloyd Road 


Accounts Payable Clerh 


i 


Mardney, William A. 


63 Lawrence Street 


Unempl oye d 




Martin, Diane F . 


21 Pinewood Road 


Secret aiy 


t 


Masse J Maxine M» 


1 9 Carter Lane 


Packer 




*McCann, Maryann 
McCarthy, Joseph F. 


61; Lawrence Street 


Housewife 


( 


lij. Birchwood Road 


Trans. Asst. Mgr. 


I 
<f 


McFayden, James W. 


16 Lawrence Street 


Assoc • Manager 


i 
\ 


McHugh, Robert L. 


31 Glen Road 


Cost Estimator 


i 


McQuaid, Everett P. 


71 Middlesex Avenue 


Elec. Engineer 


i 


Medico, Elsie L. 


112 Grove Avenue 


Retired 




Meegan, Alfred N. 


I;8 McDonald Road 


Indust . lift mech. 




Merid.ll, George B. 


368 Chestnut Street 


Unemploye d 


t 


-)^selis, Lillian T. 


l^h Federal Street 


Hou sewife 




Morelli, Alfred F. 


7 Webber Street 


Heliarc welder 


* 


Morse, George A. Sr. 


825 Main Street 


Foreman 


1 


Moiilton, Lloyd G. 


2 Meadow Lane 


Sheetmetal Worker 


1 


Murray, Audrey E. 


173 Wildwood Street 


At Home 


1 


■K-Murray, Evangeline E. 


2 Laurel Avenue 


At Home 




Oikle, Philip A. 


3 Fletcher Lane 


Q. C. & Audit Eng. 




O'Rourke, Frank T. 


15 Birchwood Road 


Yard Foreman 




•K-O 'Rourke, Mary A. 


15 Birchwood Road 


P. T. Secretary 




Otis, Albert P., Jr. 


2k Railroad Avenue 


General Manager 




Pease, Robert A. 


257 Middlesex Avenue 


Elec . circuit Eng. 




Penney, Marilyn Y. 


3 Glen view Road 


Order Filler 




Peters, George A. 


1il Fairmeadow Road 


Reprod. artist 




-x-Peterson, Eleanor A. 


5 Dniry Lane 


Fundr ai s ing 




Pote, Ira T. 


715 Wo burn Street 


Site Supervisor 






JiD T.nwpl 1 5?t.rppt. 


Sii'nPT*vn snT* He qp mu 




Proctor, Richard W. 


33 R Melrose Avenue 


Purchasing Agent 




Quandt, Roger W. 


214. Pershing Street 


Prog. Supr. Data Proc. 




•^x-OniTin Mar caret 


2? 'P'PPdPTH pk" Dr*i VP 


TTisiiT*anpp l^TviVpT* 






?n lAj^st .st.TPpt 


TTnpTTTn"! nvpf^ 

U 110111 J. 1^ V C 




"Recan nnmelinf; .T . 

Xbw^Mll, \J\JJ, 1 1 1 O U . 


'^ St . Paul St r pet 


MppVi _ TTTSnpf^tnT* 

ll^Wll . 1 




Rpinbolt P.b^iT»1 PS 


1 wL/X U- v_/ ^ »V W L/" XUkJClU 


XX IX IV<XX .i- V v> X 




Ring^ John S.^ Jr. 


Cuiminglisiri Street 


Systems Programmer 








Tpst Grmin Tf^adPT* 




Rogers, Walter A. 


2ii Shady Lane Drive 


Custodian 




Ronan, Bernard J. 


197 Middlesex Avenue 


Janitor 




Russell, Esther L. 


10 Wildwood Street 


Town Clerk 




Russell, William H. 
Shea, Christopher H. 


10 midwood Street 


Retired 




20 Lawrence Street 


Computer Programmer 




•K-Sheehan, Ibrothy T. 


8 Concord Street 


Housewife 




Smith, Richard J. 


7 Dorothy Avenue 


Design analyst 




•5«-Smith, Ruth K. 


15 Laurel Avenue 


Waitress 




Spinney, Chester R., Jr. 


3 Pineridge Road 


Semi -retired-grocery 




Sprague, George E. 


1^82 Middlesex Avenue 


Engineer 




Stevens, Francis W. 


195 Federal Street 


Unemployed 




*Stratton, Barbara L. 


67 Lawrence Street 


Research Interviewer 




Stygles, Daniel J., Sr. 


18 Jones Avenue 


R. R. Signal Maintainej 




Sullivan, John P. 


Ik Crest Avenue 


Grocery clerk 




Taylor, Raymond L., Jr. 


189 Wobum Street 


Prod. Supervisor 




Thatcher, Norman C. 


15 Fair view Avenue 


Computer Programmer 




Theriault, Leo P. 


7 Lawrence Street 


Train Conductor 





54 



I 



'y List: (continued) 



NAME 


RESIDENCE 


OCCUPATION 


..dsi-: r, Sidney A. 


118 Nichols Street 


C omput e r Te ch • 


LgiliOj James A. 


230 Lowell Street 


Adm. SuDTilv Tprh 


)ut, Robert T. 


1i(. Lawrence Street 


Retired 


hmbley, Nomaji C. 


12 Marjorie Road 


Accountant 


'tus, John T. 


Ridfe RnaH 


SimPT^Tri s riT* 


3Conti, Anthony 


28 Nass^ni A\rpmip 


P (=>+■. "1 T*P(i 


Ig, IdSJ-liam R. 


lj.1 Butters Row 


Body Shop Mgr. 


Lsh, Catherine L. 


37 West Street 


Housewife 


'd, Priscilla R. 


It Fitz Terrace 


Sr. Clerk 


)d, Carolyn C. 


18A Mystic Avenue 


Cost Clerk 


)dbiiry, Richard B. 


16 Roberts Road 


Serv. Manager 


)ds, Marjorie L. 


23 Beacon Street 


Claim Investigator 


'ringham, Sairley A. 


22 Marcus Road 


Adm. Secretaiy 


ikowski, Robert M. 


127 Middlesex Avenue 


Conputer Operator 


itile, Thomas W. 


Shawsheen Avenue 


Sr. Engineering aid 


mg, Donald 


8 State Street 


Self-employed 


;cagnini, Lorenzo A. 


305 Middlesex Avenue 


Press Operator 


.no, Arthur L. 


20 Linda Road 


Sr. Engineer 


loni, Elizabeth H. 


8 Pershing Street 


Secretary 


rerson, Barbara D. 


310 Middlesex Avenue 


At Home 



Dog Officer 



Dogs Licensed 1766 

Dogs Confined 271 

Complaints Covered 3691 

Court Complaints 245 

Court Fines Paid $1900 

Dogs Disposed Of 448 

Dogs Killed By Cars 64 



Residents Notified For Licenses 1095 



55 



Accepted Streets 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH 



DATE (s) ACCEPTEE 



Adams Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Parker Street 


2,915 


1908 




Adelaide Street 


from 


Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 


666 


1976 




Aldrich Road 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


6,740 


1894 




Allen Park Drive 


from 


Fairmont Avenue to Fairmont Avenue 


2,319 


1971 




Andover Street 


from 


Salem Street 


180 


1894 




Andover Street 


from 


Andover Line to beyond Woburn Street 


11,300 


1894 


1970 


Anthony Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Catherine Avenue 


300 


1966 




Apollo Drive 


from 


Charlotte Road to Draper Drive 


300 


1971 




Arlene Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Dorothy Avenue 


789 


1966 




Auburn Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


755 


1945 




Ayotte Street 


from 


Westdale Avenue to Crest Avenue 


240 


1947 




Baker Street 


from 


Brand Avenue to beyond Phillips Avenue 


684 


1945 




Baland Road 


from 


Ballardvale Street 


540 


1972 




Ballardvale Street 


from 


Salem Street to Route 125 


965 


1894 




Ballardvale Street 


from 


Route 125 to Andover Line 


12,000 


1894 




Bancroft Street 


from 


Liberty Street 


400 


1952 




Barbara Avenue 


from 


Anthony Avenue to Dorothy Avenue 


850 


1966 




Beacon Street 


from 


Church Street to Belmont Avenue 


970 


1915 




Beech Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Byron Street 


1 ,005 


1947 




Beeching Avenue 


from 


Cunningham Street to Faulkner Avenue 


440 


1959 




Belmont Avenue 


from 


Columbia Street to State Street 


980 


1933 




Benson Road 


from 


Radcliff Road to Tewksbury Line 


616 


1971 




Biggar Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Ring Avenue 


1,282 


1975 




Birchwood Road 


from 


Shady Lane Drive 


1,197 


1952 




Birchwood Road 


from 


Judith Road 


400 


1953 




Boutwell Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 


4,144 


1894 


1960 


Brand Avenue 


from 


Bridge Lane 


510 


1933 


1943 


Brand Avenue 


from 


Baker Street to beyond Wisser Street 


950 


1933 


1943 


Brattle Street 


from 


Massachusetts Avenue to Garden Avenue 


1,066 


1945 




Brentwood Avenue 


from 


Woburn Street to Woodside Avenue 


1,017 


1938 




Bridge Lane 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


455 


1894 




Bridge Lane 


from 


Main Street to beyond Brand Avenue 


754 


1894 




Broad Street 


from 


King Street 


1,377 


1954 




Burlington Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Burlington Line 


8,588 


1894 




Burnap Street 


from 


Grove Avenue 


1,145 


1953 




Burnap Street 


from 


Winchell Road 


484 


1945 




Burt Road 


from 


Cedar Street to beyond Water Street 


1,653 


1945 


1946 


Butters Row 


from 


Main Street to Chestnut Street 


3,577 


1894 




Buzzell Drive 


from 


Draper Drive to Evans Drive 


600 


1971 




Canal Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Burt Road 


1,505 


1939 


1955 


Carolyn Road 


from 


North Street to Marcia Road 


1,268 


1960 


1971 


Carson Avenue 


from 


Marie Drive to beyond Hathaway Road 


1,017 


1961 




Carter Lane 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Norfolk Avenue 


1,411 


1957 




Catherine Avenue 


from 


Anthony Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


1,000 


1966 




Cedar Street 


from 


Burt Road to Harris Street 


687 


1945 





56 




STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE (s) ACCEPTED 



dar Crest Road 
ntral Street 
andler Road 
apman Avenue 
arlotte Road 
ase Road 
estnut Street 
urch Street 
ark Street 
chrane Road 
lumbia Street 
acord Street 
tigress Street 
Dk Avenue 
Dlidge Road 
rey Avenue 
Ctage Street 
ist Avenue 
3SS Street 
mingham Street 
press Street 

lant Drive 
/is Road 
/ton Road 
LI Drive 
json Street 
rchester Street 
rothy Avenue 
iper Drive 
iry Lane 
)lin Avenue 
liton Road 

les Street 
jards Road 
70od Road 
rson Street 
;lewood Drive 
ins Drive 

rfield Road 
.rmeadow Road 
.nnont Avenue 
.rview Avenue 
leuil Drive 
ilkner Avenue 

Street 
eral Street 
guson Road 
radale Avenue 
dham Road 
est Street 
derick Drive 

n Road 

ndale Circle 
nview Road 
ing Road 
ce Drive 
nd Street 



from Pinewood Road to Judith Road 


1,100 


1963 


from Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 


552 


1950 


from Adams Street to Kelley Road 


400 


1957 


from Hathaway Road to Sheridan Road 


1,575 


1951 


from Gunderson Road to beyond Apollo Drive 


859 


1971 


from Hathaway Road 


297 


1953 


from Burlington Avenue to Woburn Line 


11,480 


1894 


from Main Street to Middlesex Avenue 


4,285 


1894 


from Main Street to Church Street 


2,470 


1894 


from Forest Street to Wabash Road 


800 


1947 


from Church Street to beyond Belmont Avenue 




1 n AO 


from Federal Street to North Reading Line 


5,803 


1894 


from Forest Street to Burlington Line 


977 


1939 


from Main Street 


813 


1946 


from Hathaway Road 


270 


1951 


from Canal Street to Grand Street 


366 


1951 


from Main Street 


927 


1954 


from Ayotte Street 


558 


1947 


from Main Street to Lowell Street 


697 


1894 


from Salem Street to Beeching Avenue 


2,447 


1944 


from Glen Road 


260 


1951 


from North Street to North Street 


1 ,760 


1964 


from Main Street 


500 


1952 


from Hathaway Road 


170 


1951 


from Burlington Avenue 


1,794 


1958 


from Glen RoaJ to beyond Garden Avenue 


1,402 


1954 


from Billerica Line 


1,214 


1951 


from Arlene Avenue to Barbara Avenue 


1,490 


1960 


from Gunderson Road to Evans Drive 


1 ,560 


1959 


from Glen Road to School Street 


633 


1963 


from Main Street 


500 


1951 


from Nassau Avenue 


649 


1956 


from Main Street to Woburn Street 


3,200 


1894 


from Forest Street to beyond Baldwin Road 


450 


1947 


from Forest Street 


642 


1968 


from Faulkner Avenue to Oakwood Road 


590 


1951 


from Kenwood Drive 


455 


1971 


from Gunderson Road to Draper Drive 


2,071 


1971 


from Main Street 


1,299 


1946 


from Nichols Street to Nichols Street 


2,328 


1958 


from Malloy Road 


952 


1971 


from State Street 


648 


1933 


from Massachusetts Avenue to beyond Harvard Avenue 


790 


1950 


from Glen Road to Jacobs Street 


1,946 


1944 


from Glen Road to Garden Avenue 


714 


1938 


from Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


5,740 


1894 


from Shawsheen Avenue 


1,073 


1967 


from Burlington Avenue 


627 


1970 


from North Reading Line 


3,714 


1971 


from Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 


4,100 


1894 


from Salem Street 


1,070 


1966 


from Middlesex Avenue to Main Street 


6,870 


1894 


from Glen Road to Lawrence Street 


1,304 


1952 


from Suncrest Avenue 


365 


1959 


from Park Street to Marcus Road 


941 


1956 


from Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Melody Lane 


2,514 


1966 


from Corey Avenue 


815 


1952 



1971 



1969 



1933 



1953 1952 



1971 



1971 



1953 
1945 



1976 



57 



STREET 




T ^ A Tt T i\ XT 

LOCATION 


LENGTH 


TV A TIT? / — . \ 

DATE {Sj 


ACCl 


Grant Street 


from 


Federal Street 


/oO 


1 n / o 

1943 




Grove Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Lake Street 


4,147 


1910 




Grove Street 


from 


Reading Line 


120 


1957 




Gunderson Road 


from 


Marie Drive to beyond Evans Drive 


1 , 506 


1959 


1966 


Hamlin Lane 


from 


Lawrence Street 




1 Q 




Hanson Road 


from 


Woouland Koad 


ojo 


iyoy 




Hardin Street 


from 


Aldrich Road to Jaquith Road 




lyjL 




Harnden Street 


from 


nam otreet to uien Koaa 


Ann 






Harold Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Reed Street 


i. ,jLZ. 


1 y / X 




Harris Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Cedar Street 


806 


1945 




Harvard Avenue 


from 


Main Street to River Street 


430 


1951 




Hathaway Road 


from 


Woburn Street to Evans Drive 


J , / / U 


1 Q 1 


19 jj 










1 QT 1 

iy / i 




Hawthorne Road 


from 


Woburn Street 


z JU 


1 Q c;£ 
lyDO 




High Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


3,585 


1894 




Hillside Way 


from 


Chestnut Street to Burlington Line 


2,230 


1914 




Hilltop Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


364 


1 n c n 

1959 




Hobson Avenue 


from 


Pine Avenue to beyond Wisser Street 


1 ,560 


1945 


1951 


Hopkins Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3 , 051 


ion/ 

1894 


1972 


Industrial Way 


from 


Woburn Street to West Street 


4 , 430 


1974 




Jaquith Road 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1 ,398 


1938 


1949 


Jere Road 


from 


Fairmeadow Road to Fairmeadow Road 


1,248 


1968 




Jones Avenue 


from 


Glen Road 


717 


1940 




Judith Road 


from 


Cedar Crest Road to Birchwood Road 


/. f\f\ 
400 


1953 




Kelley Road 


1 rom 


Chandler Road 


Q O 


1 Q C7 

iy 5/ 




Kendall Street 


from 


Aldrich Road to Blanchard Road 


1 , 4<c0 


1 n / c 

1945 




Kenwood Avenue 


from 


Woburn Street to beyond Englewood Drive 


1 "7 O C 
I , / /.D 


1 n "7 r» 
19/0 


1 m 1 
19/ i 


Kiernan Avenue 


from 


Lowell Street to beyond Naples Road 


69 J 


1 Q Q 
i9D!3 




Kilmarnock Street 


from 


West Street to beyond Morgan Road 


1 Q A n 
1 ,oW 


io94 




King Street 


from 


Glen Road to Broad Street 


2 , 400 


1940 


1945 


Kirk Street 


from 


Main Street 


575 


1951 




Lake Street 


from 


Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


3,855 


1894 




Lang Street 


from 


Bancroft Street 


409 


1952 




Laurel Avenue 


from 


Parker Street to Molloy Road 


659 


1950 




Lawrence Court 


from 


Lawrence Street 


728 


1956 




Lawrence Street 


from 


Glen Road to Shady Lane Drive 


4,013 


1956 




Ledgewood Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


383 


1959 




Lexington Street 


from 


Cunningham Street to Morningside Drive 


714 


1974 




Liberty Street 


from 


Federal Street 


740 


1943 




Lincoln Street 


from 


Federal Street 


720 


1943 




Linda Road 


from 


High Street to beyond Pineridge Road 


1 , 760 


1950 




Lloyd Road 


from 


Main Street 


1 ,050 


1951 




Lockwood Road 


from 


Ballardvale Street 


977 


1957 




Longview Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


650 


1959 




Loumac Road 


from 


Drury Lane 


510 


1963 




Lowell Street 


from 


Main Street to Reading Line 


1 A ICO 


ion/. 




Liuweij. otXccL rarK 


from 


LtOwexi otreet 




1 QDA 




Mackey Road 


from 


Federal Street 


250 


1943 




Magazine Road 


from 


Wisser Street 


320 


1973 




Magazine Street 


from 


Tap 1 in Avenue 


190 


1973 




Main Street 


from 


Tewksbury Line to Woburn Line 


21,387 


1894 




Marcia Road 


from 


North Street to beyond Carolyn Road 


2,806 


1962 


1971 


Marcus Road 


from 


Gowing Road 


2,315 


1958 




Marie Drive 


from 


Woburn Street to beyond Gunderson Road 


1,525 


1961 


1966 


Marion Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to beyond Clifton Street 


1,876 


1945 




Marjorle Road 


from 


Main Street 


1,392 


1951 





58 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE (s) ACCEPTED 



issachusetts Avenue 


from 


Main Street to beyond Brattle Street 


810 


1945 


:Donald Road 


from 


Salem Street 


2,621 


1944 


^adow Lane 


f r om 






1 Q 

i J J / 


JJ.OU.y IjcLiit: 


from 






1 QAA 


Lddlesex Avenue 


r rom 




19 1 AD 


1 RQA 


Lies Street 


from 


Main Street to Hobson Avenue 




1 QA '^ 


^lier Koaa 


from 


uxen Koaa 


JO 


1 QA 


)ore Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Wedgewood Avenue 




1 QA7 

i y D / 


)rningside Drive 


from 


Lexington Street to Fairfield Road 


693 


1974 


)rse Avenue 


from 


Woburn Street to beyond Lawn Street 


1,360 


1939 


fstic Avenue 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


jy o 


i yuo 


issau Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Dunton Road 


1 ^ AA 
i , JDO 




ithan Road 


from 


Senpek Road 


i ,Uj/ 


1 Q7 1 


Lchols Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3,801 


1894 


.ckerson Avenue 


from 


West Street 


953 


1947 


)rfolk Avenue 


from 


Carter Lane to Nassau Avenue 


dH 


iy jf 


)rth Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Marcia Road 


Q QIC 

J , DID 




inn Road 


from 


K.eiiey Koaa 


o 1 /. 
Zi't 


1 Q A 


iK Dtreeu 


from 


C 1 1 i-\m C 4- -V- i-t /-I 4- 

baiem b cr eet 


'J Q 
J J J 


1 OR1 

iyji 


ilcdale Road 


from 


onort otreet. lo juaxnn ivoaa 




ly 


ikridge Circle 


from 


Gowing Road to Cowing Road 


1 7 1C\ 


iy jo 


ikwood Road 


from 


Main Street to beyond Emerson Street 


ouu 


1 QAA 

lyf 


.son Street 


from 


unurcn ocreet 


1 99 


ly J/ 


1 C 1" Q 


L rom 


woDurn oLieet. to inoll-h ivcciaxng Ltxnc 




1 ML 
X oy H 


II, l\.cL O LL L 


from 


J_iUw cX X OLLccL L(J JjXddN-o UULlC OLlCCL 


9 nnn 


1 007 

X 7 U / 


itricla Circle 


from 


Dell Drive 


595 


1958 


frshing Street 


from 


Federal Street 


720 


1943 


Lxllips Avenue 


from 


Wild Avenue to beyond Baker Street 


1 "^1 Q 


1 QAA 


filing Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


Q 


1 Q '^Q 

xyjy 


.ne Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Hobson Avenue 




1 QA l^ 

xy't J 


.neridge Road 


from 


North Street to Linda Road 


Q 1 A 
y if 


1 QAfl 

i you 


.neview Road 


from 


Lobait otreet to Aaexman icoaa 




1 Q ^'X 

xy jj 


.newood Road 


from 


Shady Lane Drive to Oakdale Road 


i , JOf 


xyDf 


.easant Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Linda Road 


7 cn 


X y Dz 


Wder House Circle 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


1 iU 


ly jf 


"Ogress Way 


from 


Industrial Way 


jU 


1 Q7 /■ 

X y / 4 


idclxrf Road 


from 


South Street to Benson Road 


c c 


1 Q7 1 

xy / i 


lilroad Avenue 


from 


Clark Street 




1 Qno 

xyuy 


sdwood Terrace 


from 


Kenwood Avenue 


645 


1970 


sed Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Harold Avenue 


1,090 


1971 


.chmond Street 


from 


Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


I y oUU 


ly / J 


Idge Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


Q t R 




^ng Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Biggar Avenue 


i , iDU 


iy / 3 


iver Street 


from 


Massachusetts Avenue to Harvard Avenue 


/.CO 


lyoz 


iberts Road 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Burlington Avenue 


1 1 
i , oOi 


lyt) / 


♦llins Road 


from 


Marion Street to Fenway Street 




1 Q 


)Osevelt Road 


from 


Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1 ,980 


1946 


•ute 62 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Salem Street 


3,343 


1958 


lyal Street 


from 


Salem Street 


1,043 


1951 


ilem Street 


from 


Tewksbury Line to beyond Ballardvale Street 


8,895 


1894 


^lem Street 


from 


North Reading line to beyond Woburn Street 


6,475 


1894 


^altrito Drive 


from 


Salem Street 


785 


1974 


ihool Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to beyond Drury Lane 


1,139 


1915 


inpek Road 


from 


Wildwood Street to Nathan Road 


280 


1971 


well Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


300 


1955 


lady Lane Drive 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Lawrence Street 


2,904 


1950 



1919 



1954 



1963 



1958 



59 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH 



DATE (s) ACCEPTl 



Shawsheen Avenue 
Sherburn Place 
Sheridan Road 
Sherwood Road 
Silver Lake Avenue 
Sprucewood Road 
State Street 
Strout Avenue 
Suncrest Avenue 
Swain Road 

Taft Road 
Tap 1 in Avenue 
Taplin Avenue 
Temple Street 
Thrush Road 
Thurston Avenue 
Truman Road 

Unnamed Street 
Upton Court 

Veranda Avenue 
Virginia Road 

Walker Street 
Warren Road 
Washington Avenue 
Webber Street 
Wedgewood Avenue 
West Street 
Westdale Avenue 
Wicks Circle 
Wightman Road 
Wild Avenue 
Wildwood Street 
Williams Avenue 
Wilson Street 
Wilton Drive 
Winchell Road 
Wing Road 
Wisser Street 
Woburn Street 
Woodland Road 



from beyond Richard Street to Billerica Line 

from Shawsheen Avenue 

from Woburn Street to Hathaway Road 

from Forest Street to Cochrane Road 

from Lake Street to Dexter Street 

from Shady Lane Drive 

from Belmont Avenue to Fairview Avenue 
from Lowell Street 
from West Street to Ledgewood Road 
from Burlington Avenue to Forest Street 

from Boutwell Street to Swain Road 

from Wisser Street 

from Baker Street 

from Church Street 

from Salem Street to Marie Drive 

from Church Street to beyond Kidder Place 

from Hathaway Road 

from Salem Street to Andover Street 
from Andover Street 

from Main Street 

from North Reading Line to North Reading Line 
from Main Street 

from Wightman Road to Tewksbury Line 
from Clark Street to Stone Street 
from Burlington Avenue 
from Moore Street 

from Woburn Street to Reading Line 

from West Street 

from Everett Avenue 

from Warren Road to Tewksbury Line 

from Grove Avenue 

from Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 

from Main Street 

from Federal Street 

from Shawsheen Avenue 

from Grove Avenue to Burnap Street 

from Woburn Street 

from Main Street to Brand Avenue 

from Andover Street to Woburn Line 

from Lowell Street 



11,845 
723 
1,021 
4A5 
455 
690 
315 
908 
1,246 
2,290 

1,986 
461 
900 
214 
400 
623 
300 

470 
500 

847 
1,105 

423 
97 

1,650 
677 
476 

8,372 

1,211 
533 
239 

1,050 

5,920 
706 
760 

1,151 
193 
746 

1,146 
23,122 

1,174 



1894 
1975 
1951 
1971 
1954 
1952 
1933 
1955 
1954 
1922 

1938 
1946 
1946 
1911 
1961 
1907 
1953 

1958 
1894 

1916 
1954 

1958 
1954 
1920 
1969 
1967 
1894 
1942 
1971 
1954 
1910 
1894 
1940 
1943 
1966 
1945 
1958 
1950 
1894 
1969 



1971 



1929 




Traffic Supervisors - l\/lemorial Day 
60 



Board of Appeals 



]ase #1- 


-76 


Domenic 


V. 


]ase #2- 


-76 



Tutela 



Villiam & Carole Flores 



Reason for Appeal 



To acquire a variance to build a garage with the required 
reserve side yard at 18 School Street. 



To obtain a variance to erect an addition to the existing 
dwelling within the required reserve side and front yard 
area at 45 Main Street. 



Decision 



Denied 



Granted 



:ase #3-76 

Carlson Sales Corp. 

Curt K. Carlson, Agent 

base #4-76 



John T. Spinelli 
]harles Guleserian, 
^gent 

:ase #5-76 
luth Cuthill 



:ase #6-76 



talter C. Godfrey 



:ase #7-76 



Walter & 
Jowyrda 



Jane 



:ase #8-76 

Chomas & Elaine Carroll 
jJary Edson, Agent 



:ase #9-76 
foyce Brisbois 



To acquire a variance to install a sign within the required 
reserve front yard at 287 Main Street. 



To acquire a variance to erect an Industrial Building with- 
in the required front yard having less than the required 
number of parking spaces at 240 Andover Street. 



To obtain a variance to subdivide a lot into two non- 
conforming lots, both having insufficient depth and area 
on Cunningham and Lexington Streets. 



To acquire a variance and/or a special permit in accordance 
with Section III-4-B5 for the retail sale of ice cream or 
similar product at 316 Main Street. 



To acquire a variance to erect a structure within the re- 
quired reserve rear and side yard at 7 Davis Road 



To acquire a variance and/or a special permit to establish 
a homeowner's occupation for the purpose of providing a 
"Telephone Answering Service" at 4 Pinewood Road. 



To acquire a variance to erect three single family dwell- 
ings on multi-acre lots having insufficient frontage at 
14 Boutwell Street. 



Denied 



Denied 



Denied 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



;ase #10-76 

Fred & Carlo DiCenso 
vtty. Siegal, Agent 



To acquire a variance to erect a structure within the re- 
quired minimum front yard depth for property located on 
Industrial Way. 



Granted 



61 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decisio 



Case #11-76 

Al. & Catherine Carpentier 



To acquire a variance to subdivide a lot into two parcels, 
one having insufficient frontage for the purpose of acquir- 
ing all necessary permits to build a single family dwelling 
at 4 Judith Road, Wilmington. 



Case //12-76 
Stephen Gilardi 



To acquire a variance for a parcel of land having in- 
sufficient area and depth on Byron Street, Wilmington. 



Case #13-76 
Thomas W. Kelly 



To acquire a variance to build an addition to the existing 
dwelling with the required reserve side yard at 34 Brent- 
wood Avenue, Wilmington. 



Case #14-76 

Sweetheart Plastics, Inc. 
Jack Cushing, Agent 



To acquire a variance from the maximum height allowable in 
Table V-1 Proposed structure not to exceed height of ex- 
isting structures at One Burlington Avenue. 



Case #15-76 
Mary A. Messina 



To acquire a variance for permission to establish an "In- 
law Apartment" on 9 Elwood Road 



Case #16-76 

Leo & Kathleen Barry 



To acquire a variance to erect an addition within the re 
quired reserve front yard at 8 Chandler Road. 



Case #17-76 
Wilfred & Josephine 
Parker 



To acquire a variance to build an addition within a reserve 
side yard at property located at 15 Congress Street. 



Case #18-76 

James J. Gilligan 

Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 



To acquire a variance for a parcel of land having insuf- 
ficient depth on Federal Street (lot 5) . 



Grante 



Case #19-76 

John J . MacGilvray 

Daniel MacGilvray 

Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 



To acquire a variance for a parcel of land having insuf- 
ficient frontage on property located on Butters Row. 



Denied 



Case #20-76 
Leo & Mary A. 
Desharnais 



To acquire a variance to install a swimming pool within the 
required reserve side yard area at 23 Moore Street. 



Grante 



Case #21-76 
Chester H. Hall 



To acquire a variance to construct a home on a non-conforming 
lot having insufficient frontage, area, and depth. 



Denied 



Case #22-76 
Graham Builders 
Robt. Ramsdell, Owner 
D. Simmonds, Tenant 



To acquire a variance to erect a sign exceeding one square 
foot for every one hundred feet of ground floor area at 
474 Main Street. 



Grante 



Case #23-76 

Cressey Dockham & Co. 

Robt. Smith, Agent 



To acquire a variance to erect a sign within a required 
reserve front yard area on Ballardvale Street. 



Grante 



Case #24-76 
Altron, Inc. 



To acquire a variance to erect a sign within a required 
reserve front yard at One Jewel Drive. 



Grante 



62 



)plicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



tse #25-76 

larles Choate Memorial 
)spital 



To acquire a variance in accordance with Section III-l 
-B-2 to allow as a use "Ambulatory Care Center and Re- 
lated Medical Services", approximate location of Routes 
62 and 93. 



Granted 



ise #26-76 

)hn T. Spinelli 

larles Williams, Agent 



To acquire a variance to erect a sign within a required 
reserve front yard at 6 Jonspin Road. 



Granted 



ise #27-76 
Lchael Parziale 
Terranova, Attorney 



To acquire a variance to construct a Commercial Building 
within a required side yard on a lot having insufficient 
frontage on Main Street. 



Denied 



ise #28-76 

ithony J. Barletta 



To acquire a variance to construct a garage within a 
required side yard at 14 Ring Avenue. 



Granted 



ise #29-76 

Llliam & Madeline Sousa 



To acquire a variance to construct a garage within a 
required reserve side yard at 44 North Street. 



Granted 



ise #30-76 

ickson Brothers, Inc. 



To acquire a variance to erect a sign within a required 
reserve front yard at 200 Andover Street. 



Granted 



ise #31-76 

lomas E. Broderick 



To acquire a variance to install a swimming pool within 
a required reserve side yard at 11 Ella Avenue. 



Granted 



! ise #32-76 
toria Raynor 



To acquire a variance to erect additional sign area in 
excess of local zoning requirements at 418 Main Street. 



Denied 



i tse #33-76 

illey Properties, Inc, 



To acquire a variance to erect additional sign area in 
excess of local zoning requirements at 240 Main Street. 



Granted 



ise #34-76 

)hn J. Elia, Trust 

)hn J. Elia, Agent 



To acquire a variance from the local zoning requirements 
to erect a building having insufficient parking area at 
382 Middlesex Avenue. 



Denied 



Lse #35-76 

nneth & Marjorie 

itheson 



To acquire a variance to erect a garage within a required 
reserve side yard at 119 Aldrich Road. 



Granted 



ise #36-76 
lliam C. Birch 



To acquire a variance to erect a sign in excess of the 
allowable area at 240 Main Street. 



Granted 



ise #37-76 
uno Vitali 



To acquire a variance to erect a sign within the required 
reserve front yard at 874 Main Street. 



Denied 



i se #38-76 
chael Desmond 



To acquire a variance to install a swimming pool within 
the required reserve side yard area at 17 Forest Street. 



Granted 



63 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case //39-76 

Jackson Brothers, Inc. 



To acquire a variance to erect a structure within the 
minimum set back from the center line of street at 
200 Andover Street. 



Granted 



Case #40-76 
Paul Bongiorno 



To acquire a variance to construct a single family dwelling 
on a lot at 44 Park Street having insufficient frontage. 



Granted 



Case //41-76 
Gertrude McCarron 
Joseph F. Courtney, 
Attorney 



To acquire a variance to subdivide a parcel of land con- 
sisting of 2 acres into two parcels both having insuffi- 
cient frontage for the purpose of acquiring building 
permits for two single family dwellings at 270 Middlesex 
Avenue . 



Granted 



Case #42-76 
Joanne L. Vilasi 



To acquire a variance to erect a sign within a required 
reserve front yard at 37 Lowell Street. 



Granted 



Case #43-76 

Raymond & Jane Forest 



To acquire a variance for permission to establish an "In- 
Law Apartment at 27 Moore Street. 



Granted 



Case #44-76 
Clayton J. Hopel 



To obtain a variance to erect a swimming pool with the 
required reserve area at 1 Christine Drive. 



Granted 



Case #45-76 
Salvatore Depasquale 



To acquire a variance to enlarge a building exceeding 
50% of existing combined floor area on a non-conforming 
lot on Hardin Street. 



Denied 



Case #46-76 

Sweetheart Plastics, Inc. 



To obtain a variance on the height of one silo to the 
height of one foot less than existing silos at One 
Burlington Avenue. 



Granted 



Case #47-76 

Dennis M. Surprenant 



To obtain a variance to erect a carport within the required 
reserve side yard at 281 Shawsheen Avenue. 



Granted 



Case #48-76 

Jackson Brothers, Inc. 



To obtain a variance to operate a Body Shop in an Industri- 
al zoned area at 200 Andover Street. 



Granted 



Case #49-76 
Anthony & Grace 
Krzeminski 



To obtain a variance to erect a swimming pool with the 
required reserve side yard at 28 Moore Street. 



Granted 



Case #50-76 

Ralph A. D'Ambrosio 



To acquire a variance to subdivide a lot into two non- 
conforming lots at 125 Aldrich Road. 



Denied 



Case #51-76 

Jackson Brothers, Inc. 

Joseph F. Courtney, 

Attorney 

Case #52-76 
Leo Walsh 



To acquire a variance from Section V-5 of the zoning by- 
laws for nine (9) lots having sufficient frontage and 
area and located on Chestnut Street. 



To acquire a variance to erect an above-ground pool with- 
in the required reserve side yard at 2 Baker Street. 



Granted 



Granted 



64 



Applicant 

:ase //53-76 

>laria & James Assette 



]ase #54-76 
Raymond G. Forest 



]ase #55-76 

Barbara & Gerald White 



]ase #56-76 

ileen J. Shepardson 



Reason for Appeal 



To acquire a variance to erect an addition within a re- 
quired reserve side yard at 6 Walker Street. 



To acquire a variance to erect an addition within the 
required reserve side yard at 27 Moore Street. 



To acquire a variance to locate a dwelling within the 
required reserve yard areas at 17 Chestnut Street. 



To acquire a variance to subdivide a parcel of land into 
two non-conforming lots, both having insufficient front- 
age located at 400 Woburn Street. 



Decision 



Granted 



Granted 



Denied 



Granted 



:ase #57-76 
lames J. Rooney 
Joseph F. Courtney, 
Attorney 

:ase #58-76 
lobert Anderton 



:ase #59-76 

Jorbert K. & Sylvia S. Mader 



To acquire a variance to allow issuance of a building 
permit on a lot having insufficient depth at Oxford 
Road. 



To acquire a variance to install a swimming pool within 
a required reserve side yard at 36 Hathaway Road. 



To acquire a variance to install a swimming pool within 
a required reserve side yard at 6 Drury Lane. 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



:ase #60-76 

Centennial Properties, Inc. 



To obtain a special permit or variance for a woodworking 
and laminated plastic plant pursuant to Section III-4 
(B) (5) of the zoning by-laws which would be located at 
353 Middlesex Avenue. 



Withdrawn 



:ase #61-76 

Robert Fitzgibbon, Jr. 



:ase #62-76 

Centennial Properties, Inc. 
foseph F. Coutney, Attorney 



To acquire a variance to erect a shed within the re- 
quired reserve front yard at 1 Houghton Road. 



To acquire a special permit pursuant to Section III-4 
(B) (b) (5) of the zoning by-law authorizing a wood- 
working and plastic laminating plant at the premises 
located at 353 Middlesex Avenue. 



Granted 



Granted 



:ase #63-76 
lames J . Rooney 



To acquire a variance to allow issuance of a building 
permit on a lot having insufficient depth at property 
located on Oxford Road. 



Withdrawn 



:ase #64-76 

■ecrge W. Boylen 

larion C. Boylen 

ichard C. Swadel 

oseph Courtney, Attorney 

_ase #65-76 

oseph D. lannacchino 



To acquire a variance from the provisions of Section V 
of the Zoning By-law to allow the issuance of a building 
permit for a single family house on a lot having insuffi- 
cient area, said premises adjoining 22 Williams Avenue. 



To acquire a variance to erect a structure within a re- 
quired reserve front yard at 14 Dadant Drive. 



Granted 



Granted 



65 




Applicant 
Case #66-76 

Maureen & Joseph Florenza 



Reason for Appeal 



To obtain a variance to install a pool within a six- 
foot rear and six-foot side required reserve side yard 
area at 33 Everett Avenue. 



Decisioi 



Granted 



Case y/67-76 
Charles W. Doucette 
Ruth T. Doucette 



Case #68-76 

Anello L. Minervini, Jr. 



Case #69-76 
Wayne Lanzillo 



To acquire a variance to locate an existing building 
within the required reserve side and rear yard and erect 
a new building within a required reserve side yard at prop- 
erty located at 609 and 611 Main Street. 

To acquire a variance to erect a breezeway and garage within 
a required reserve front yard at 4 Melody Lane. 



To acquire a variance to erect a structure within a re- 
quired reserve side yard at 32 Fairmeadow Road. 



Granted 



Granted 



Case #70-76 

Nikemi Investment Company 
Bruno Vitali, Agent 

Case #71-76 

John J. MacGilvray 

Daniel MacGilvray 

Joseph Courtney, Attorney 

Case #72-76 

Carol & Alan Vecchio 



To erect a sign within a required reserve front yard area 
on 874 Main Street. 



To acquire a variance to build a single family dwelling 
on a parcel of land having insufficient frontage on 
Butters Row. 



To acquire a variance to subdivide a parcel of land into 
three lots having sufficient frontage and area but lack- 
ing the right angle depth requirements at 63 Aldrich Rd. 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Case #73-76 

Sally & Joseph Brennan 



To acquire a variance from Section V-5 (lot depth) in 
order to subdivide a parcel of land having 3.29 acres 
into two lots on Mill Road. 



Granted 



Case #74-76 

Henry Chasen 

Malcolm Houck, Attorney 

Case #75-76 

John Bishop 

William Traer, Owner 

Joseph Courtney, Attorney 



To acquire a variance to merchandise fresh seafood, pre- 
pared and/or cooked seafood for take-out at 510 Main St. 



To acquire a variance from the provisions of Section III- 
1 of the zoning by-law to allow, authorize, and confirm 
the conducting of the present non- con forming use of Radio 
Tower, Inc., on the premises at 611 Woburn Street. 



Denied 



Denied 



Case #76-76 
Salvatore DePasquale 



To acquire a variance to permit an existing building to 
remain located within a front yard and side yard reserve 
area and enlarge same at Hubbard and Harden Streets. 



Granted 



Case #77-76 

Josephine & Domenic V. 

Tutela 



To acquire a variance to build a garage within the re- 
quired reserve front and side yard area at 18 School St. 



Granted 



Case #78-76 

Larz Neilson Trust 

Larz Neilson, Agent 



To acquire a variance to enlarge an existing building 
within a required reserve side yard at 364 Middlesex 
Avenue . 



Granted 



66 



ipllcant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



se #79-76 

rbara & William Frey 



se #80-76 

inelli Godfrey Realty Tr. 
seph Courtney, Attorney 



To acquire a variance for permission to establish an 
"In-Law Apartment" at 46 Middlesex Avenue. 



To acquire a variance and/or a special permit to allow 
for the retail sale of hot and/or cold sandwiches at 
316 Main Street. 



Granted 



Denied 



se #81-76 

rbara R. & Gerald White 
seph Courtney, Attorney 



To obtain a variance or special permit to reconstruct on 
a non-conforming lot with insufficient area and depth, a 
house destroyed by fire with altered and enlarged di- 
mensions sited on a different locus within the lot, and 
within required reserved yard areas at 17 Chestnut St. 



Granted 



se #82-76 

is B. & Stanley Hinxman 
Iter Hinxman, Agent 



To acquire a variance to subdivide a parcel of land into 
two lots, one conforming and one having insufficient 
depth measured at right angles at 150 Chestnut Street. 



Granted 



■se #83-76 

iter G. Anderson 



i 

:se #84-76 
lymond Piretti 



ise #85-76 

xistine & Tex D. Hancock 



To acquire a variance from Section V-5 of the zoning 
by-laws (lot depth) and Section V-1 (Schedule of Require- 
ments) reserve front yard at 10 Shawsheen Avenue. 



To acquire a variance to construct an "In-Law Apartment' 
within a required side yard at 20 Dadant Drive. 



To acquire a variance of special permit to allow for 
the open storage of contractors' equipment at 8 
Dunton Road . 



Denied 



Granted 



Withdrawn 



se #86-76 

nrad J. Gerhartz 



To acquire a variance to erect an addition within a re- 
quired reserve front yard area at 45 Andover Street. 



Granted 



se #87-76 

bbs Realty & Investment 
seph Courtney, Attorney 



To appeal the determination of the Building Inspector 
denying a building permit, and alternatively to obtain 
authorization for a building permit for a non-conforming 
use at 342 Main Street. 



Denied 



se #88-76 

amond Crystal Salt Co. 
seph Courtney, Attorney 



se #89-76 



ilrley Burns 



se #90-76 



seph J. O'Donnell 



To obtain a variance for house lot with less than re- 
quired frontage, area, and depth, with existing house 
not conforming to required front and side yard require- 
ments, and to obtain a variance for accessory industrial 
use to authorize existing on site leaching field located 
on residentially zoned land at 4 Floradale Avenue. 



To acquire a variance to erect a storage shed within a 
required reserve side yard at 205 Middlesex Avenue 

To acquire a variance to build on a lot having insuffi- 
cient frontage located on Aldrich Road. 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



67 



I 

I 

1 



School Committee 



The School Coiranittee of the Town of Wilmington herewith presents its report for the year 1976. The present 
membership of the Coiranittee is as follows: 

John D. Brooks, Chairperson 

Linda T. McMenimen, Vice Chairperson 

Francis A. Ottati, Secretary 

James A. Demos 

David J. Dingle 

Lester E. White 

Wilmington opened its school doors this year on September 8, 1976, with a total enrollment of 5052 students. | 
This figure is down 232 from last year's official enrollment of 5284. 

HIGH SCHOOL RENOVATION f> 

Due to the uncertainty associated with the State's commitment to funding the office of School Building Assisj* 
ance and the general financial condition of the Commonwealth as reflected in its declining reimbursement foii, 
school construction projects, the School Committee decided to embark on an internal renovation and conversic|| 
project at Wilmington High School during 1976. The purpose of the program is to update obsolete and archaicll 
instructional facilities and equipment, as well as to provide additional instructional space through convert! 
ing some non-instructional areas into instructional sites. The program is designed to be done in three (3) 
phases over a period of three (3) years. The total cost of the renovation is estimated to be approximately i 
$225,000 with each one-year phase expending about $75,000. i 



Phase I was initiated and nearly completed in 1976. At this writing, only the arrival of some classroom anc 
cafeteria furniture and some equipment installation in the science area are remaining. Total completion is 
anticipated in a few days. 

The School Committee earmarked $75,000 from the 1976-77 school budget to finance the Phase I activities. 
These included : 

a. A major renovation to the Industrial Arts area with a special commitment to the updating of 
our Graphic Arts equipment. 

b. Major renovation and acoustical work in the music room, including carpeting. 

c. Replacement and restoration of our science laboratory equipment, furnishings, and storage. 

d. The development and furnishing of a resource room. 

e. Furnishing, acoustical work and carpeting in the library, resource room, and the reading clinic. 

f. Replacement of some cafeteria furniture. 

g. Some security work in the guidance area. 

h. Replacement of several rooms of classroom furniture. 



i 



The above activities were considered as the major priorities of the School Administration and the School 



68 



lominittee to be completed in the first year. It was felt that these improvements would have the greatest im- 
pact on the continuation of our accreditation which has suffered under a tenuous status during recent years. 

In December 15, 1976, the School Committee voted to set aside $65,325 from available P.L.874 funds to immedi- 
itely begin Phase II. Priorities for Phase II include the creation of an additional teaching station for 
ihysical education, new classroom furniture in several curriculum areas, shelving and storage facilities in 
teveral areas, major equipment replacement in our new Occupational and Career Education Department, and addi- 
lional specialized science equipment for our laboratories. 

'he Committee also expects that other appropriate municipal budgets will contain items which will benefit our 
ichools as part of a total capital improvement program. 

ACCREDITATION 

;he school department has recently received word from the New England Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Ichools that Wilmington High School has had its accreditation continued through June, 1977. The progress 
lade during the aforementioned Phase I is undoubtedly a contributing factor in this continuance. 

KINDERGARTEN 

September of 1976 saw our kindergarten classes housed in our regular public school buildings for the first 
;ime since the beginning of the program in 1973. Prior to this year the kindergarten classes had been con- 
lucted in local church facilities. The School Committee is grateful to the participating churches for their 
)ast support. It had always been the plan, however, since the inception of the program, to house the kinder- 
;artens in our existing elementary schools as soon as space became available to do so. This year six (6) 
kindergarten classes are being conducted in the following schools; one in Buzzell, three in Shawsheen, one in 
fildwood, and one in Woburn Street. This reduction to six classes from our original structure of eight class- 
rooms is further evidence of our declining enrollment. 

STAFF RECRUITMENT 

is in the three previous years, the number of qualified teachers applying for jobs greatly exceeded the 
-imited number of positions available. The school administration received over 1000 inquiries and applications 
:rom certified teaching personnel. A significant number of these inquiries were received from out of state 
raiversities. 

it the administrative-supervisory level the Committee created three (3) new positions and eliminated or con- 
iolidated six (6) others. 

m additional assistant principalship was established at Wilmington High School, and Mr. John B. Lynch was 
ilected to fill that post effective in September of the current school year. His previous part-time position 
IS Coordinator of Student Activities was eliminated as was the extra contracted service requirement necessary 
:o annually schedule the High School by computer. Both of these requirements were incorporated into the 
regular job assignment for the new Assistant Principal. 

'he Committee created the position of Director of Data Processing Services upon the recommendation of the 
)ata Processing Feasibility Study Committee. These recommendations were presented to the School Committee on 
Jovember 10, 1975 and they were printed in the 1975 Annual Town Report . Following an extensive search, Mr. 
idward L. Sousa was appointed to the systemwide position in July of 1976. 

.Vo vacant supervisory positions led the Committee to a reorganization of three departments in October of 
.976. The position of Director of Occupational and Career Education was created to fill an important educa- 
rional void for our young people while, at the same time, consolidating the efforts of three existing de- 
)artments which have similar purposes. The positions of Department Chairperson in Business Education, Home 
Iconomics, and in Industrial Arts were eliminated and the supervision of these three areas was assigned to 
:he new Director of Occupational and Car eer Education. Mr. Alfred G. Hambelton was appointed to fill this 
"osition early in the school year. 

Vo other administration positions were eliminated during 1976. The position of Administrator of Work Study 
ras removed and his duties turned over to the High School Administration when the present Business Manager 
issumed his new post. In the Central Office the position of Administrator of Non-Instructional Personnel and 
delated Services was eliminated. 



69 



Requests for leaves of absence, resignations, and retirements were granted to thirty-five (35) teachers for 
the following reasons: 



Leaves of Absence: 



Resignations : 



Sabbatical Leave (Semester) 
Maternity Leave 
Graduate Study 
Temporary Relocation 



1 
8 
1 
1 



Retirement 

Teach in Other Communities 
Continue Education 
Family Responsibility 
Career Change 
Reduction in Force 
Counselled Out 



4 
A 
3 
8 
2 
1 
3 



Retirements : 



The School Committee wishes to recognize the retirement of Mr. Bernard P. McMahon who served our community 
with distinction as a teacher and administrator for 32 years. Mr. McMahon was appointed Principal of 
Wilmington High School in September 27, 1951, and served in that capacity until 1974 when he assumed a posit 
in the central administration. A distinguished educator, Mr. McMahon was known throughout the State for his 
work in secondary education. He was active in the profession as a member of the Massachusetts Association o 
Secondary School Principals and served as President of that Association during the 1972 school year. 

Mr. McMahon 's tenure in Wilmington covered a period of unprecedented growth in the High School enrollment ani 
in expansion of the present facilities. His leadership during this period earned him the respect of the Com- 
mittee, Administration, teachers, parents and students. His efforts on behalf of us all are gratefully ac- 
knowledged by this Committee. 

The Committee also wishes to acknowledge the retirement of Mrs. Mary F. Brady who served our community for 6 
years as an elementary classroom teacher. Mrs. Brady's warm compassionate nature and dedication to quality 
education for her students is greatly appreciated by all who worked with her. She will be sorely missed by 
the Committee, her fellow professionals, and by her grateful students. 

During 1976 Mr. Frederick G. Stewart retired from active service as a regular member of our elementary Art 
Department. Mr. Stewart served as art teacher in Wilmington for the last nine years. Throughout a career 
that spanned both industry and education, Mr. Stewart brought creativity and an enthusiasm for the arts to hi 
profession which had a significant effect on the positive growth of his students. The Committee is grateful 
to Mr. Stewart for his excellent contributions to our young people. 

On December 31, 1976 Mrs. Ruth Prolman retired after twenty years of service to the Town of Wilmington. Mrs. 
Prolman served as a grade 1 teacher during these years and earned the respect of students, parents and fellov 
teachers as an excellent grade 1 teacher. The Committee wishes to take this opportunity to extend its sincei 
appreciation to Mrs. Prolman for her dedicated service to the youth of Wilmington. 

The School Committee extends its appreciation to these four fine people for their faithful service and wishes 
all of them a happy and healthy retirement. 

The Wilmington Public Schools were in operation 180 days beginning September 3, 1975 and ending June 22, 1976 
The Committee held twenty-three (23) regular meetings, nine (9) special meetings, sixteen (16) meetings rel- 
ative to collectiving bargaining, one (1) public budget meeting for a total of forty-nine (49) meetings for 
the year 1976. 

The Committee is grateful to the Town Officials, other Town Departments, and to the citizens of Wilmington 
for their excellent cooperation and assistance during the past year. 



70 



Superintendent of Schools 



am pleased to submit the Annual Report of the activities of the Wilmington Public Schools of the year 1976. 

le moratorium that was placed on all suggested school construction continued throughout 1976 and will be ex- 
;nded indefinitely. Changes in population statistics in Wilmington and in the nation bear close scrutiny in 
le years to come. Should current trends continue it would precipitate the closing of some schools at the 
.ementary level and even a possible realignment of the three existing secondary schools. To be sure, there 
•e many variables that bear watching. During the month of January, 1977 the Wilmington Public Schools will 
mduct a joint census with the Town Board of Registrars. These findings which will be available approxi- 
itely in April, 1977 will provide the main input for the projected enrollments through 1982. 

iroughout this report, I will highlight those changes that have addressed themselves toward improvement in 
le existing school programs. 

WILMINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Work-Study Program - This year our work study program has been under the direction of Assistant Principal 
Harold F. Garrett, as the position of Work Study Coordinator was eliminated by the School Committee. Our 
work study program seeks to encourage over one hundred students to stay in school by providing them with 
supervised opportunities to work and by keeping in close contact with their homes and teachers. 

Alternative Education - Recognizing the need for some students to participate in a program different from 
I what we are currently offering in our school, a group of teachers have held a series of meetings in the 
late afternoon discussing how we might provide more meaningful programs for those students who are failing 
and/or have poor self-images. The fruition of the efforts of these staff members hopefully will be a pro- 
gram that will better educate these students. 

School Attendance - It is our belief that school learning goes on primarily in classrooms. In order for 
students to profit from this they must be in school and in their classes; therefore, improved school at- 
tendance continues to be a major thrust of the high school administration. To accomplish our goal of 95% 
attendance we call daily the homes of students who are absent and those who are tardy to school. In addi- 
tion, those students who reportedly miss a class have their homes called too. As a result of our efforts 
our school attendance has been nearly 95%. 

Safety - The continued safety of the students and staff is a daily concern. As recommended by the Fire 
Department, the front driveway of the high school has been expanded to permit a clearly defined Fire Lane 
which has been marked off by the Building and Grounds Department. In addition, following the recommenda- 
tion of Safety Officer John Ritchie, No Parking signs have been posted on Adams Street to prevent accidents 
I due to darting out between parked cars. 

Advanced Placement - Our concern for providing challenges for those students who are academically talented 
is ongoing. To further challenge our academically-talented students, two advanced placement program cours- 
es have been developed. Upon a student's successful completion of one of these courses and the passing of 
an examination, college credit may be granted. In addition, two students graduated from their Junior year 
in high school due to an accelerated program, and one student completed her senior year of high school at 
a college. 

Foreign Language Department - On May 19th we inducted our top twenty-six Spanish students into the 
"Sociedad Honoraria Hispanica" and our top nineteen French students into the "Societe Honoraire de Francais" 
at a night induction of both organizations. Eligibility for these honors is based on both performance and 
interest in foreign languages. Both organizations are affiliated with national organizations — the American 



71 



Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portugese. 



The second annual total immersion program in French was held in June at Gordon College. Students from 
Andover, North Andover , Methuen, North Reading, Lynnfield, and Wilmington participated in the two day r€ 
treat. Highlights of the program which was designed to keep students totally involved in French include 
lectures on Canada and French poetry, folk dancing, a song fest, games, and a feature french film. 

More than eighty students were enrolled in Spanish III during the 1975-1976 school year. Only thirteen 
students had reached this level during the previous year. About half of the eighty students were soph- 
omores who are the pioneers of the totally elective Junior High Foreign Language program. These student 
will be able to take Spanish IV in their Junior year and Spanish V in their senior year. 

G. American History Advanced Placement Program - The new American History Advanced Placement Program is a 
formal college-level course emphasizing analytical skills necessary for successful completion of the 
National examination given in the spring by the College Entrance Examination Board. Students who score 
well on the examination will be eligible for advanced placement in history at many colleges and universi 
ties. The Advanced Placement course stresses political history, foreign affairs, economic and social 
development, and literary, cultural, and religious history. 

Students are required to work at extensive, independent research outside the classroom for book reports, 
oral presentations, and research papers. Supplementary readings beyond the textbook, in the form of doc ■ 
ments, essays or books on special themes are required for the student to extend himself in the field of 
American History. Videotape equipment is being used during classroom debates to study language skills. 
Students learn how to take notes from printed materials and lectures in order to write critical and anal ;- 
ical responses to essay examinations. 

H. Computer Programming - The Director of Data Processing teaches two classes at the high school in Compute, 
Programming. In order to teach the course we have made special arrangements with Shawsheen Valley Tech-^ 
nical High School to have four terminals installed at the high school. From the Initial enrollment and . 
enthusiasm the students are exhibiting, we expect even more students to be involved in this dynamic , 
program. 

ART 

Our Intermediate and High School Art students distinguished themselves competitively in a way that we believ 
speaks well for the quality of instruction and encouragement provided in our Art Program. 

Six students received Scholastic Art Awards, indicating statewide recognition, during the Scholastic Art Exh 
bit in February, 2 of those were Gold Key Awards also denoting New England Regional Honor and Entry in Nati 
al Competition. Through the individualized instruction provided by staff memb ers , one student at the High 
School prepared a photography portfolio which then received National Honors. 

The High School Art program offered, for the first time, greater opportunities in course selection with chol 
of in-depth semester courses in: Design and Crafts, Humanities, Drawing and Painting, Ceramics, Printmaking 
Fibers, and Sculpture. Approval was granted to now offer Photography to students. Student response was so 
great that we provided Art courses for over 500 students a year compared to 300 the previous year. 

We were able to secure an additional yearly Art Scholarship for a graduating senior preparing for a career i 
an Art-related field. 

Wilmington's Intermediate and High School students participated in the Shawsheen Valley Regional Art Exhibit 
and received 75 awards; more than any of the other towns that competed. 

ENGLISH 

Teaching of Writing at Wilmington High School . The English program at the high school has been revised to 
give greater emphasis to writing instruction. Specific goals have been written for grades nine and ten whic 
involve the process, conventions, and techniques of writing. At least 50% of instructional time is devoted 
improving skill in writing. 

A departmental requirement and guidelines for writing have also been established for all electives in grades 
eleven and twelve. All students are required to take at least one course that focuses on writing instructio! 



72 



1 addition, all electives require weekly writing assignments and instruction in skills as needed. Finally, 
;udents in advanced literature courses are assigned a research paper project. 

;w Spelling Program . After two years of development, a new guide for spelling instruction has been completed 
)r the elementary teachers in the Wilmington schools. The program was started in September for grades 4-6, 
1 September 1977, it will be implemented in grades D-3. 

le spelling program involves a basic word list, plus specific teaching strategies such as the test-study-test 
jthod and proofreading for spelling in written work. A textbook is used as a supplemental aid for additional 
;tivities, homework assignments, and remedial instruction. Students are expected to maintain individual spell- 
ig notebooks and are tested every two weeks. 

le main goal of spelling instruction is to improve spelling ability in the written work that students complete 
ich week. Therefore, students are involved in frequent writing tasks and shown how to proofread their own 
)rk. It must be remembered that spelling is not an end in itself; it is a means for improving written 
jmmunication. 

mdwriting Instruction . All students in grades 1 and 3 are now using Scott, Foresman's new handwriting pro- 
ram Writing Our Language. The adoption of this program means that all students in these grades have consist- 
it and effective instruction in beginning manuscript and beginning cursive writing. 

committee of five elementary teachers and Mr. Romano, Director of English Language Arts, reviewed a wide 
inge of available programs before selecting the Scott, Foresman materials. In 1977-78 the materials will be 
Qplemented in grades 2 and A. 

FAMILY LIFE EDUCATION 

le Wilmington School Administration created a new committee (Concerned Citizens of Wilmington) to deal with 
le multifaceted problem of alcohol abuse. The educational leadership provided by the schools has motivated 
18 churches, law enforcement agencies, service organizations, industries, professional and business men to 
^operate with the schools to assess this problem. It is the consensus of the committee that the time is ripe 
jr attacking the alcohol problem with the same kind of teamwork and cooperative action which has been ef- 
2Ctive in dealing with other public health problems. The results so far have been encouraging. The goal of 
18 committee is to promote responsible decision making and attitude formation regarding the use of alcohol 
id thereby help to bring the abusive use of alcohol under better control. The committee has adopted a deep 
3cial and moral concern in order that Wilmington's image as a progressive and viable community for young 
;ople will be a reality. The Concerned Citizens Committee, comprised of a varied representation from business, 
18 professions, clergymen, law enforcement officials, educators and parents, wants to be a part of that reality. 

PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES 

tie Administrator of Pupil Personnel Services is responsible for the direction, control and coordination of 
Dunseling services, special education, health services, school-wide testing and the core evaluation team. 

salth Services . During the past year we conducted a "Health Fair" in conjunction with the Board of Health, 
le Regional Health Center , the Wilmington Chamber of Commerce and Kiwanis . 

1 addition to giving Mantoux tests, the school nurses volunteered their services to the community by giving 
<7ine flu inoculations to residents of Wilmington. They also conducted a swine flu clinic for the school staff; 
18-hundred eight (108) people took advantage of this opportunity. 

junseling . A "Career Night" was conducted with the cooperation of the Chamber of Commerce, the Kiwanis and 
3tary service clubs, and the support of many local business, labor and industry people. 

1 exciting innovation which will go into effect at the end of November is the CIS (Guidance Information 
I'stem) . This program includes complete information on the following categories: Four-year colleges, two- 
Jar colleges, scholarship and financial aid information, and occupational and career information. Wilmington 
3 particularly fortunate in that we will have four computer terminals available each of which will work at 
le rate of 30 characters per second in providing answers to requests for information. This is three times 
18 speed of the terminals available to the other school systems. Furthermore, because of our special phone 
crangements , it is estimated that we will be saving some $13,000 in telephone costs over the next five years. 

lis year we also initiated a 5-year and a 1-year follow up study of Wilmington High School graduates. 



73 



Between August, '75 and the present time, the work-study program placed 225 students in WSP jobs. The ever 
counseling program involved 82 different people (including 60 drop-outs) over 176 sessions. 



Special Education . The Special Education Department received a Title VI-B Grant for the 1976-1977 school y r 
This Grant allowed the Special Education Program to increase its Resource Room and Learning Disabilities St f 
at Wilmington High School. The Grant is significant in that it was the only proposal from the Northeast 
Region of the State to be funded at 100% of request. The additional staffing at the High School will insur 
smaller student/teacher ratios and will allow the Department to better serve special needs students at 
Wilmington High School. 

Along with the Title VI-B Grant, additionally the Resource Room Facility has been expanded and refurnished, 
providing a better atmosphere for tutorial, remedial, and support services. The new High School Resource R n 
allows for a consolidation of Resource Room, Learning Disabilities Teachers, and Speech Therapist to work t 
gether in a more coordinated approach to providing services for special needs students. 



This year the federal government has instituted a new Special Education Law, PL94-142. This law should pro 
vide additional federal funding for cities and towns to improve and expand Special Education Services. Eac 
community receives an entitlement based on the number of identified special needs students in the community 
Each community must write a proposal to obtain their federal funds. The Wilmington entitlement is approxi- 
mately $30,000.00, and a federal project has been written to bring the services of additional speech therap 't 
to our school system. The total of the proposal is in excess of $30,000.00. We are optimistic with respec 
to the funding of this project. 



The Special Education Department streamlined pre-school screening procedures which were successful in scree 
ing several hundred children on two weekends this past spring. They also prepared and mailed over 5,000 
notices to Wilmington residents in this regard. 

READING 



D. 



A. Two courses have been added to the high school reading program. They are Study Skills Elective and 
College Board Review . Courses are offered for credit on a semester basis. Students may also sign up f ; 
courses on a short-term basis for no credit. 

B. The Volunteer Reading Tutor Program in which members of the community, after twenty hours of training 
from the Reading Department, are placed in schools as reading tutors for children in grades one through 
three has started its fourth year of operation. Mrs. Irene Beaton is the community coordinator for 
1976-1977. 

C. Elementary School Teachers are participating in an on-site in-service education program in which readin; 
specialists team with teachers in the classroom in order to share their reading skills and help teacher; 
to individualize reading instruction. As a result of the addition of two staff members to the Reading 
Department, elementary reading specialists are in each classroom an average of one and one-half hours p> 
week. 



According to recent federal regulations, in addition to a systemwide Title I Parents Advisory Council, 
Title I PACs have been established at each Title I School. The Title I Chairpersons are as follows: 



Mrs. Lurlyne MacLellan 

Mrs. Evelyn Surrette 

Mrs. Joyce Duffy 

Mrs. Geraldine Pisapia 

Mrs. Donna Butt 

Mrs. Irene Tarara 



Shawsheen School 
Shawsheen School 
Boutwell School 
Glen Road School 
Wildwood School 
Wildwood School 



SCIENCE 



The Science Department at the High School has a new Chemistry Laboratory. Room 224 has been completely out- 
fitted with new Chemistry Laboratory Islands and when completed will give us two full functioning Chemistry 
Laboratories. The Biology Laboratories have been reoutfitted by reinstalling some laboratory Service Islanc 
complete with water, gas and electricity. 

This year the Science Program at the High School level has instituted new courses in "Action Biology" and 
"Action Chemistry" for the non-college bound student. These courses provide the student with a hands on appii 



74 



) Science. 



The content of these courses is most relevant to their career goals. 



18 Clinical Practice and Medical Microbiology courses continue to receive acclaim by hospital laboratory 
[rectors including those from Massachusetts General, Boston's Children's Hospital, Deaconness, and Winchester 
)spitals. A new instructional approach for the Chemistry and Biology programs is being developed. This ap- 
roach will incorporate individualized instruction with students learning at their own rate. Implementation 
ite will be September, 1977. 

; have written a "Metric System" Curriculum and are providing the teaching staff with in-service programs in 
;trics. Plans have also been made to provide the citizens of the community with the opportunity to take 
'ening Metric System Awareness programs. 

le "Chemistry Magic Show" continues to be most popular. This year several surrounding communities, Dracut, 
iwksbury, and Andover have read about the "Show" in the newspapers and have requested that the "Show"come to 
leir communities. This December the "Magic Show" will travel to the South School in Andover, Massachusetts. 



am pleased to report that through the efforts of the townspeople of Wilmington over fifteen thousand dollars 
: local monies was awarded to our graduation class. In addition, as reported by students to us, over sixty- 
lur thousand dollars was received by Wilmington High School students in college scholarships. The above 
.gures do not include the value of two full tuition and board scholarships valued at close to one hundred 
lousand dollars received by two members of the Class of 1976. 




SCHOLARSHIPS 



CLASS OF 1976 



ircent to four year colleges and universities 

ircent to two year colleges 

!rcent to nursing schools 

ircent to other post-high school education 

ircent to further education 

'.rcent to working forces 

ircent to military service 

ircent to marriage 

ircent that failed to respond to survey 



27.7 
10.2 
1.3 
3.1 
42.3 
40.5 
4.2 
1.0 
12.0 



100.0% 



,sted below are the colleges, universities, technical schools, and nursing schools to which our 1976 
aduates have indicated their intention to attend in the fall: 



lur Year Colleges and Universities : 



lantic Union College 
:ntley College 
irkeley School of Music 
iston College 
ntral Bible College 
j'lby College 
Tnell University 
lerson College 
llsley College 

ssachusetts College of Art 

rrimack College 
l|rtheastern University 
[rtheastern School of the Bible 
ijinnipiac College 
jgis College 
[imnons College 
Ijith College 

(utheastern Massachusetts University 



Springfield College 
State College at Bridgewater 
State College at Fitchburg 
State College at Framingham 
State College at North Adams 
State College at Salem 
State College at Westfield 
Suffolk University 
Syracuse University 
Tufts University 
U.S. Air Force Academy 
University of Lowell 
University of Mass @ Amherst 
University of Mass (? Boston 
University of Maine @ Orono 
University of New Hampshire 
Wellesley College 
Wentworth Institute 



75 




Less Than Four Year Colleges : 



Bay State Junior College 
Boston Arthitectural Center 
Boston University School of 

Graduate Dentistry 
Bridgton Academy 
Bunker Hill Community College 
Burdett School 
Canterbury School 
Chamberlayne Junior College 
Endicott Junior College 
Essex Agricultural and Technical 

Institute 
Graham Junior College 



Holliston Junior College 
Leicester Junior College 
Massachusetts Bay Community Colleg 
Middlesex Community 
Mount Ida Junior College 
New England School of Photography 
Northern Essex Community College 
North Shore Community College 
Northeast Institute of Technology 
Solari School of Hairdressing 
Tewksbury Hospital School of Pract 

Nursing 
Touch Shorthand Academy 



In conclusion, I would like to take this opportunity to extend my appreciation to the School Committe, 
Administrators, teachers, parents and students who contributed their efforts to the Wilmington Public Schoc 
during the 1976 school year. A special note of thanks also is extended to the many town departments that 
cooperated with the school system during 1976. 



TOWN OF WTLMINGTON 
DETAIL OF REVETJUE SHARING 
JULY 1, 1975 to JUNE 30, 1976 



Federal Grants 



Interest Reed, 
on Investments 



E:xp ended 



Balance on 
Hand 



Balajice on hand July 1, 19 75 



Received 7/1/75 through 6/30/76 $ij.88,l72.00 



10,631 .31 



595,503.83 



$ 38,957.65 Cash In Bank 

150,000.00 Invested 
$188,957.65 



$ 53, 882 .i;5 Cash in Bank 

38, 3714.. 68 Encumbered BC/i 
$ 9^^,^57.13 



E}g3enditures; 

Police Salaries 
Fire Salaries 
Town Duirip 

Blue Gross/Blue Shield 
and Group Life 



$285,31^7 .iil 
273,711 .10 

12,820.00 

23,625.32 
$595,503.83 



"I certify that this is a true extra 
of the Revenue Sharing Funds of the 
Town of Wilmington, Mass." 



Robert H. Peters 
Town Accountant 



76 




Shawsheen Tech. School Committee 



Regular meetings of the Regional School Committee were held the second and fourth Tuesday of each month. 
Numerous additional special meetings were called by the Chairman as the need arose during this extremely active 
year. The time and place of all meetings are duly posted by the District Town Clerks at least forty-eight hours 
in advance. Unless otherwise noted, the meetings are held at the school facility located at 100 Cook Street, 
Billerica. These meetings are open to the public and residents of the District are encouraged to attend. 

The elected representatives of the School Committee are: 

BEDFORD 

Anthony Mazzone 

Joseph Rogers, Vice Chairman 

BILLERICA 

Kenneth L. Buffum, Secretary-Treasurer 
Paul Heffernan 

BURLINGTON 

|A Wallace B. Haigh 

" John G. Murphy, Chairman 

TEWKSBURY 

Wilson E. Brazile 
Richard E. Griffin 

WILMINGTON 

Eugene L. Kritter 
Frank McLean 

The highlight of the year in my estimation as Chairman of the Shawsheen School Committee was the action by the 
District Town Meetings to reduce Shawsheen 's budget by seventeen per cent or $500,000. Members of the District's 
Finance Committees met with Shawsheen 's School Committee for many hours prior to the town meetings for budget 
review. Our Committee had, as in the past, made numerous cuts in the preliminary budget prior to its finali- 
zation and submittal to the towns. Unfortunately, the emotional debates which took place on the town meeting 
floors ended with a budget cut vote. 

The need for effective occupational preparation of our youth has been clearly defined. Each year Shawsheen 
Tech has had to turn away hundreds of students who were desirous of receiving an education which would prepare 
them for profitable employment upon graduation. We have doubled the size of the school since our opening in 
1970 and still the applications for enrollment are more than we can admit. We have provided occupational ed- 
ucation for more students by initiating the occupational skills afternoon program. Our summer and adult school 
programs are over subscribed. The Area Coordinator program provides stimulation and funding for satellite 
courses in occupational education conducted in the district's high schools. Society demands a resource of 
skilled tradesmen and women and we have a responsibility to attempt to satisfy that demand. 

As more and more students enroll at Shawsheen Tech, including summer school programs, the financial responsi- 
bility of the region's school systems declines. Shawsheen Tech is fully equipped with teachers and machinery 



77 



to provide the best occupational education the students of the district can receive at reasonable cost. Oul 
per pupil cost to the taxpayers of the district is considerably lower than the per pupil cost of the Distri 
high schools. 

All I have said leads one to believe that Shawsheen Tech is a bargain. Well I can honestly say after nine 
years on the school board that the statement is true. 

When the Shawsheen Tech School Board submits a budget, that budget was arrived at after numerous hours of 
regular and subcommittee review meetings. 

The members of the Board are actually elected agents of the people who represent all of the people all of t 
time. We will continue to operate this facility with an "open book" policy in all our financial matters. 
It would be irresponsible on our part to turn the responsibility of Shawsheen Tech's operation over to any 
other appointed or elected town or state person or group. 




Harnden Tavern - Open House 



78 



Shawsheen Tech. Superintendent 




The year 1976 was the first school year that our new addition was put into operation. The increase of twelve 
new programs will make it possible to bring the total student enrollment to a maximum of 1,600 which will be 
reached in approximately two years. The importance of vocational education has been recognized by the resi- 
dents of the five towns and has been reflected in the enrollment applications which this September totaled 
close to 800, although there was only space for 380 new ninth graders this year. 

We are aware that one of the frequent criticisms of public schools is the failure to fully utilize school 
facilities. Our school has made every effort to make use of the facilities as much as possible. We have done 
this by the following: 

a. The addition of the Occupational Skill Program which permits 314 additional students to take their 
academic subjects in the local school and come to Shawsheen to participate in a shop program from 
2:30—5 P.M. each day. 

b. Adult Education Program involving some 1,400 persons. These programs operate Monday through Thursday 
evenings from 7 — 10 P.M. 

c. The Extended School Year in the form of a summer program making it possible for some 860 students to 
acquire skill training and use the school facilities for a six week period during July and August. 

d. Senior Skill Program whereby arrangements have been made for some twenty-three seniors in the local 

I school who are not going on to college, to take full shop programs and acquire a saleable skill. It 

is found that this program has increased in popularity and preliminary registration indicates that 
next spring the number of students in this program will double. 

e. Career Awareness Program is a special program that has been worked out with the guidance counselors 
of the five towns to help students who are potential dropouts or over age to gain some experience in 
shop work at Shawsheen Tech with the possibility that they can be absorbed into the afternoon program. 

The Administration and the School Committee are constantly on the alert for any other training programs in 
order to make available vocational education to the residents of the five towns. 



Although we are primarily known for our vocational programs, we feel it should be understood that we do have a 
full academic curriculum. By state law, 50% of the school time is devoted to skill training and the other 50% 



VOCATIONAL COURSES AVAILABLE: 




Auto Body 

Automotive Mechanics 
Business Technology 
Carpentry 

Chem Lab Technology 

Commercial Art & Technical Illustrating 

Cosmetology 

Culinary Arts 

Data Processing 

Diesel & Heavy Equipment 

Electrical 

Electro-Mechanical Technology 



Electronics 
Graphic Arts 
Health Occupations 

Heating, Air Conditioning & Refrigeration 

Machine Shop 

Masonry 

Metal Fabrication & Welding 

Photography 

Plant Maintenance 

Plumbing & Pipe Fitting 

Recreational Vehicles (small engines) 

Technical Drafting 



79 




to academic and shop related subjects. The present operation gives students a full week of shop followed by 
full week of academic subjects. The school day consists of eight periods which are all assigned leaving no 
study periods per week. The material covered includes English, Social Studies, General Science, Physical 
Science, Physics, General Math, Algebra, Geometry, Business Math, U.S. History, Health & Physical Education. 
Music Appreciation, Related Technology. In the senior year the following electives are made available: Bio >i 
Chemistry, Geology, Home Ec • Math Review, Comparative Religions, Minorities, Psychology, Sociology. Every ef :| 
is made to have the Shawsheen Tech academic program on the same level as that offered at the local schools. 
This makes it possible for a student to transfer from the local school to Shawsheen Tech and be able to carr )i 
the academic requirements. 



STUDENT ENROLLMENT 



The enrollment figures as of October 1, 1976 were as follows: 



Town 9th 10th 11th 12th Total 

Bedford 30 18 25 18 91 



Billerica 120 128 109 73 430 

Burlington 64 58 57 32 211 

Tewksbury 94 92 105 70 361 



Wilmington 66 65 64 40 235 



Total 374 361 360 233 1,328 

GRADUATION 

Graduation took place on Sunday, June 6, 1976 for 203 students on the football field. It was the first year 
that the Shawsheen Tech student band performed. 



SENIOR PLACEMENT 



Employed in field 140 

Further Education 18 

Armed Services 13 

Employed in other fields 20 

Process of securing employment 12 



COST OF OPERATION 



Shawsheen Tech is categorized as a state-aided -vocational school and as such is entitled to special reimburs 
ments under Chapter 74 which are not available to the regular school systems. These funds including 50% of 
net operating cost for running a school, 100% of transportation costs, Chapter 492 funds made available only 
to regional schools in addition to monies received as a result of being in an impacted area, special educatl 
innovative programs, etc. Although there was an increase in enrollment of some 200 students, and consider 
the increase in salaries to school personnel and increase in materials, this school year, it was found that 
because of this additional state reimbursement the increased cost of operating the school was negligible. 

NEGOTIATIONS 

This year saw negotiations entered into with four groups in the school including teachers, custodians, cleri' 
and administration. Contract agreements were reached with all groups for a two year period ending June 30, j 

CHAPTER 622 and TITLE IX 

The state law. Chapter 622 and federal law. Title IX, are concerned with providing equal education opportuni 
for all regardless of sex or color. Here at Shawsheen Tech we have made special efforts to encourage girls 
go into various programs that previously have been considered for males. At this time, girls are enrolled i 
the following programs: Culinary Arts, Chem Lab Technicians, Drafting, Photography, Data Processing, Electi 
ics, as well as Business Technology and Cosmetology program. This equalization made it possible for a male 
student to be enrolled in the cosmetology program. 



80 



REAKFAST PROGRAM 



he Breakfast Program was reviewed by a representative of the State Board of Education, Department of Nutrition 
nd from HEW in Washington. It was commented that our program was outstanding and may be used as a model for 
heir schools. 

rUDENT ACTIVITIES 

ouse Building Project — the 1975-76 annual project for students in the carpentry department was concerned with 
he building of a house in Billerica. This project makes it possible for students in carpentry, masonry, 
lectrical, plumbing and metal fabrication to acquire practical skills working together to build a house. The 
illerica house was completed in the spring of 1976. Channel 4 TV visited the site and had a special program 
oncerning this project. The 1976-77 project started in September in the form of a unique colonial. This is 
eing built on Boutwell Street, Wilmington. By the end of September the frame was completed and the building 
losed, making it possible for students to complete the interior during the winter months. 

hampionship teams resulted from the hockey team which won the Commonwealth Conference, the Cross Country Team 
as number one in the Commonwealth Athletic League and the Soccer Team qualified for the State Tournament. 

ulinary Arts students placed first in the Annual Restaurant and Hotel Show which was held at the Hynes Memorial 
uditorium in Boston. 

nnual Open House this year was held in May. Special features were swimming and lifesaving demonstration in 

he pool, regional art festival in the gym, concert by the new Shawsheen Band in the cafeteria and a fashion 

how in the mall area. Students participated in the apple festival sponsored by the Massachusetts Department 

f Agriculture at the Burlington Mall. A booth was constructed by the carpentry department. Culinary students 
ere involved in the baking and sale of apple pies. 

UBLIC RELATIONS 

oard of Selectmen of the five towns were informed that students of our photography department would be avail- 
ble where possible to take pictures of the various town departments for inclusion in the town report. Repre- 
entatives of the public works departments of the five towns met at Shawsheen and were taken on a tour of the 
chool shops. They were advised that Shawsheen would cooperate by making repairs to town equipment whenever 
ossible. This would be a cost savings to the towns and provide valuable training for our students. 

hawsheen Tech hosted a meeting of the State Advisory Council of Occupational Education. This group has the 

esponsibility to advise the Associate Commissioner of Occupational Education on various matters pertaining to 

kill training in this state. There were many favorable comments as a result of this meeting. Summer School 
rogram was filmed for Channel 7 and shown on the six o'clock news broadcast. 

NSTRUCTIONAL AIDE PROGRAM 

rrangements have been made for upper class students from Shawsheen to serve as aides in the various shops and 

abs in the five towns. It has been found that this assistance has a very positive influence in helping the 

peration of the industrial arts programs. 

REA COORDINATOR OPERATION 

ur school received a grant of $61,997, the purpose of which was to develop programs concerned with career ed- 
cation including skill training. This project was completed by the end of December with all five towns par- 
icipating. Included in this operation were revision of curriculum to reflect career education, series of ten 
Job Talks" for use by the Guidance Departments of the five towns and assisting seniors in securing jobs, in- 
tallation of a Guidance Information System using the Shawsheen Tech computer with terminals in the five high 
chools making it possible to obtain up-to-date information on two and four year colleges as well as opportun- 
ties in various occupations. Mobile Learning Lab for use at Junior High Schools disseminating information on 
areer education. It is expected that a follow-up of this project will be made in order to determine the 
ffectiveness of these changes. 

INCLUSION 

hawsheen Tech, we feel, is an important part of the educational process of the District. We are constantly 
n the alert to develop new training programs and adjust to new and industrial technology in order to make our 
chool a very positive asset in all five towns. 

81 




Town Meetings 



WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - February 7, 1976 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: EITHER OF THE CONSTABLES OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws c 
said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote in Tov 
affairs to meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium, Saturday, the Seventh of February, A. D. 1976 e 
9:45 o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10:00 a.m. and shall be closed at 8:00 p.m. for th 
election of Town offices: 

ARTICLE 1. To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the following named offices, to wit: One 
Selectman for the term of three years; One Moderator for the term of one year; Two members of the School 
Committee for the term of three years; One member of the Housing Authority for the term of five years; One 
member of the Regional Vocational/Technical School Committee for the term of three years; One member of th 
Redevelopment Authority for the term of five years. 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections and town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and me ; 
in Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street in said Town of Wilmington, on Saturday, the 
Thirteenth day of March A. D. 1976 at 1:30 p.m., then and there to act on the following articles: 

In accordance with the above Warrant, the meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. John M. Callan 
at 9:45 a.m., as much of the Warrant as is noted above was read and upon a motion by Mr. Stanley Webber, a I 
seconded it was voted to dispense with further reading of the Warrant. 

All voting machines were opened and the zero sheets were posted so that the candidates could examine them 
before the polls were opened. The checkers were prepared with their voting lists and Voter Identification 
cards and everything was in readiness at 10:00 a.m. 

The polls were declared open at 10:00 a.m. by the Moderator, Mr. John M. Callan. 

At 8:00 p.m. the polls were declared closed and the printer packs were removed from the back of the voting 
machines and one copy was given to the total tally clerks and the other was posted outside the railing so 
each candidate could add his own totals at once. There were (7) seven absentee ballots cast which were ad id 
to the machine totals. 

The Town Clerk read the results of this election at 9:00 p.m. 

All the totals from the twenty-five machines plus the absentee ballots were recorded and declaration there 
made, as by law is directed and were for the following: 

SELECTMEN - Three years (Vote for one ) 
Elected James R. Miceli, 11 Webber Street 

Pauline Leiter Cola, 27 Salem Street 

Blanks 



MODERATOR - One year (Vote for one ) 
Elected John M. Callan, 571 Woburn Street 

Blanks 



1457 

232 
49 
1738 



1313 
425 
1738 



82 



NNUAL TOWN ELECTION (continued) 



CHOOL COMMITTEE - Three years (Vote for not more than two ) 

lected James A. Demos, 40 Hopkins Street 921 

David J. Dingle, 21 West Street 645 

lected Linda T. McMenimen, 14 Grace Drive 1070 

Blanks 840 

3476 

ILMINGTON HOUSING AUTHORITY - Five years (Vote for one ) 

lected Barbara H. Larson, 445 Middlesex Avenue 1340 

Blanks 398 

1738 

EGIONAL VOCATIONAL/TECHNICAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE - Three years (Vote for one ) 

lected Frank H. McLean, 5 Temple Street 1323 

Blanks 415 

1738 

ILMINGTON REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY - Five years (Vote for one ) 

lected Raymond A. McNamara, 4 Morgan Road 1422 

Blanks 316 

1738 

here were One Thousand seven hundred thirty-eight (1738) votes cast. 

ttest: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk, Wilmington 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING AND SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - March 13, 1976 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 

r. Callan, Town Moderator, made a few announcements and also explained how he would handle both meetings, 
veryone present had received an outline of Article 1 and Article 2 of the Special Town Meeting and Articles 
, 9, 10 and 11 of the Annual Town Meeting, since all of these articles are related as to subject matter. 

t 1:55 p.m. the Moderator called the meeting to order there being a quorum present. Mr. Callan read the 
arrant for the Special Town Meeting until he was interrupted by Mr. Gillis who moved to dispense with further 
eading of the Warrant and take up and make reference to each article by number. So voted. 

further motion from Mr. A. Daniel Gillis: "I move that we recess the Special Town Meeting until Article 7 
f the Annual Town Meeting has been taken up." So voted, 

,t 2:00 p.m. Mr. Callan called the Annual Town Meeting to order there being a quorum present. He asked that 
he Town Clerk note that this meeting was properly posted according to our By-Laws. 

iss Donna Wayman led the meeting in the pledge of Allegiance to the Flag. 

n the absence of the Clergy, Mr. Callan read a beautiful prayer used at West Point. The meeting was asked 
o remain standing for a quiet moment of prayer for the deceased town en^loyees eimong them being our dear 
rs. Wavie M. Drew. 

r. Callan introduced the officers for Student Government day: Miss Donna Wayman, Mr. Mark Coursey and 
r. Joseph Brooks. 

r. Callan began the reading of the Annual Town Meeting Warrant and was interrupted by a motion from the 
hairman of the Board of Selectmen, Mr. A. Daniel Gillis: "I move that the Moderator dispense with further 
eading of the warrant and take up and make reference to each article by number." So voted. 

RTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to ratify and confirm the action of the Board of Selectmen in es- 
ablishing the date of February 7, 1976 for the Election of Officers in accordance with Chapter 704 of the 
Cts of 1975, or do anything in relation thereto. 



83 



ARTICLE 2. (continued) 

Motion by Mr. James F. Banda: "I move that the Town vote to ratify and confirm the action of the Board of 
Selectmen in establishing the date of February 7, 1976 for the Election of Officers in accordance with Chap 
704 of the Acts of 1975." Finance Committee recommended approval. Motion so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 3. To hear reports of Committees and act thereon. Mr. Arthur Smith, Chairman of the Permanent 
Building Committee, read a letter addressed to Mr. Sterling Morris, Town Manager, which he asked to have fi 
with the Town Clerk. The report refers to the action taken at the Special Town Meeting of June 23, 1975 at 
which time this committee was commissioned to prepare preliminary plans and cost estimates for three differ 
building or modification programs. Later the School Committee declared a moratorium on any additional schc 
building for at least one year; with approval of the Town Manager and the Permanent Building Committee pro- 
ceeded to the completion of the commissioned program. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of paying 
unpaid bills of previous years, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that we pass over Article 4 and take no action thereon." Finance Committee 
recommended approval. Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectme 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 19 
in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes ther 
for, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. James R. Miceli: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approva 
of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year be 
ginning July 1, 1976, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to issu 
a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a per 
of less than one year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17." Finance Committee recommen 
approval. Motion voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 6. To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and the salaries o 
several Town Officers and Departments and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, tran 
fer from available funds, or otherwise, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Casey, Chairman of the Finance Committee: "I move that the several and respective sums as rec 
ommended by the Finance Committee be raised by taxation or by transfer from available funds and appropriate 
for the purpose set forth in Article 6, each item to be taken up separately and voted on, subject to amend- 
ment." Motion so voted. 

ACCORDINGLY THE FOLLOWING AMOUNTS WERE VOTED BY TAXATION OR TRANSFER: 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Selectmen-Legislative 

Salaries $ 2,500.i 

Expenses 6.250.' 

8,750.1 

Selectmen-Elections 

Salaries 11,000.( 

Expenses 8,838.( 

19,838.1 

Registrar of Voters 

Salaries 2,550.1 

Expenses 7,000.( 

9,550.( 

Finance Committee 

Salaries 600.( 

Expenses 4.325.( 

4,925.( 



84 



Town Manager 

Salaries - Town Manager $ 30,000,00 

Other Salaries 26,686.00 

Expenses 1,150.00 

57,836.00 

Community & Economic Development 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Town Accountant 

Salaries - Town Accountant • 17,913.00 

Other Salaries 10,717.00 

Expenses 550.00 

29,180.00 

Treasurer 

Salaries - Administrative Assistant 16,069.00 

Other Salaries 10,195.00 

Expenses 1,825.00 

Tax Title Foreclosures 5.000.00 

33,089.00 

Collector 

Salaries - Collector 13,347.00 

Other Salaries 10,127.00 

Expenses 4,760.00 

28,234.00 

Town Clerk 

Salaries - Town Clerk 13,628.00 

Other Salaries 10,422.00 

Expenses 650.00 

24,700.00 

Board of Assessors 

Salaries - Principal Assessor 21,607.00 

Other Salaries 17,500.00 

Expenses 3,200.00 

42,307.00 

Town Counsel 

Salaries (Retainer) 10,000.00 

Expenses (Court Appearances) 7 ,500.00 

17,500.00 

Town Hall 

Salaries 16,245.00 

Expenses 20.800.00 

37,045.00 

Planning Board 

Salaries 3,000.00 

Expenses 20,250.00 

Capital Outlay 

23,250.00 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 336,204.00 

PROTECTION PERSONS & PROPERTY 
Police Department 

Salaries - Chief 28,039.00 

Lieutenant 17,805.00 



85 



Police Department (continued) 

Sergeants $ 

Patrolmen 

(Motion by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $330,174 be appropriated for Police Department 
Salaries - Patrolmen; the sum of $190,174 to be raised by transfer from the Revenue Sharing 
Account, the sum of $140,000 be raised by transfer from Free Cash, with a balance of zero to 
be raised by taxation." So voted. Motion as amended so voted 

Traffic Supervisors 

Clerks 

Vacation Pay 

Sick Leave Pay 

Miscellaneous Extra Details 

Paid Holidays 

Police Dog 

Specialist 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 



Constable 

Salaries 

Fire Department 

Salaries - Chief 

Deputy Chief 

Lieutenants 

Privates 

(Motion by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $316,184 be appropriated for Fire Department 
Salaries - Privates; and that the sum of $232,006 be raised by transfer from Revenue Sharing 
Account with a balance of $84,178 to be raised by taxation." So voted. Main motion as amended 
so voted. 

Call Fire & Ambulance 

Vacations 

Sick Leave 

Paid Holidays 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Civil Defense 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 



Dog Officer 

Salaries 

(Motion by Mr. Joseph Balestrieri, Dog Officer, "I move to amend under line item Dog Officer 
Salaries to $11,500, in order to make this a full time position in the Town." Vote taken by 
voice and it was declared lost. Seven doubted the vote. New vote taken by standing 
YES - 135 NO - 149 Vote lost. 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Building Inspector 

Salaries - Building Inspector 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 



Board of Appeals 
Salaries . . . 
Expenses . . . 



86 



Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Salaries $ 1,375.00 

Expenses 50. 00 

1,425.00 

rOTAL PROTECTION PERSONS AND PROPERTY 670,648.00 

PUBLIC WORKS 
Town Engineer 

Salaries - Town Engineer 21,509.00 

Other Salaries 47,432.00 

Expenses 2,100.00 

Capital Outlay 

^ 71,041.00 

Highway 

Salaries - Superintendent 20,000.00 

Other Salaries 207,919.00 

Expenses 143,800.00 

Drainage Projects 25,000.00 

Sidewalk Program 50,000,00 

Public Street Lights 100,000.00 

Road Machinery - Expenses 31,016.00 

(Motion by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $41,000 be appropriated for Road Machinery - 
Expenses; $9,984 to be raised by transfer from the Road Machinery Fund Account, and the 
balance of $31,016 to be raised by taxation," So voted. Main motion as amended so voted.) 

Chapter 90 Construction 37,232.00 

Chapter 90 Maintenance 9,000.00 

623,967.00 



Chapter 81 Maintenance 

(Motion by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $43,232 be appropriated for Chapter 81 
>Iaintenance ; and that the sum of $43,232 be raised by transfer from Chapter 825, Acts of 
1974, with a balance of zero to be raised by taxation." So voted. Main motion as amended 
so voted.) 



Snow & Ice Control 

Salaries 60,226.00 

1^ Expenses 82,000.00 

142,226.00 

Tree Warden 

Salaries 21,808.00 

Expenses 7,100,00 

Capital Outlay 950.00 

Dutch Elm Control 

Salaries 18,504.00 

Expenses 2,900.00 

Gypsy Moth Control 

Salaries 13,418.00 

Expenses 2,500.00 

67,180,00 

Cemetery 

Salaries - Superintendent 14,540,00 

Other Salaries 51,347,00 

Expenses 4,870.00 



(Motion by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $18,900 be appropriated for Cemetery 
Department Expenses; $14,030 to be raised by transfer from the sale of cemetery lots 
account and a balance of $4,870 to be raised by taxation." So voted. Main motion as 
amended so voted.) 

Capital Outlay 2,850.00 

73,607.00 



87 



Parks 

Salaries $ 5,000.0C 

Expenses 1,000.0( 

6,000.0( 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 984, 021. 0( 

HEALTH & SANITATION 
Board of Health 

Salaries - Director 18,332.0( 

Other Salaries 39,935.0( 

Expenses 2,250.0( 

Hospital & Medical Care 850. 0( 

Garbage 35,000,0( 

(Motion by Mrs. Madelyn A. McKie: "I move that we postpone indefinitely any action on 
Garbage Collection, Board of Health, Health and Sanitation at this time. So voted to 
postpone action. Final action, 3/20/76 voted.) 

Town Dump 130, 000. 0( 



(Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that we postpone Town Diimp, Board of Health-Health and 
Sanitation until such time as a vote has been taken on Articles 1 and 2 of the Special 
Town meeting and/or Articles 8, 9 10 and 11 of the Annual Town Meeting." Voted to 
postpone this line item at this time. On Mr. Miceli's motion final action, 3/20/76 voted. 



Dump main motion as amended so voted.) 

Drug Dependency Problems 13,500.0( 

Mental Health Out -Patient 17,020.0( 

(Motion by Mrs. Mildred Wolff: "I move to amend the figure of $16,000 to $17,020". > 

Motion to amend so voted. Main motion as amended so voted.) ! 

Lowell Mental Health 2,500.0( 

TOTAL HEALTH & SANITATION 259,387.0(1 

VETERANS* AID 

Veterans' Aid & Benefits 

Salaries - Part time Agent 2,860.00 

Other Salaries 8,310.0( 

Expenses 390. 0(! 

Assistance, Veterans 75,000.0( 1 

86,560.0(1 

MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS , 
School Maintenance & Operations 

Salaries - Superintendent 18,210.0(' 

Salaries - Other 566,759.0(1 

Expenses 133, 500. 0(] 

Fuel Heating 175,000.0(j 

Roof Repairs 56,000.0(, 

Capital Outlay 19,700.0( 

969, 169. Of; 

School Grounds Maintenance 

Expenses ' . . . . 9,800.0( 

Capital Outlay 8,000.01 

17,800.01 

Town Building Maintenance 

Expenses 76,500.0i], 

Capital Outlay 3,000.0i . 

79,500.01 

TOTAL MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 1,066, 469.01 

I 

LIBRARY 

Board of Library Trustees 



88 



Library (continued) 

Salaries - Director $ 17,696.00 

Salaries - Other 91,815.00 

Expenses 61,337.00 

(Motion by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $67,750 be appropriated for the Library 

Expenses Account; $6,413 to be raised by transfer from State Aid to Public Libraries 

Account and the balance of $61,337 to be raised by taxation." Amendment so voted. 

Kain motion as amended so voted.) 

Capital Outlay 2,718.00 

173,566.00 



RECREATION 

Salaries - Director 16,648.00 

Salaries - Other 74,293.00 

Expenses 31,070.00 

rOTAL RECREATION 122,011.00 

PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Salaries 1,000.00 

Expenses 100.00 

1,100.00 

BEAUTIFICATION COMMITTEE 

Expenses 1,838.00 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Personal Services 1,000.00 

Expenses 10.850.00 

11,850.00 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Personal Services 1,000.00 
Expenses 2,950.00 

3,950.00 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

(Motion by Mr. John Brooks: "I move that it be and hereby is the determination of the 
School Committee that the sum of $6,790,669.00 is the amount necessary for the support 
and operation of the public schools in the Town of Wilmington for the 1976-1977 fiscal 
year, and that the budget for 1976-1977 be reduced by the estimated remaining unspent 
funds in the federal accounts under public laws 864 and 874 in the amount of $60,000,00 
leaving an amount of $6,730,669.00 to be raised by taxation. Under discussion 
Mr. Buczynski moved to amend the amount to be raised by taxation with this motion: "I 
move that the School Department amount of $6,730,669.00 be changed to $6,729,669.00," 
After some discussion Dr. Sullivan of the School Committee suggested that we pass over 
this amendment. Mr. Buczynski asked permission to withdraw his motion. Voted to allow 
the amendment to be withdrawn.) 



Salaries & Operation 6,790,669.00 

' Less Federal Funds 60,000.00 

! 6,730,669.00 

' Vocational Training 6,000.00 

Regional Vocational School District 446,798.00 



(Motion by Mr. Frank H, McLean, Regional Voc, School Committee member: "I move that the sum 
'of $446,798 as recommended by the Finance Committee be amended to $531,798, being that sum 
las originally requested by the Shawsheen Valley Regional School Committee, And further 
[that the sum of $531,798.00 be raised and appropriated by taxation," This amendment lost 
on a voice vote. 



TOTAL SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 7,183,467,00 



89 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Personal Services $ 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 

Schools 

General Government 

(Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that we postpone Maturing Debt, Interest-General Government 
(#1005) until such time as a vote has been taken on Articles 1 and 2 of the Special Town 
Meeting and/or Articles 8, 9, 10 and 11 of the Annual Town Meeting." Voted to postpone. 
Final action 3/20/76.) 

Water 

(Motion by Mr. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $135,853 be appropriated for Maturing Debt 
and Interest - Water; $135,853 to be raised by transfer from Water Available Surplus with 
a balance of zero to be raised by taxation. So voted. Voted as amended.) 

Sewer 

Authentication Fees & Misc. Debt 

TOTAL MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 

UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 

Insurance & Bonds 

(Motion by Mr. Richard D. Duggan: "I move that the sum of $149,531 be appropriated for 
Insurance and Bonds; $129,400 to be raised by transfer from Free Cash; $1,131 by transfer 
from the Insurance Dividend Account with a balance of $19,000 to be raised by taxation. 
Motion so voted. Motion as amended so voted.) 

Reserve 

Blue Cross -Blue Shield & Group Life 

(Motion by Mr. Richard Duggan: "I move the sum of $348,000 be appropriated for Blue Cross- 
Blue Shield and Group Life; $2,172.87 to be raised by transfer from Account #1187 (West 
Street); $1,216.51 by transfer from Account #1218 (Install Lights -Shawsheen School); 
$1,322.38 by transfer from Account #1219 (Install Lights-North Intermediate School); 
$104,469.24 by transfer from Free Cash; $140,000 by transfer from Revenue Sharing; and 
the balance of $98,819 to be raised by taxation. Amendment by Mrs. Madelyn A. McKie: 
"I move that we postpone Blue Cross/Blue Shield and Group Life Insurance, Unclassified and 
Reserve, until such time as a vote has been taken on Articles 1 and 2 of the Special Town 
Meeting and Articles 8, 9, 10, and 11 of the Annual Town Meeting." After a great deal of 
heated discussion a vote came by voice. No on the amendment to postpone. Motion lost. 
Voted $98,819.00 by taxation as in Mr. Duggan's motion above. Mr. Duggan's motion so voted. 
Mr. William Hooper's motion to raise by taxation another amount was also lost.) 

Local Transportation 

Town Report 

Sewer Maintenance 

Bicentennial Commission 

(Motion by Mr. F. Carrasco, Chairman of Commission: "I move to amend under Unclassified and 
Reserve line item Bicentennial Commission from zero request in appropriation to $2,500.00 
appropriation requested." Motion so voted. Amendment so voted.) 

Appraisals 

Training & Conference - In State 

Training & Conference - Out of State 

Veteran's Retirement 

Employee Retirement (Unused Sick Leave Account) 

Microfilming & Reader 

Incentive Pay-Police 

Incentive Pay- Fire 

1976 Salary Adjustments & Additional Costs 

Additional Employees by Department 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE $ 

Total Budget By Taxation $12,209,140.00 
Total Budget By Transfers 1,151,404.00 

90 



48,575.. 



473,253. 
112,712.. 



7,445.( 
3,000.1 
4,000.( 
2,500.( 



15, 000. ( 
8,645.( 
3,000.( 

35, 000. ( 
4,000.( 
2,000.( 

11, 000. ( 
3,600.( 
175, 000. ( 



442, 009. (i 




Finished work on the budget at 5:50 p.m. 

Voted to recess for supper and reconvene at 8:00 p.m. here in the Gymnasium, March 13, 1976. Number of voters 
checked in at afternoon session 459. 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting and Special Town Meeting - March 13, 1976 

Ar. John M. Callan, Moderator, called the meeting to order at 8:07 p.m., there being a quorum present. 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purchase of the 
several following items of capital expenditures and further to authorize the sale or turn-in, if any, of the 
several items listed below, and for the use of the several departments so designated: 

ylotion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate designated sums for the 
purchase of the several items of capital expenditures and to authorize the sale or turn-in of the several 
items so designated, each item to be voted separately." Motion so voted. 

a. Police Department 

To purchase five Police vehicles. 

Motion: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $25,000 for the purchase 
of five Police vehicles, and at the discretion of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of five 
vehicles presently used by the Police Department." Finance Committee approved $25,000. Motion so voted. 

b. Fire Department 

Motion: "I move that we pass over Article 7, Section b. Fire Department and take no action thereon." 
So voted. 

c. Engineering Department 

Motion: "I move that we pass over Article 7, Section c. Engineering Department and take no action there- 
on." So voted. 

d. Highway Department 

1. To purchase one 5 to 7 yard dump truck. 

Motion: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $17,000 for the pur- 
chase of a 5 to 7 yard dump truck with coverall assembly for the use of the Highway Department, and at 
the discretion of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of a dump truck presently used by the 
Highway Department." Finance Committee approved $17,000. Motion so voted. 

2. Motion: "I move that we pass over Article 7, Section d2, Highway Department, and take no action 
thereon. So voted. 

3. To purchase a street sweeper. 

Motion: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $42,000 for the pur- 
chase of a street sweeper for the use of the Highway Department, and at the discretion of the Town 
Manager authorize the sale or turn- in of the street sweeper presently used by the Highway Department." 
Finance Committee approved $42,000. Motion so voted. 

4. To purchase a stone spreader. 

Motion: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $7,500 for the purchase 
of a stone spreader for the use of the Highway Department, and at the discretion of the Town Manager 
authorize the sale or turn-in of the stone spreader presently used by the Highway Department." Finance 
Committee approved $7,500. Motion so voted. 

5. Motion: "I move that we pass over Article 7, Section d5 Highway Department and take no action 
thereon. So voted. 

6. To purchase a sander body. 

Motion: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $5,000 for the pur- 
chase of a Sander body for the use of the Highway Department, and at the discretion of the Town Manager 
authorize the sale or turn- in of a sander body presently used by the Highway Department." Finance 
Committee approved $5,000. Motion so voted. 

7. Tree Department. Motion: "I move that we pass over Article 7e, Tree Department, and take no action 
thereon. So voted. 

91 



Per motion by Mr. Gillis to recess The Special Town Meeting until Article 7 of the Annual Town Meeting has 
been taken up, this being accomplished we are now in the Special Town Meeting. 



IS 



Special Town Meeting - March 13, 1976 

Mr. Callan called the meeting to order at 8:20 p.m. He stated he would allow all discussions and motions 
from both meetings . 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of develo| 
ing a sanitary land fill area for solid waste disposal on land presently owned and acquired by the Town foj 
that purpose pursuant to a motion made under Article 21 of the Annual Town Meeting of March 20, 1971, in- 
cluding engineering, surveying, architectural and planning costs, site development, construction of access 
roads, water and power lines in connection therewith, and the construction of buildings, in structures or 
facilities and the acquisition of equipment in connection therewith, to determine how an appropriation sha] 
be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise; and to 
petition the General Court for the passage of any special law necessary to validate any vote passed under 
this Article; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Paul A. Sadowski: "I move that the town vote to appropriate the sum of $190,000 for the pur- 
pose of developing a sanitary landfill area for solid waste disposal on land presently owned and acquired I 
the Town for that purpose pursuant to a motion made under Article 21 of the Annual Town Meeting of March 2( 
1971, including engineering, surveying, architectural and planning costs, site development, construction ol 
access roads, water and power lines in connection therewith, and the construction of buildings, structures 
or facilities and the acquisition of equipment in connection therewith; and to meet said appropriation, thi 
the sum of $3,339.19 be transferred from account #1110 (Woburn Street School), that the sum of $2,565.04 be 
transferred from account #1111 (Woburn Street Addition), that the sum of $43,938.14 be transferred from 
account #1115 (Shawsheen Avenue School), that the sum of $9,747.22 be transferred from account #1130 (West 
Intermediate School), that the sum of $40,410.41 be transferred from account #1140 (Wilmington Memorial 
Library), and to authorize the Treasurer with the approval of the Selectmen to borrow the sum of $90,000 at 
one time, or from time to time, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town therefor; each issue of such bonds 
or notes to be payable in not more than twenty (20) years from its date, and that the town hereby petitions 
the General Court for the passage of a Special Law to authorize and validate the provisions of this vote." 

Mr. Callan allowed the discussion to flow so that everyone could be heard on this Article. From time to 
time Mr. Altman, Town Counsel, was called on to clarify our position in conjunction with the Attorney 
General's regulations for our present dump which is shortly to be closed by that office unless we come up 
with an acceptable amount of money to put this dump in a sanitary condition. 

Amendment by Mr, Earl Hupper: "I Earl Hupper make a motion at the Special Town Meeting that the town vote a 
sum of $50,000 to be raised by taxation and for the Board of Selectmen to solicit bids from private con- 
tractors to develop a landfill site at site #1 and to vote to raise a sum of $300,000 by taxation to contra 
with the private contractor operate the landfill site for a three year period." 

After a further debate a motion to cut off debate came. Yes 264, No 3. Motion carried to cut off debate. 
Vote on the amendment was taken by voice and was declared lost. 

Mr. Paul Sadowski' s main motion Yes 157 (by bonds or notes requires a 2/3rds vote) No 105. Motion fails fc 
want of a 2/rds vote. 

Letter from the Town of Burlington, Board of Selectmen: 

March 13, 1976 

Mr. John M. Callan, Moderator 

Town of Wilmington 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 01887 

Dear Mr. Moderator: 

Concerning Article #1 (re: Town Land Fill), on your forthcoming Town Warrant, we the undersigned members of 
the Board of Selectmen would like to express our opposition to same on grounds of the potential health haza 
that it poses. Specifically, we feel that such a land fill near the Town of Burlington and especially its 
water supply would be a breeding ground for insects and rodents. 



92 



I 

Letter from the Town of Burlington Board of Selectmen (continued) 



As a means of registering our opposition to this proposal, we ask that this communique be read at your Town 
Meeting and spread upon the records of same. 



ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate by taxation or transfer from available funds, 
a sum of money for the purpose of operating the Town sanitary landfill for the disposal of solid waste; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Petition of Paul A. Sadowski: Moved to pass over this Article and take no action, so voted. 

Mrs. William Hooper asked the meeting to recess the Special Town Meeting. Vote taken by voice and declared 
carried. Seven voters rose to question the vote. Standing - Yes 179 No 96. So voted. 

Special Town Meeting recessed at 10:55 p.m. 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING RECONVENED at 10:55 p.m. 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of develop- 
ing a sanitary landfill area on land owned by the Town, specifically excluding that parcel of land taken by 
the Town of Wilmington pursuant to Article 21 of the adjourned Annual Town Meeting dated March 20, 1971, or 
for the purchase of land for solid waste disposal, including engineering, surveying, architectural and 
planning costs, site development, construction of access roads, water and power lines in connection there- 
with, and the construction of buildings, structures or facilities and the acquisition of equipment in con- 
nection therewith, to determine whether said appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or otherwise and to 
petition the General Court for the passage of any special law necessary to validate any vote passed under 
this article, or take any other action with respect to the foregoing. 

Motion by Mr. Miceli to pass over and take no action on this article. So voted. 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of operating 
the Town Sanitary Landfill for the disposal of solid waste or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Wilson Belbin to pass over this article and take no action on said article #9. So voted. 

Motion to adjourn came at 12:05 a.m. (Special Town Meeting adjourned there being no further Articles to 
come before it.) So voted. 

The Motion to adjourn Annual Town Meeting contained the following: There will be consideration under 
Article 6 (Budget) on those postponed articles, Town Diomp, Garbage Collection, and Maturing Debt - Interest - 
General Government and Reconsideration of Dog Officers salary. 

This meeting to be reconvened on Saturday, March 20, 1976 at 1:30 p.m. at the High School Gymnasium. 
I So voted. 

jNumber of voters checked in on March 13, 1976: Afternoon 459 - Evening 352. 



The Moderator opened the meeting at 2:00 p.m., there being a quorum present. 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of develop- 
ing a waste transfer station including the cost of the construction of buildings, structures, roads or 
facilities and the acquisition of equipment and labor in connection therewith on land owned by the Town 
specifically excluding that parcel of land taken by the Town of Wilmington pursuant to Article 21 of the 
adjourned Annual Town Meeting dated March 20, 1971; and for the disposal of all solid waste at a location 
out of town, or do anything in relation thereto. 



I 



Seal 



s/Thomas J. Flaherty, Jr. 
s/Angelo A. Murgo, Chairman 
s/Michael J. Wislowski, V. Chairman 
s/John P. Miller 
s /Howard E. Strachan, Jr. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - March 20. 1976 



93 



ARTICLE 10. (continued) 

Motion by Mr. Mlcell to pass over this article at this time and take no action thereon. So voted. 

Motion by Mr, Morris: "I move that we advance and take up at this time Article 6, line Item - Town Dun^." 
So voted. 



Motion by Mr. Morris, Town Manager: "I move that we vote to amend Article 6, line Item - Town Dump to the si 
of $135,000.00 for the purpose of entering Into a contract for the disposal of solid waste out of town and t 
permit said contractor to locate a waste transfer station on land owned by the town off Main Street or some 
other suitable location on town owned land as approved by the Board of Health, said sum to be appropriated s! 
raised by taxation." 

After some discussion a Mr. Robert Fletcher was Introduced by Mr. Mlcell and the Moderator allowed him to te . 
the meeting how his company could handle our dump problem. More discussion then the Moderator asked the mee • 
Ing if they were ready for the question. 

Mr. Callan read Mr. Morris' amendment. Standing vote Yes 99 No 117 amendment lost. 

Mr. Mlcell asked reconsideration of the amendment. Standing Yes 92 No 127 amendment lost. 

Motion by Mr. James R. Mlcell: "I move at this time that we amend line item - Town Dump to read $130,000." 

Standing Yes 103 No 93. Motion so voted. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "1 move that we advance and take up at this time Article 6, line item Maturing Debt 
Interest - General Government." So voted. 



Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that we appropriate and raise by taxation the sum of $112,712 under Article 6 
Maturing Debt - Interest - General Government." So voted. 



Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that we advance and take up at this time. Article 6, line item Garbage Collect; 
ion." So voted. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that we appropriate and raise by taxation the sum of $35,000.00 under Article 
line item Garbage Collection". Motion so voted. 

The meeting voted to allow reconsideration of the Dog Officer's salary. 



Motion by Mr. Joseph Balestrieri: "I move to amend under line item Dog Officer Salaries to $11,500. in orde 
to make this a full time position in the town." 

Voice vote taken and declared by the Moderator "motion lost". 

All postponed articles and reconsideration in budget finished at 5:05 p.m. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of provic 
ing a municipal residential combined refuse collection system of garbage and rubbish in conjunction with 
Article 9 or Article 10, or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. George W, Boylen, Jr.,: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the st 
of $192,500 for the purpose of providing a municipal residential combined refuse collection system of garba^ 
and rubbish." 

After some discussion Mr. Paul Godzyk offered an amendment: "I move that #1 The Town of Wilmington appropri 
ate $300,000 for the curbslde collection of all household garbage and rubbish within the Town of Wilmington 
for one year on a three year contract. #2 That the rubbish is to be disposed of at the Town #1 site or by 
arrangement with the present owner of the dump being used or sent out of town. #3 Job to be done to the 
satisfaction of all authorities both local and state regarding sanitary land fill. #4 This money is to be 
raised by taxation. 

Vote on amendment was taken by voice. The amendment loses. 

Vote on main motion as presented by Mr, Boylen; this motion loses and is so declared by the Moderator, 

ARTICLE 12, To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $2,000 for the observance of 
Memorial Day and Veterans' Day, and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall arrange and have chargt 
of said observances, or do anything in relation thereto. 



94 



ARTICLE 12. (continued) 

Motion by Mr. James Banda: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $2,000 
for the observance of Memorial Day and Veterans' Day, and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall 
arrange and have charge of said observances." Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $750 each (or a total of 
$1,500) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended 
the lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign War Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for 
the Nee-Ellsworth Post #2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. 

b. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the 
H Wilmington Post #136 of the American Legion, or do anything in relation thereto. 

The following motion was made by James F. Banda: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appro- 
priate the sum of $750 each (or a total of $1,500) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 
of Chapter 40 of the General Laws as amended the lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for 
the Nee-Ellsworth Post 7^2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States. 

b. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters for the 
Wilmington Post #136 of the American Legion. 

After some discussion a standing vote was taken: Yes 52 " No 55 Motion lost. 

Mr. Carrasco moved to reconsider Article 13. So voted. 

Mr. Belbin questioned a quorum. Tellers brought in a count of 160 present. (150 represents a quorum). 

After more discussion a voice vote was taken and the Moderator declared the "Ayes" have it and the main 
motion is so voted. 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town Manager to 
apply for, accept, and enter into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any funds allotted to 
Wilmington by the U, S. Federal Government under any Federal grant program, or do anything in relation 
thereto. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town Manager 
to apply for, accept, and enter into contracts until the next Annual Town Meeting for the expenditure of any 
funds allotted to Wilmington by the U. S. Federal Government under any Federal grant program." Motion so 
voted. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to acquire land for street 
and/or drainage purposes; and to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain or receive as a 
gift the certain parcels of land bound and described as follows: 

Map 8, Parcel 57 - Forest Street. Easterly by Forest Street, 27 feet; northerly by Forest Street, 127 
feet; Westerly by lot 234, 115 feet; southerly by lot 231, 80 feet; being lots 232 and 233 containing 
6,140 square feet, all as shown on a plan entitled, "Wilmington Manor, Wilmington, Mass., owned by 
Frank W. Coughlin, Scale 1" = 100', Boston, September 1909, H. A. Millhouse, Civil Engineer; a copy of 
which is on file in the office of the Town Engineer; Map 8, Parcel 72 - Forest Street; easterly by Forest 
Street, 78 feet; northerly by lot 316, 85 feet; westerly by lot 321, 75 feet; southerly by lot 312, 82 
feet; being lots 312, 313, & 314 containing 5,925 square feet all as shown on said plan, a copy of which 
is on file in the office of the Town Engineer; meaning and intending to acquire the above described 
parcels of land described as Lots 232, 233, 312, 313 and 314, all as shown on the above referenced plan 
however otherwise said lots are bounded, measured or described or whatever the contents; and to determine 
how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrow- 
ing, or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. The Finance Committee recommends approval of 
$1,400. 

lotion by Mr. A. Daniel Gillis: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
Jl,400 to acquire land for street and/or drainage purposes; and to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take 



95 



ARTICLE 15. (continued) 

by eminent domain or receive as a gift the certain parcels of land bound and described as follows: (Here 
the Moderator interrupted Mr, Gillis to ask if the description in the article and the motion agree, the 
answer was yes. Further reading of said description in the motion was dispensed with. 

The Finance Committee approved $1,400. The motion was voted unanimously to raise by taxation $1,400 and 
appropriate this amount for the purpose as outlined in Article 15. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to alter and relocate as a Town way. Forest Street from Burlingtor 
Avenue to Aldrich Road as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisic 
of General Laws (Chapter 82, as amended, relating to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuar 
of Public Ways and specific repairs thereon), which alteration and relocation is filed in the office of the 
Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein, is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to 
authorize the Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope, drainage or other easements as 
may be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article; and to determine how an appropriation shall be raise 
whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise for the purpose of con- 
struction of said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land, slope, drainage 
other easements therefor; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommended approval of 
$28,000. 

Mr. Miceli moved the adoption of the above Article #16. The description in the Article and the Motion agree 
and to effect the purpose of this Article the Town raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $14,100. Tt 
Finance Committee approved $28,000. Motion voted unanimously and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to accept as a Town way the layout of Adelaide Street from Church 
Street to Middlesex Avenue as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the pro 
visions of General Laws (Chapter 82, as amended, relating to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Dis 
continuance of Public Ways and specific repairs thereon), which layout is filed in the office of the Town 
Clerk, and which, with plans therein, is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authoriz 
the Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope, drainage or other easements as may be 
necessary to effect the purpose of this Article; and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, 
whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise for the purpose of con- 
struction of said way and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land, slope, drainage 
or other easements therefor; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommended approval of 
$50. 

Mr. Miceli moved the adoption of the above Article #17, the description in the Article and the Motion agree, 
and to effect the purpose of this Article the Town raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $50.00. The 
Finance Committee approved $50.00. Motion voted unanimously and so declared by the Moderator. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to discontinue as a Town way the layout of part of Shawsheen Avenv 
as established in Layout No. 6011 by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts on behalf of the Town, as recommendec 
by the Planning Board, which discontinuance is filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans 
therein is hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Selectmen to retain in 
the above land an easement for utilities including but not limited to sewer, water, and drain; and to authoi 
ize Selectmen to dispose of the land remaining after the discontinuance; and to determine how an appropriati 
shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds by borrowing or otherwise for the 
purpose of payment of any damages resulting from the discontinuance; or do anything in relation thereto. 
Finance Committee recommended approval of $50.00. 

Motion by Mr. Morris to ad op t^ the above Article 18, the description in the Article and the Motion agree, anc 
to effect the purpose of this Article the Town raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $50.00. The 
Finance Committee approved $50.00. Motion voted unanimously and so declared by the Moderator. 

At this point in the meeting the Moderator declared we recess (5:30 p.m.) to 7:30 p.m. 



The evening meeting reconvened at 7:30 p.m. 
8:25 p.m. 



The Moderator waited for a quorum which finally was made up at 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Water and Sewer Commissioners to acquire any fee, 
easement, or other interest together with temporary construction easements by eminent domain, purchase, gift 
or otherwise necessary to effect the improvements to the Town sewerage system voted under Article 12 of the 
Special Town Meeting of June 23, 1975, said easements being described as follows: 

96 




I 



lAPTER 19. (continued) 

beginning at a point in the southerly sideline of Eames Street, said point being the northeasterly corner 
of an existing sewer easement, thence N 44 degrees 04'03" E by said sideline distant 22.67 feet to a point, 
thence S 17 degrees 49'59" E through land of Stevens Family Trust distant 53.09 feet to a point, thence S 
72 degrees 10 '01" W by said land distant 20.00 feet to a point, thence N 17 degrees 49 '59" W by said land 
and by the easterly sideline of said existing sewer easement distant 42.41 feet to the point of beginning; 
beginning at a point in the northerly sideline of Eames Street, said point being the southwesterly corner 
of land of Surface Coatings Inc., thence N 38 degrees 04'30" W by land of the B & M Railroad distant 31.30 
feet to a point, thence N 60 degrees 15' 18" E through land of Surface Coatings Inc. distant 29.80 feet to 
a point, thence S 36 degrees 19'09" E through land of Surface Coatings Inc. distant 23.42 feet to a point, 
thence S 44 degrees 50'30" W by said sideline of Eames Street distant 28.99 feet to the point of beginning; 
beginning at a point in the northerly sideline of Eames Street, said point being the southwesterly corner 
of land of Surface Coatings Inc., thence S 44 degrees 50' 30" W distant 20.15 feet by said sideline of 
Eames Street to a point, thence N 38 degrees 04' 30" W distant 243.63 feet through land of the B & M Rail- 
road to a point, thence bearing to the left with a curve of 6037.75feet radius distant 499.40 feet through 
said land to a point, thence N 42 degrees 48 '48" W distant 194.22 feet to a point, thence N 70 degrees 
33' 12" E distant 21.79 feet by the northerly sideline of land of the B & M Railroad to a point, thence S 
42 degrees 48'48" E distant 185.58 feet by the easterly sideline of land of the B & M Railroad to a point, 
thence bearing to the right with a curve of 6057.75 feet radius distant 501.05 feet by said sideline to a 
point, thence S 38 degrees 04'30" E distant 241.14 by said sideline to the point of beginning; beginning 
at a point in the easterly sideline of land of the B & M Railroad, said point being marked by stone bound, 
thence N 42 degrees 48'48" W by said sideline distant 185.58 feet to a point, thence S 70 degrees 33' 12" 
W by the southerly sideline of land of the B & M Railroad distant 15.84 feet to a point, thence N 41 
degrees 46'00" W through land of Surface Coatings Inc. distant 205.90 feet to a point, then N 32 degrees 
46 '00" W through land of Surface Coatings Inc. and land of Beatrice Foods Company distant 409.35 feet to 
a point, thence S 81 degrees 40' 35" W through land of Beatrice Food Company distant 80.37 feet to a point, 
thence N 29 degrees 47 '20" W through said land distant 356.06 feet to a point, thence N 38 degrees 24 '00" 
W through said land distant 373.65 feet to a point, thence S 83 degrees 07 '00" W through said land distant 
31.88 feet to a point, thence N 07 degrees 51'58" W by the easterly sideline of Main Street distant 20.00 
feet to a point, N 83 degrees 07 '00" E through said land distant 43.42 feet to a point, thence S 38 degrees 
24'00" E through said land distant 386.35 feet to a point, thence S 29 degrees 47'20" E through said land 
distant 343.94 feet to a point, thence N 81 degrees 40'35" E through said land distant 79.63 feet to a 
point, thence S 32 degrees 46'00" E by Beatrice Foods Company and Surface Coating Inc. distant 420.65 
feet to a point, thence S 41 degrees 46'00" E by Surface Coatings Inc. distant 395.86 feet to a point, 
thence S 47 degrees 11 '12" W by said land distant 1.96 feet to the point of beginning; beginning at a 
point in the westerly sideline of Main Street, said point being southerly and distant 149.76 feet from 
the southerly terminous of a curve of 1983.54 feet radius, thence S 07 degrees 51*58" E by said sideline 
distant 20.00 feet to a point, thence S 83 degrees 07'00" W through land of Ristuccia Children's Trust 
distant 67.62 feet to a point, thence N 42 degrees 48'48" W through said land distant 395.10 feet to a 
point, thence S 47 degrees 11 '12" W through said land distant 7.07 feet to a point, thence N 42 degrees 
48'48" W by the easterly sideline of land of the B & M Railroad distant 20.00 feet to a point, thence N 
i 47 degrees 11'12" E through land of Ristuccia Children's Trust distant 27.07 feet to a point, thence S 
42 degrees 48 '48" E through said land distant 404.90 feet to a point, thence N 83 degrees 07 '00" E through 
said land distant 57.07 feet to the point of beginning; beginning at a point in the easterly sideline of 
land of the B & M Railroad, said point being easterly and distant 33.00 feet from the railroad baseline 
station 752 + 62.17, thence S 47 degrees 11'12" W distant 66.00 feet through land of the B & M Railroad to 
a point, thence N 42 degrees 48'48" W distant 20.00 feet by the westerly sideline of land of the B & M 
Railroad, thence N 47 degrees 11' 12" E distant 66.00 feet through land of the B & M Railroad to a point, 
thence S 42 degrees 48'48" E distant 20.00 feet by the easterly sideline of land of the B & M Railroad to 
the point of beginning; beginning at a point in the westerly sideline of land of the B & M Railroad, said 
point being westerly and distant 33.00 feet from railroad baseline station 752 + 62.17, thence S 47 degrees 
11 '12" W through land of the Town of Wilmington distant 21.85 feet to a point, thence N 43 degrees 16 ' 24" 
W through land of the Town of Wilmington Webber, and Manufacturer's Street distant 1014.96 feet to a point, 
thence N 42 degrees 48 '48" W through Diorio, Mahoney and Powers distant 448.36 feet to a point, thence N 
40 degrees 31'56" E by the southerly sideline of Butters Row distant 20.14 feet to a point, thence S 42 
degrees 48'48" E through land of Powers, Mahoney, Diorio and Manufacturer's Way distant 450.61 feet to a 
point, thence S 43 degrees 16 '24" E through land of Manufacturer's Way, Webber and the Town of Wilmington 
distant 995.04 feet to a point, thence N 47 degrees 11 '12" E through land of the Town of Wilmington dis- 
tant 2.01 feet to a point, thence S 42 degrees 48'48" E by the westerly sideline of land of the B & M 
Railroad distant 20.00 feet to the point of beginning; beginning at a point in the northerly sideline of 
Butters Row said point being westerly and distant 10.12 feet from the westerly sideline of land of the 
B & M Railroad, thence S 38 degrees 22' 14" W by said sideline of Butters Row distant 20.24 feet to a point, 
thence N 42 degrees 48'48" W through land of Bedell distant 640.32 feet to a point, thence N 46 degrees 



97 



ARTICLE 19. (continued) 

17 '39" W through said land distant 280.14 feet to a point, thence N 41 degrees 14 '41" W through said la 
distant 621.30 feet to a point, thence N 42 degrees 48*48" W through land of Bedell and Diamond Crystal 
Salt Company distant 972.73 feet to a point, thence S 66 degrees 09'29" W through land of Bedell and 
Diamond Crystal Salt Company distant 694.12 feet to a point, thence N 36 degrees 34'31" W through land 
of Bedell distant 102.26 feet to a point, thence N 53 degrees 25'29" E by the sideline of Floradale Ave 
distant 20.00 feet to a point, thence S 36 degrees 34' 31" E through land of Bedell distant 86.28 feet t 
a point, thence N 66 degrees 09' 29" E through land of Bedell and Diamond Crystal Salt Company distant 
692.41 feet to a point, thence S 42 degrees 48'48" E through land of Bedell and Diamond Crystal Salt 
Company distant 987.27 feet to a point, thence S 41 degrees 14'41" E through land of Bedell distant 62C 
70 feet to a point, thence S 46 degrees 17'39" E through land of Bedell distant 279.86 feet to a point, 
thence S 42 degrees 48 '48" E through land of Bedell distant 637.82 feet to the point of beginning; be- 
ginning at a point in the northerly sideline of Burlington Avenue said point being westerly and distant. 
89.46 feet from the easterly terminous of a curve of 331.63 feet radius, thence bearing to the right wll 
a curve of 331.63 feet radius by said sideline distant 20.47 feet to a point, thence N 37 degrees 55' 2C 
W through land of Bennett and Sweetheart Plastics Inc. distant 796.16 feet to a point, thence N 16 degr 
20'00" W through land of Sweetheart Plastics Inc., Cedar Street and Hillcrest Street distant 411.29 fee 
to a point, thence N 23 degrees 27*07" W through land of Sweetheart Plastics Inc. distant 390.68 feet t 
a point, thence N 31 degrees 23*04" W through land of Sweetheart Plastics Inc. and Water Street distant 
730.68 feet to a point, thence N 15 degrees 46*00" W through land of Sweetheart Plastics Inc. and Birkl 
distant 354.04 feet to a point, thence N 19 degrees 36*50" W through land of Birkle and Shawsheen Avenu 
distant 307.92 feet to a point, thence N 86 degrees 02*43" E by Shawsheen Avenue distant 20.77 feet to 
point, thence S 19 degrees 36*50" E through Shawsheen Avenue and land of Birkle distant 302.99 feet to 
point, thence S 15 degrees 46*00" E through land of Birkle and Sweetheart Plastics Inc. distant 351.96 
feet to a point, thence S 31 degrees 23*04" E through land of Sweetheart Plastics Inc. distant 729.32 
feet to a point, thence S 23 degrees 27*07" E through said land distant 393.32 feet to a point, thence 
16 degrees 20*00" E through land of Sweetheart Plastics Inc. and Cedar Street distant 408.72 feet to a 
point, thence S 37 degrees 55*20" E through land of Sweetheart Plastics Inc. distant 788.02 feet to the 
point of beginning; beginning at a point in the northerly sideline of Shawsheen Avenue said point being 
easterly and distant 15.44 feet from a property corner, thence N 25 degrees 14*00" E through land of 
Gagnon distant 150.42 feet to a point, thence N 44 degrees 56*00" W through land of Gagnon, Wilson, 
D*Amelio and Hupper distant 468.20 feet to a point, thence N 42 degrees 16*00" W through land of Hupper 
Caiazzo and York distant 400.23 feet to a point, thence N 48 degrees 07*00" W through land of York and 
Morris distant 289.05 feet to a point, thence N 53 degrees 06*00" W through land of Morris distant 200. 
feet to a point, thence N 44 degrees 56*00" W through said land distant 26.06 feet to a point, thence N 
38 degrees 13*50" E by the southerly sideline of Bridge Lane distant 20.14 feet to a point, thence S 44 
degrees 56*00" E through land of Morris distant 27.03 feet to a point, thence S 53 degrees 06*00" E 
through said land distant 199.72 feet to a point, thence S 48 degrees 07*00" E through land of Morris a 
York distant 290.95 feet to a point, thence S 42 degrees 16*00" E through land of York, Caiazzo and Hup 
distant 400.28 feet to a point, thence S 44 degrees 56*00" E through land of Hupper, D*Amelio, Wilson a 
Gagnon distant 481.79 feet to a point, thence S 25 degrees 14*00" W through land of Gagnon distant 163. 
feet to a point, thence N 66 degrees 44*48" W by the northerly sideline of Shawsheen Avenue distant 20. 
feet to the point of beginning; beginning at a point in the northerly sideline of Bridge Lane, said poi 
being easterly and distant 7.03 feet from an angle point, thence N 44 degrees 56'00" W through land of 
Sperry distant 332.26 feet to a point, thence N 48 degrees 41*00" W through said land distant 279.99 fe 
to a point, thence N 45 degrees 00*00" W through said land 11.02 feet to a point, thence N 53 degrees 5 
31" E by the southerly sideline of Richmond Street distant 5.18 feet to a point, thence N 57 degrees 57 
13" E by said sideline distant 15.28 feet to a point, thence S 45 degrees 00*00" E through land of Sper 
distant 6.15 feet to a point, thence S 48 degrees 41*00" E through said 280.01 feet to a point, thence 
44 degrees 56*00" E through said land distant 330.35 feet to a point, thence S 37 degrees 46*38" W by t 
northerly sideline of Bridge Lane distant 20.16 feet to the point of beginning; beginning at a point in 
the northerly sideline of Richmond Street said point being easterly and distant 1.36 feet from an angle 
point, thence N 45 degrees 00*00" W through land of Sperry distant 14.13 feet to a point, thence N 49 
degrees 09*00" W through said land distant 300.29 feet to a point, thence N 41 degrees 44*00" W through 
said land distant 270.25 feet to a point, thence N 46 degrees 18*00" W through said land distant 353.46 
feet to a point, thence N 42 degrees 54*08" E through said land distant 28.05 feet to a point, thence S 
47 degrees 05*52" E by the westerly sideline of land of the B & M Railroad distant 20.00 feet to a poin 
thence S 42 degrees 54*08" W through land of Sperry distant 8.33 feet to a point, thence S 46 degrees 1 
00" E through said land distant 334.53 feet to a point, thence S 41 degrees 44*00" E through said land 
distant 269.75 feet to a point, thence S 49 degrees 09*00" E through said land distant 299.71 feet to a 
point, thence S 45 degrees 00*00" E through said land 19.45 feet to a point, thence S 57 degrees 57*13*' 
W by the northerly sideline of Richmond Street distant 20.52 feet to the point of beginning; beginning 
at a point in the westerly sideline of land of the B & M Railroad, said point being westerly and distan 



98 



ARTICLE 19. (continued) 

39.00 feet from railroad baseline station 865 + 34.44, thence N 42 degrees 54'08" E distant 72.00 feet to 
a point, thence S 47 degrees 05'52" E distant 20.00 feet by the easterly sideline of the B & M Railroad 
to a point, thence S 42 degrees 54'08" W distant 72.00 feet to a point, thence N 47 degrees 05'52" W 
distant 20.00 feet by the westerly sideline of land of the B & M Railroad to the point of beginning; 
beginning at a point in the easterly sideline of land of the B & M Railroad, said point being at a pro- 
perty corner, thence N 42 degrees 54*08" E by the northerly sideline of land of McNeil and Brand Avenue 
distant 170.00 feet to a point, thence S 47 degrees 05' 52" E through Brand Avenue distant 69.50 feet to 
a point, thence S 42 degrees 54*08" W through Brand Avenue distant 40.00 feet to a point, thence N 47 
degrees 05*52" W through Brand Avenue distant 44.50 feet to a point, thence S 42 degrees 54*08" W by 
the southerly sideline of land of McNeil distant 130.00 feet to a point, thence N 47 degrees 05*52" W 
by the easterly sideline of land of the B & M Railroad distant 25.00 feet to the point of beginning, 
substantially as shown on a plan entitled, "Easement Plan of land in Wilmington, Mass., Scale 1" = 40', 
December 19, 1975, Whitman & Howard Inc., Engineers and Architects, 89 Broad Street, Boston, Mass.," 
with each easement on each parcel of land containing an area as shown on said plan, together with tem- 
porary construction easements substantially as shown on said plan, a copy of which is on file in the 
I office of the Town Engineer; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommended approval. 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Water and Sewer Commissioners to acquire any 
fee, easement, or other interest together with temporary construction easements by eminent domain, purchase, 
,gift, or otherwise necessary to effect the improvements to the Town sewerage system voted under Article 12 
of the Special Town Meeting of June 23, 1975, said easements being described as follows: Here the Moderator 
stopped further reading to ask Mr. Morris if the Article and Motion description were exactly the same. The 
answer was yes. Further reading of the description in Article 19 was suspended. Mr. Morris continued: . . . 
"and that the funds required be appropriated from funds available in Account 1156, entitled Silver Lake 
Sewer System for the pajment of any expenses and damages which may be incurred." 

Finance Committee recommended approval. Much discussion followed. Standing vote: Yes 102 No 33. Motion 
carries . 



ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to acquire land for con- 
servation purposes as authorized by Chapter 40, Section 8C of the Massachusetts General Laws said land to be 
managed by the Conservation Commission; and to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain or 
receive as a gift the certain parcels of land bound and described as follows: 

Beginning at a point in the easterly sideline of the 1908 County Layout of Woburn Street, said point 
being northerly and distant 12.72 feet from the northerly terminous of a curve of 459.24 feet radius, 
thence bounded westerly by said sideline of Woburn Street 69.64 feet, northerly by land of Serine 200.00 
feet, westerly by land of Serino, Bodenstein, Meegan, Centrella and Place 330.11 feet, 42.68 feet, 96.57 
feet and 31 + - feet, northerly by the 1957 Layout No. 4615 of Concord Street 70+ feet, easterly by land 
of Blackburn 27+ feet and 75.00 feet, northerly by land of Blackburn, Moore and Bodenstein 242 + - feet, 
^ easterly by the 1957 Layout No. 4615 of Route 93, 167 + - feet and 433 + - feet, southerly, westerly and 

■ southerly by land of Butt 296 + - feet, 14.95 feet and 72.85 feet, westerly, southwesterly and southerly 

■ by land of Shepardson 64.79 feet, 145.50 feet and 160.20 feet being Lot A containing 5 acres and; be- 
' ginning at a point in the easterly sideline of Woburn Street, said point being northerly and distant 

442.41 feet from the northerly terminous of a curve of 515.16 feet radius, thence bounded northerly and 

•westerly by land of Butt 476.81 feet, 319.33 feet and 24 + - feet; northerly and northeasterly by the 
1957 Layout No. 4615 of Route 93, 12 + - feet, 141.46 feet and 177 + - feet, southeasterly, easterly 
and Northerly by land of Goldman 330 + - feet, 843 + - feet and 528 + - feet, easterly by said Layout 
of Route 93, 320 + feet, southerly by the Ipswich River and land of D'Urso 2070+ feet and 260+ feet. 
Westerly by said Layout of Woburn Street 227.23 feet and 442.41 feet being Lot B containing 22.7 acres, 
all as shown on a plan entitled, "Plan of Land Woburn Street and Concord Street, Wilmington, Mass., 
Scale 1" = 100*, January 5, 1976, Robert L. Higgins, Town Engineer" a copy of which is on file in the 
office of the Town Engineer; and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation 
or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise; and to authorize the Conservation Com- 
mission to apply for assistance from the State and Federal governments; or do anything in relation 
thereto. Finance Committee recommended disapproval. 

Motion by Mr, James Miceli: "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$110,000 to acquire land for conservation purposes as authorized by Chapter 40 Section 8C of the Massachusetts 
General Laws said land to be managed by the Conservation Commission; and to authorize the Selectmen to pur- 
chase, take by eminent domain or receive as a gift the certain parcels of land bound and described as follows:" 
Mr. Callan asked if the motion follows the description in the Article20 above. Mr. Miceli said yes it does. 
Mr. Callan said we will dispense with further reading of the description and to authorize the Conservation 

99 

I 



ARTICLE 20. (continued) 

Connnission to apply for assistance from the State and Federal governments," Vote taken by voice. Motion 
fails unanimously. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington by deleting 

Section III-l.A.9.b. and substitute the following: 

"Section III-l.A.9.b Non-commercial keeping of animals, livestock, and poultry for personal or householc 
use, subject to regulations of the Board of Health; provided the same shall not be injurious, noxious, 
offensive or detrimental to a residential neighborhood. A "kennel" being one pack or collection of dogi 
on a single premises, whether maintained for breeding, boarding, sale, training, hunting or other purpos 
and including any shop where dogs are on sale, and also including every pack or collection of more than 
two dogs, three months old or over owned or kept by a person on a single premises irrespective of the 
purpose for which they are maintained are specifically not permitted;" or do anything in relation theret 
Finance Committee recommended approval. 

Motion by Mr. George W. Boylen, Jr.: "I move we pass over Article 21 and take no action." Planning Board 
recommended disapproval of this Article. Vote taken by voice and the Moderator declared the "ayes" have it 
unanimous ly . 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington by deleting Section 32. 3A from Chapter V and substituting therefor the following: 

Exemptions. Sections 32. 3. A. No permit shall be required for the removal of earth from an individual 
parcel where necessary in the construction of a building being built in accordance with a building permi 
issued by the proper Town authority and where the earth removal does not exceed 450 cubic yards; or do 
anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. James F. Banda: "I move that the Town vote to amend the Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of 
the Town of Wilmington by deleting Section 32. 3. A from Chapter V and substituting therefor the following: 
Exemptions. Sections 32. 3. A. No permit shall be required for the removal of earth from an individual 
parcel where necessary in the construction of a building being built in accordance with a building perml, 
issued by the proper Town authority and where the earth removal does not exceed 450 cubic yards." The 
Finance Committee recommended approval. The Planning Board recommended approval. Vote taken by voice 
and the Moderator declared the "ayes" have it. So voted. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington by deleting 
Section III-l-B-5; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. William G. Hooper, Jr.: "I move that the Town vote to postpone indefinitely Article 23." 
The Planning Board recommended disapproval in the words of the motion. Voted to postpone indefinitely 
Article 23. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington by adding to 

Section VI-2 the following: 

In the event that fire or other disaster renders a single family dwelling uninhabitable, if so certified 
by the Building Inspector to be uninhabitable, the temporary use of a house trailer shall be permitted 
as a substitute dwelling for a period not to exceed nine months. The fine for any occupancy of said 
house trailer beyond said nine months as provided for under this section will be $20.00 for each day; or 
do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by Mr. William G. Hooper, Jr.: "I move that the Town vote to postpone indefinitely Article 24." The 
Planning Board recommended disapproval in the words of the motion. Voted to postpone indefinitely Article V- 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington by adding to 
Section II, paragraph 17, Home Occupation, the following: 

Subsection (3) a home occupation excludes that use commonly described as a beauty shop; or do anything ir 

relation thereto. 

The Planning Board recommended disapproval in the words of the motion. 

Motion by Mr. Larz Nielson: "I move to pass over Article 25 and take no action." So voted. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to waive the inspection and certification fees as found in Section 
108.15, Table 1-1 of the State Building Code, as it pertains to municipally owned buildings and places of 
worship, or do anything in relation thereto. 



100 



ARTICLE 26. (continued) 

Motion by Mr. Morris: "I move that the Town vote to waive the inspection and certification fees as found in 
Section 108.15, Table 1-1 of the State Building Code, and as amended, as it pertains to municipally owned 
buildings and places of worship." 

Finance Committee recommended approval. Motion voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to acquire land for con- 
servation purposes as authorized by Chapter 40, Section 8C of the Massachusetts General Laws said land to be 
managed by the Conservation Commission; and to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain, 
receive as a gift, or execute an option for a certain parcel of land bound and described as follows: 

Beginning at a point in the westerly sideline of Wildwood Street, said point being the southeasterly 
corner of said premises, thence bounded southerly by land of Murray, Mucci and Senpek Realty Corporation 
382+ feet; westerly by land of the Town of Wilmington known as Central Park 441+ feet; southwesterly and 
southeasterly by land of McGrane and Pettingill 650+ feet and 510+ feet; westerly, northerly, westerly, 
southerly and westerly by land known as Narrow Guage Park 282+ feet, 306+ feet, 150+ feet, 391+ feet and 
168+ feet, westerly by land of Fenton 381+ feet, northerly by land of Luongo 130+ feet, northerly by 
land of Pilla 756+ feet, northeasterly by Wildwood Street 1343+ feet, southeasterly and northeasterly 
by land of Reading Municipal Light and Power Board 100+ feet and 100+ feet. Northeasterly and north- 
westerly by land of Albert C. Brun 100+ feet and 100+ feet, northeasterly by Wildwood Street 425+ feet 
feet being Lot 104 containing 19 acres, all as shown on a plan entitled, "Compiled Plan of Land on 
Wildwood Street, Wilmington, Mass., Scale 1" = 100', January 5, 1976, Robert L. Higgins, Town Engineer" 
a copy of which is on file in the office of the Town Engineer; and to determine how an appropriation 
shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise; 
and to authorize the Conservation Commission to apply for assistance from the State and Federal govern- 
ments; or do anything in relation thereto. Request of the Conservation Commission. Recommended ap- 
proval $8,000 ($4,000 expected to be reimbursed from self-help funds) 

'Motion (corrected to read - see below) by Mr. Joseph Kulig, of the Conservation Commission: "I move that the 
rown vote to raise and appropriate a sum of $8,000 to acquire land for conservation purposes as authorized by 
Chapter 40, Section 8C of the Massachusetts General Laws said land to be managed by the Conservation Com- 
nission; and to authorize the Selectmen to purchase a certain parcel of land bounded and described as follows: 
Beginning at a point in the westerly sideline of Wildwood Street, said point being the southeasterly 
corner of said premises, thence bounded southerly by land of Murray, Mucci and Senpeck Realty Corporation 
382+ feet; westerly by land of the Town of Wilmington known as Central Park 441+ feet; southwesterly and 
southeasterly by land of McGrane and Pettingill 650+ feet and 540+ feet ; westerly, northerly, westerly, 
southerly and westerly by land known as Narrow Guage Park 283+ feet, 306+ feet, 150+ feet, 405f feet 
and 168+ feet, westerly by land of Fenton 381+ feet. Northerly by land of Luongo 130+ feet, northerly by 
land of Pilla 756+ feet, northeasterly by Wildwood Street 975+ feet southeasterly and northeasterly by 
land of Reading Municipal Light and Power Board 100+ feet and 100+ feet, northeasterly and northwesterly 
by land of Albert C. Brun 100+ feet, and 100+ feet, Northeasterly by Wildwood Street 308+ feet being 
Lot 104 containing 19 acres, all as shown on a plan entitled, "Compiled Plan of Land on Wildwood Street, 
Wilmington, Mass., Scale 1" = 100', January 5, 1976, Robert L. Higgins, Town Engineer" a copy of which 
is on file in the office of the Town Engineer; and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, 
whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise; and to authorize 
the Conservation Commission to apply for assistance from the State and Federal governments." 

Finance Committee recommended approval of $8,000 ($4,000 expected to be reimbursed from Self-Help funds). 
k short discussion followed. The Moderator read the motion saying "and to raise by taxation". The Planning 
Board reported approval of this Article. Voice vote doubted. Standing vote: Yes 86 - No 37. So voted. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of 
the Town of Wilmington by adding a new Section to Chapter 3; namely. Section 25 as follows: 

"The Selectmen shall appoint a Board of Appeals under the provisions of Chapter 41, Section 81Z of the 
■ General Laws for the purpose of hearing and acting upon appeals under the provisions of Chapter 41, 
B Section 81E through 81H, inclusive. Official Map, or do anything in relation thereto," 

Finance Committee recommended approval. The Planning Board reported disapproval. 

jtotion by A. Daniel Gillis: "I move that we pass over Article 28 and take no action thereon." The "ayes" 
lave it. So voted. 

\RTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to David Henry Dec a 



101 



ARTICLE 29. (continued) 

certain parcel of Town owned land shown as Parcel 109 on Assessors Map 67 containing about 45,000 feet, sub- 
ject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and further to set the minimum amount to 
be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. (Petition of David Henry Dec). Finance 
Committee recommended disapproval. The Planning Board reported disapproval. 

Motion by Mr. Gillis: "I move that we pass over Article 29 and take no action." The "ayes" have it. So 
voted . 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to petition the State Legisla- 
ture to authorize that Arthur J. Hall be allowed to take the Civil Service Police entrance examination for 
the position of patrolman in the Wilmington Police Department notwithstanding that he is more than thirty- 
two years old. (Petition of Ralph E. Tarricone and others). 

Motion by Mr. A. Daniel Gillis, Chairman, Selectmen: "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to petition the State Legislature to authorize that Arthur J. Hall be allowed to take the Civil 
Service Police entrance examination for the position of patrolman in the Wilmington Police Department not- 
withstanding that he is more than thirty-two years old." Finance Committee recommended approval. 

Motion taken by voice. The Moderator declared the "ayes" have it. So voted. 

Mrs. Sullivan moved to reconsider Article 14. Mr. Caira rose to a point of order, he questioned a quorum. 
A count of the meeting showed only 132 voters present. No quorum... to reconsider disallowed. 

There being no further business to come before the meeting, this meeting adjourned at 10:30 p.m. 

Number of voters checked in: Afternoon 275 

Evening 174 

ARTICLES VOTED BY TAXATION $12,209,140 
ARTICLES VOTED BY BORROWING 123,600 
TOTAL $12,332,740 

TOTAL TO BE TRANSFERRED $ 1,151,404 

A true copy: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Attest: Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 

PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY - WILMINGTON MASSACHUSETTS 
HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM, CHURCH STREET - MARCH 2, 1976 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of sai 
Town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to meet in the High School Gjrmnasium, Church Street, Tuesday, the 
second day of March 1976 at ten o'clock a.m. for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the Election of Candidates of Political Parties for the 
following offices: Presidential preference; District Members of State Committee (one man and one woman) for 
each Political Party for the Fifth Senatorial District; (35) Members of the Democratic Town Committee; (35) 
Members of the Republican Town Committee; (0) Members of the American Town Committee. 

The polls will be open from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said meetinj 

Given under our hands this 9th day of February A. D. 1976. Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington: 

s/A. Daniel Gillis, Chairman 

s /James R. Miceli 

s/Aldo Caira 

s/George W. Boylen, Jr. 

s /James F. Banda 



102 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY (continued) 

At 9:45 a.m. on March 2, 1976, the Town Clerk read the Town Warrant. All the machines in the (6) precincts 
were ready and at 10:00 a.m. the Town Clerk declared the polls opened. 

All the totals from the 25 voting machines plus the absentee ballots were recorded and declaration thereof 
made, as by law is directed, and were for the following, namely: 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY (cont.) 



Presidential Preference 



Robert L. Kelleher 


4 


Fred F. Cain 


George C. Wallace 


341 


Christine Briand 


Ellen McCormack 


52 


A. Daniel Gillis 


Terry Sanford 





Christine L. Gardiner 


Lloyd Bentsen 


1 


Alice M. Hooper 


Fred R. Harris 


87 


John Brooks 


Milton J. Shapp 


54 


Francis A. Ottati 


Birch Bayh 


107 


Mary L. Cunningham 


Jimmy Carter 


522 


David I. Elf man 


R. Sargent Shriver 


94 


Ralph D. Peterson 


Henry M. Jackson 


434 


George W. Boylen, Jr. 


Morris K. Udall 


322 


John W. McCann 


No Preference 


33 


Rocco V. DePasquale 


Write-In: 




Dorothy H. Lane 


One name undecernable 


1 


Thomas W. Coates 


Reagan 


1 


Anthony Visconti 


Kennedy 


1 


Michael J. Bielecki 


Humphrey 


16 


Richard W. Cogan 


Wallace 


1 


Alice M. Chisholm 


Proxmire 


1 


Blanks 


Ford 


1 




Blanks 


27 






2100 


Total Democratic votes cast 



State Committee - 5th Middlesex District 
(Man) 



John F. 
Blanks 



Cogan, Jr. 



State Committee - 5th Middlesex District 
(Woman) 



Jean E. 
Blanks 



Rubens te in 



Town Committee 

James L. McLaughlin 
George W. Hooper 
Florence E. Borofsky 
Anna M. Visconti 
Madeline B. Higginbotham 
Simon Cutter 
Rose Marie Gatta 
Eleanor F. O'Keeffe 
Daniel E. O'Keeffe 
John Tsicouleas 
Delia K. Enos 
Peter Enos 

Lorenzo A. Zaccagnini 
James F. Banda 
John Leo Markey, Jr. 
Timothy J. Kane 



868 
1232 
2100 



583 
1517 
2100 



1160 
1277 
1086 
1206 
1123 
1218 
1122 
1157 
1126 
1051 
1134 
1163 
1106 
1372 
1176 
1124 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 

Presidential Preference 
Ronald W. Reagan 
Gerald R. Ford 
No Preference 
Write-In: 

One name undecernable 

Wallace 

Jackson 

Lecoures 

Englef ield 
Blanks 



State Committee 



5th Middlesex District 
(Man) 



Lawrence Braverroan 
Peter Dulchinos 
William H. Levison 
David J. McLachlan 
Blanks 



State Committee - 5th Middlesex District 
(Woman) 



Clara F. 
Paula K. 
Blanks 



Tubby 
Lewellen 



1463 
1101 
1424 
1173 
1186 
1203 
1159 
1137 
1083 
1082 
1299 
1083 
1223 
1070 
1076 
1136 
1053 
1110 
1165 
32673 
73500 

2100 



184 

250 
17 

1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
11 
468 



92 
55 
74 
83 
164 
468 



142 
145 
181 
468 



103 



PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY (cont.) 



REPUBLICAN PARTY (cont.) 



AMERICAN PARTY 



Town Committee 




Presidential Preference 


Lulu E . Sanborn 


292 


Write-in: 


Leota A. Sanborn 


285 


Wal lace 


Nancy M. Lancaster 


302 


No Preference 


Carl L. Noelcke, Jr. 


291 




William G. Hooper, Jr. 


346 




Jane Ann Holbrook 


318 


State Connnittee - 5th Middlesex District 


Lorraine Kitchener Jones 


300 


(Man) 


Ruth M. Kitchener 


320 


WIIIIhiq R. Nlmee 


James S . Fairweather 


300 




M. Flora Kasabuski 


299 


State Connnittee - 5th Middlesex District 


Louis A. Dindo 


281 


(Woman) 


Milton L. Bradford, Jr. 


290 


No Name Given 


Sandra P. Durling 


282 




Carol Anne Frost 


308 


Town Committee 


Patricia MacFeeley 


288 


No Names G iven 


Angus B. MacFeeley 


293 




Constance J. Phillips 


292 


Tnt'fll AmPTippn PflTtv votps cast 


Mildred R. Lanzillo 


279 




Donald Robert Garland 


299 




Albert H. Marfleet 


299 




Catherine A. Marfleet 


298 




i id y iLdu J.C 


282 




William H. Russell 


303 




Doris V. Russell 


295 




Roland I. Wood 


324 




Barbara M. Dayton 


315 




William P. Dayton 


312 




Carrie L. Lewis 


279 




Phyllis T. Ritchie 


288 




Richard W. Thackeray 


299 




Adeline E. Bacon 


305 




Bernard R, Bacon 


309 




John R. Sanborn 


289 




Madelon C. Slater 


297 




Dorothy A. Halliday 


278 




Blanks 


5943 
16380 




Total Republican votes cast 


468 





After the declaration of the vote the meeting adjourned at 10:30 p.m. 

Attest: (Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - July 29, 1976 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



The Moderator, Mr. John M. Callan called the meeting to order at 8:16 p.m. and after addressing a few brief 
remarks to the meeting read the warrant as follows: 

To the Constable of the Town of Wilmington, Massachusetts: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed by the By-Laws of 
said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote in Town 
affairs to meet and assemble at the Herbert C. Barrows Auditorium, Church Street, Wilmington, the 29th of 
July, 1976 at eight o'clock p.m. to consider and act on the following Article: 



104 



ITICLE 1. "We the permanent resident and taxpayers of Wilmington, Massachusetts hereby submit the following 
jtition: It is our desire that the dump now operated by Clarence Spinazola remain open as it has for the 
ist 15 years. We are not and will not be satisfied with the proposed contract between the Town of Wilmington 
id Brown and Ferris Industries which if allowed, will go into effect July 1, 1976. We demand a Special Town 
;eting in order that this matter can be fully and openly discussed." By Petition. 

ireof fail not and make due return of this Warrant, or a certified copy thereof with your doings thereon, to 
le Town Clerk, as soon as may be and before said meeting. 

Lven under our hands and seal of said Town this 19th day of July, A.D. , One Thousand Nine Hundred and 
iventy-Six. 

Board of Selectmen 
s /James P. Banda 
s/A. Daniel Gillis 
s/James R. Miceli 

le Moderator asked that the Town Clerk note in her minutes that the Warrant was properly served and posted, 
lis is so noted. 

)tion under the above Article 1 by Mr. Kevin T. Berrigan: "I move that it be recommended to the Selectmen 
lat the alleged contract between BFI and the Town of Wilmington be declared null and void, that the entire 
)lid waste disposal issue be reconsidered, and that arrangements be made to reopen the dump in Wilmington 
itil such time that the problem be resolved." * 



Lnance Committee recommended disapproval. 



iter almost two hours of discussion, the Moderator called for a standing vote. Tellers count as follows: 
iS 52 - No 86. Moderator declared motion failed for lack of a majority vote. 



ition to adjourn came at 10:37 p.m. So voted. 



lere were 265 voters checked in at this meeting. 

:test: (Mrs.) Margaret A. Wagstaff 

Asst. Town Clerk 



I 



STATE PRIMARY - WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM, CHURCH STREET - September 14, 1976 



» either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

lEETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
lid Town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to meet in the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, 
.Imington, Massachusetts on Tuesday, the fourtheenth day of September 1976 at ten o'clock a.m. for the 
allowing purposes: 

bring in their votes to the Primairy Officers for the Nomination of Candidates of Political Parties for the 
illowing offices: 

Senator in Congress For this Commonwealth 

Representative in Congress For this Fifth Congressional District 

Councillor For this Third Councillor District 

Senator For this Fifth Senatorial District 

Representative in General Court, Middlesex For this 36th Representative District 

Clerk of Courts For Middlesex County 

Register of Deeds For Middlesex Northern District 

County Commissioners For Middlesex County 

e polls will be open from ten o'clock a.m. to eight o'clock, p.m. 

ireof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said meeting. 



105 



STATE PRIMARY (continued) 

Given under our hands this first day of September A.D. 1976, 
Attest: 



Selectmen of Wilmington 
s/ George W. Boylen, Jr., Chairman 
James R. Miceli 
James F. Banda 



At 9:45 a.m. on September 14, 1976 in the High School Gymnasium the Town Clerk read the Town Warrant. All 
the six (6) precincts were ready and at 10:00 a.m. the Town Clerk declared the polls open. 

All the totals from the twenty-five machines plus the absentee ballots were recorded and declaration thereof 
made, as by law is directed and were for the following: 

AMERICAN PARTY - paper ballots 

The Town Clerk had ballot box machines in each of the six precincts, and voting booths ready. No voter 
asked for an American ballot. 

There were no candidates names printed on the American Ballot for the Town of Wilmington. 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



Senator in Congress 
Edward M. Kennedy 
Robert Emmet Dinsmore 
Frederick C. Langone 
Bernard P. Shannon 
Blanks 



Congressman - 5th District 
Paul E. Tsongas 
Blanks 



Councillor - 3rd District 
Herbert L. Connolly 
Blanks 



Senator - 5th Middlesex District 
John J. Leary 
Blanks 



Representative in General Court 

36th Middlesex District 

Fred F. Cain 
Blanks 



Clerk of Courts - Middlesex County 
Edward J. Sullivan 
Blanks 



Register of Deeds - Middlesex 

Northern District 

Edward J. Early, Jr. 
Walter J. Flynn 
Blanks 



768 
212 
115 
9 

9 

1113 



854 
259 
1113 



576 
537 
1113 



630 
483 
1113 



853 
260 
1113 



627 
486 
1113 



697 
240 
176 
1113 



Senator in Congress 
Michael S. Robertson 
Blanks 



Congressman - 5th District 
Roger P. Durkin 
Blanks 



Councillor - 3rd District 



No Candidate 



Senator - 5th Middlesex District 



Ronald C. MacKenzie 
Blanks 



Representative in General Court 

36th Middlesex District 

No Candidate 



Clerk of Courts - Middlesex County 
Joan R. Needleman 
Blanks 



Register of Deeds - Middlesex 

Northern District 

No Candidate 



IK 

_Ji 
14i 



117 

2 

14: 



9J 
44 
142 



106 



STATE PRIMARY (cont.) 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 
:ounty Commissioner - Middlesex County 



Michael E. McLaughlin 


657 


S. Lester Ralph 


394 


Joyce Morrissey Beatty 


134 


Richard Robert Caples 


103 


Thomas F. Cough 1 in 


290 


Bernard J, Hennessy 


99 


Blanks 


549 




2226 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 

County Commissioner - Middlesex County 
Carl J. Cincotta 
Blanks 



108 
34 
142 



Che Board of Registrars were present and as voters left the polls they were allowed to fill out a party 
hange card if they so desired. 

\fter the declaration of the vote the meeting was adjourned at 9:30 p.m. 

Attest: (Mrs.)Esther L. Russell 

Town Clerk 

L STATE ELECTION - WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

I HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM, CHURCH STREET - November 2, 1976 

Do either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants of 
said Town who are qualified to vote in elections to meet at the polling place listed below on Tuesday, the 
Jecond day of November 1976 at six o'clock a.m. for the following purposes: To bring in^ their votes to the 
Jlection Officers for the Election of Candidates for the following offices: Electors of President and Vice 
?resident; (1) Senator in Congress; (1) Congressman; (1) Councillor; (1) Senator in General Court (1) 
tepresentative in General Court; (1) Clerk of Courts; (1) Register of Deeds; (2) County Commissioners and 
:en (10) questions which will be outlined in the election results. 

rhe polls to be open at 6:00 a.m. and to close at 8:00 p.m. 

iereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
nee ting. 

liven under our hands this 26th day of October A.D. 1976. Selectmen of Wilmington 

s /James R. Miceli 
Aldo Caira 
A. Daniel Gillis 
James F. Banda 

^he Town Clerk, Esther L. Russell, read the above Warrant at 5:45 a.m. The polls were opened at 6:00 a.m. 
fhe polls closed at 8:00 p.m. It was 9:15 p.m. before the last voter cast his vote. 

iTiere were 7,466 ballots cast. 185 ballots being absentee. 81.6% voters cast their ballots. Total voters 
IS of October 5, 1976 (9134). 

lie results of this election were read to the public at 12:45 a.m. 

ill of the totals from the twenty-five (25) machines plus the absentee ballots were recorded and declaration 
:hereof made, as by law is directed, and were for the following: 



XECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT 
1 Anderson and Shackelford - American 

Camejo and Reid - Socialist Workers Party 
Carter and Mondale, Democratic 
Ford and Dole, Republican 
LaRouche, Jr. and Evans, U. S. Labor 



VOTE 

21 
9 

4164 
2997 
3 



107 



STATE ELECTION (cont.) 

ELECTORS OF PRESIDENT AND VICE PRESIDENT (cont.) 
McCarthy and Stouffer, Independent 
Others 
Blanks 

SENATOR IN CONGRESS 

Edward M. Kennedy, Democratic 

Michael S. Robertson, Republican 

Carol Henderson Evans, Socialist Workers Party 

H. Graham Lowry, U. S. Labor 

Blanks 

CONGRESSMAN - Fifth District 

Paul E. Tsongas, Democratic 
Roger P. Durkin, Republican 
Blanks 

COUNCILLOR - Third District 

Herbert L. Connolly, Democratic 
Blanks 

SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT - Fifth Middlesex District 
Ronald C. MacKenzie, Republican 
John J. Leary, Democratic 
Blanks 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT - Thirty-sixth Middlesex District 
Fred F. Cain, Democratic 
Blanks 

CLERK OF COURTS - Middlesex County 

Edward J. Sullivan, Democratic 
Joan R. Needleman, Republican 
Blanks 

REGISTER OF DEEDS - Middlesex Northern District 
Edward J. Early, Jr., Democratic 
Martin F. Delmore, Independent 
Blanks 

COUNTY CCMMISSIONER - Middlesex County 
S. Lester Ralph, Democratic 
Carl J. Cincotta, Republican 
Michael E. McLaughlin, Democratic 
Blanks 

Question #1 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution summarized bel 
which was approved by the General Court in joint sessions of the House of Representatives 
Senate on August 15, 1973, by a vote of 261-0, and on May 14, 1975, by a vote of 217-55? 



108 



TATE ELECTION (cont.) 

Question #1 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution (cont. ) 



ummary 

he proposed amendment would provide that equality under the law may not be denied or abridged 
n the basis of sex, race, color, creed or national origin. This amendment adds one sentence to 
rticle I of Part of the First of the Constitution which now contains a general statement of in- 
ividual rights, including the right to enjoy and defend life and liberty and the right to acquire 
,nd protect property. 



3722 
3277 
467 
7466 

uestion #2 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution summarized below, 
hich was approved by the General Court in joint sessions of the House of Representatives and 
enate on August 15, 1973, by a vote of 199-66, and on May 7, 1975, by a vote of 228-41? 



Yes 
No 

Blanks 



ummary 

he proposed amendment would authorize the Legislature to substitute for the present system of 
lat or uniform personal income tax rates a system of rates graduated according to the total 
mount of income received. The Legislature would also be authorized to provide for reasonable 
xemptions, deductions, credits, and abatements and could base Massachusetts income tax pro- 
is ions on provisions of Federal income tax law. 



Yes 1492 
No 5461 
Blanks 513 

7466 

uestion #3 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution suimaarized below, 
hich was approved by the General Court in joint sessions of the House of Representatives and 
enate on August 15, 1973 by a vote of 259-0 and on May 12, 1976, by a vote of 262-1? 



ummary 

he proposed amendment would authorize the Legislature to provide for absentee voting by persons 
ho hold religious beliefs in conflict with the act of voting on the day on which any election 
s to be held. 



3652 
3310 
504 
7466 

Q uestion #4 - Law Proposed by an Initiative Petition 

j Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was disapproved by the House of 

Representatives on May 5, 1975, by a vote of 179-46, and on which no vote was taken by the 
enate before May 7, 1975? 



Yes 
No 

Blanks 



ummary 

ECTION 1 of the act inserts a new chapter 164B into the General Laws and establishes a Massachusetts 
jower Authority, a body corporate and politic with seven members appointed by the Governor to staggered 
ix year terms. The Authority is to establish and operate a bulk power supply system to supply wholesale 
lectric power to utilities throughout the Commonwealth. The primary purpose of the Authority is to 
apply the Commonwealth with power with the minimtim adverse impact on the environment. The Authority is 
'Iso authorized to engage in research and development of new sources of power, new siting techniques, 
ad methods of environmental protection. 

a carrying out its responsibilities, the Authority is authorized to adopt by-laws; adopt an official 
Jal; maintain offices; sue and be sued; construct or acquire facilities either within or without 
Dmmonwealth; issue revenue bonds and borrow money in anticipation of issuance of revenue bonds; acquire 
ial and personal property; employ professional, managerial and other employees deemed necessary and 



109 



Question #4 - Law Proposed by an Initiative Petition (continued) 



Summary (cont. ) 

and fix their compensation to be paid solely out of revenues of the Authority; appear before other governmen 
agencies; apply for and receive federal or other grants of funds; and enter into contracts and agreements. 

The Authority will build and operate all new generating and transmission facilities in the Commonwealth and 
has the option to purchase existing facilities through negotiations, condemnation, or eminent domain. After 
an initial two-year period, no other utility may construct a new facility unless the Authority certifies tha 
it lacks the capability to finance the facility and the facility would further the purpose of the act. 

The Authority will finance its activities by issuing revenue bonds. The bonds will be exempt from state 
taxation, but will not be backed by the full faith and credit of the Commonwealth. Power will be sold to 
other utilities by contract but no special discounts or bonuses to promote the increased use of power may be 
given. Public hearings are required on all major contracts. 

The Authority is required to develop a master, 20-year demand study and siting plan within 18 months of its 
incorporation, to be updated each succeeding year. Sites will be selected in accordance with the Electric 
Power Facilities Siting Council Act of 1973. The Governor and the community in which any facility is to be 
located must affirmatively approve the facility before it can be constructed. 

The Authority will be subject to all applicable federal and state environmental standards and must obtain 
all necessary federal and state permits and complete all necessary environmental impact statements. 

The Authority will be exempt from taxation but will make payments in lieu of taxes to cities and towns in an 
amount equal to the tax which would be paid if the Authority's real and personal property were owned by a 
private electric utility company. 

The Authority is forbidden from engaging in promotional or image advertising. The Authority has the authorit 
to bargain collectively with its employees and is subject to the provisions of Chapter 150 of the General 
Laws, which governs the conciliation and arbitration of industrial disputes. Employees of the Authority are 
not subject to the civil service law and rules. Employees of utilities displaced by the activities of the 
Authority have first preference in employment by the Authority. 

SECTION 2. of the act amends section 43 of Chapter 164 of the General Laws to provide that if a city or towr 
votes, in accordance with the provision of Chapter 164, to establish a municipal utility and acquire the 
facilities of the utility currently serving the community, and the utility refuses to sell its property to 
the city or town, that the Department of Public Utilities will establish a fair price for the facilities, and 
the utility will be required to accept the price determined by the department and tender the deed for the 
facilities to the city or town. 



Yes 
No 

Blanks 



96f 

504C: 

1461 1 
7466 



Question #5 - Law Proposed by Initiative Petition (This question appeared as question 5(a) in the 

Information For Voters booklet.) 
Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was disapproved by the House of Representatives 
on May 3, 1976, by a vote of 197-35, and on which no vote was taken by the Senate before May 5, 1976? 

Summary 

The proposed legislation would prohibit the possession, ownership, or sale of any weapon from which a shot 
or bullet can be discharged and which has a barrel length of less than sixteen inches. The prohibition would 
not apply to military personnel, law enforcement officers, federally licensed handgun manufacturers and 
wholesalers, common carriers in the ordinary course of transport, or to historical societies and museums. 
The act would not affect the possession of rifles, shotguns, and certain antiques and replicas. The proposal 
also does not change the existing statutory penalties for unlawful possession, ownership or sale of handguns, 
including provision imposing mandatory jail sentences. 

The proposal would permit owners of handguns to surrender their weapons to any law enforcement agency in the 
Commonwealth within six months of the effective date of the act without incurring criminal liability. Those 
surrendering handguns within that six months will be compensated at a rate to be determined by the 

110 



STATE ELECTION (cont.) 



Question #5 - Law Proposed by Initiative Petition (cont.) 
Summary (cont.) 

Commissioner of Public Safety. 

Yes 
No 

Blanks 

Question #6 - Law Proposed by an Initiative Petition 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was disapproved by the House of 
Representatives on May 3, 1976, by a vote of 146-85, and on which no vote was taken by the 
Senate before May 5, 1976? 

Summary 

Ihe proposed act would require every beverage container sold or offered for sale in the ConEnonwealth 
to have a refund value of at least five (5) cents, and would prohibit the sale of metal beverage 
containers with flip-tops. It would apply to containers for beer and other malt beverages and to 
soft drinks. It would not apply to containers for dairy products or natural fruit juices, nor to 
containers which are biodegradable. 

rhe act would authorize the Secretary of Environmental Affairs to certify containers as reusable 
or recyclable. It contains both enforcement and penalty provisions and would take effect on 
February 1, 1977. 

Yes 
No 

Blanks 

Question #7 - Law Proposed by an Initiative Petition 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which was disapproved by the House of 
Representatives on May 3, 1976, by a vote of 182-49, and on which no vote was taken by the Senate 
before May 5, 1976? 

Summary 

rhe proposed act would impose a general requirement that every electric utility company charge 
3 uniform rate per kilowatt hour of electricity. The proposed act would except from this 
general rule rates charged to other electric utility companies and to residential customers who 
leat their principle place of residence by electricity. The Act would also permit a different 
rate to be charged residential customers for the first three hundred (300) kilowatt hours they 
consume each month, and would authorize "peak load" pricing whereby a higher rate than the 
jniform rate per kilowatt hour may be charged during the periods of the day or seasons of the 
year when consumption of electricity is the greatest. The Act would authorize the Department 
3f Public Utilities to issue implementing rules and regulations and provides for enforcement. 

Yes 
No 

Blanks 

Question il'S - This Question is not Binding 

The following is a non-binding advisory question: "Shall the General Court enact 
legislation authorizing the construction of an oil refinery and a deep water port, subject to 
he approval of those communities directly affected and any reservations that the General 
]ourt may prescribed?" 



1820 
5158 
488 
7466 



3461 
3493 
512 
7466 



2088 
4806 
572 
7466 



Summary 

?he Legislature has placed this question on the ballot in order to determine whether the people 
favor of oppose the construction of an oil refinery and deep water port in Massachusetts. The 
rote on this question is not binding on the Legislature. The question deals with the general 
idvisability of such construction and is not a specific proposal for a facility. If a specific 
)roposal is made, it would be subject to approval by the communities directly affected and 



111 



STATE ELECTION (cont.) 



Question #8 - This Question is Not BlndinR (cont. ) 
Summary (cont . ) 

subject to any restrictions imposed by the Legislature. 

Yes 
No 

Blanks 

Question #9 - This Question is Not BindinR 

The following is a non-binding advisory question: "Shall retail stores including 
package liquor stores, so called, be allowed to open for business on Sunday?" 

Summary 

The Legislature has placed this question on the ballot in order to determine whether the people 
favor or oppose the Sunday opening of certain retail stores, including package liquor stores. As 
the law now stands, most retail and all package liquor stores must be closed on Sundays. The 
vote on this question is not binding on the Legislature. 

Yes 
No 

Blanks 

Question #10 

E. Shall licenses be granted in this city (or town) for the sale therein of alcoholic 
beverages by restaurants and function rooms having a seating capacity of not less than one hundred 
persons? In the Towns of Wellesley and Wilmington? 

Yes 
No 

Blanks 



4401 
2316 
749 
7466 



3813 
3039 
614 
7466 



3938 
2558 
970 
7466 



After the declaration of the vote the meeting adjourned at 12:50 a.m 
Attest 



(Mrs.) Esther L. Russell 
Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Massachusetts 




High School Marching Band 



112 



Town Accountant 



ANALYSIS OF CASI ACCOUNT 
JULY 1, 197$ to JUNE 30, 1976 



Balance as of July 1, 1975 

Add: Cash Receipts 7/1/75 to 6/30/76 

Deduct: Cash Expenditures 7/1/75 to 6/30/76 
Balance on Hand 6/30/76 



Tax Collections : 

Personal Property, Levy- 



Real Estate, Levy 



197U 
1975 
1976 
1973 
197ii 
1975 
1976 

Betterments Added to Taxes; 
Water Assessments, Levy 1973 

1975 
1976 

Street Assessments, Levy 1973 

1975 
1976 

Sewer Assessments, Levy 
Water Liens Added to Taxes; 

Levy 1973 
1975 
1976 

Sewer Liens Added To Taxes: 

Levy 1976 
Tax Titles & Possessions: 
Tax Titles 

Sale of Tax Possessions 

Sale of Redevelopment Land 
Pro -Forma Taxes 
Assessments Paid in Advance ; 

Water 

Street 

Unapportioned Betterments - Paid in Full 
Water 
Street 



ANALYSIS OF CASH RECEEVED 

112.10 
2,ii70.25 
295,637.07 
23,182.26 
32,329.22 
8ii,31i|.98 
8,l|21,778.1t2 



295.98 
337.18 

6.298.68 
1)49.55 
151 .30 

9,362.81 



302. it9 
78I .03 
19,110.18 



21,.ii50.l9 
760.30 
1i;1,U82.00 

1,608.06 

5,173.00 
10,598.56 

AMOUNTS BORROlfllED 



298,219.1+2 
5,561, 60i;.88 
6,931 .8U 



9,663.66 
9,06i4.8it 



20,193.70 
66.11 



163,692.1+9 
27.01 



It,l;82.20 



91+0,913.66 
29,779,1+65.30 
30, 720,37a o96 
28,59l+,212.0l+ 
2,126,166.92 



15,771.56 9,089.717.71 



Short Term Loans; 

Highway, Chapter 90 

Ten^). Loan, Antic. Bond Issue 
Long Term Loans; 

Acquired Land - Town Forest 



93,836.00 
100,000.00 

169,000.00 



362,836.00 



113 



(mmS AMD GIFTS 



Federal Aid ; 
Schools: 



Federal Employment Act #PL87U 


i;1,ii32.00 


NatxonaJ- Uelense Education #PLo5-ooi4. 




Reading Skills 


82,879.86 


Head Start 


1,539.00 


Btireau of Library Extensions 


8,907.25 


Public Grants: 




State Aid to Highways 


i;6,380.33 


Highway Fund, Chp. 82^ 


ii3, 232 .00 


State Aid to Public Libraries 


6,i;13.25 


In Service Leadership Training 


100.00 


Veterans' Services 


I5,55i;.69 




REVOLVING FUNDS 


School Liinch Program: 




State Reimbursements 


158,651 .82 


Program Receipts 


2l6,11i;.85 



Hi^ School Athletic Association 
Recreation Account 
Outside Detail Account 



Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Water Department: 

Water Rates 

Water SeiT/'ices 

Water Installation Rates 

Industrial Fire Protection Rates 

Water Department Refunds 
Appropriation Refunds 

Veterans Aid, Settlements 

Veterans Aid, Reimbursements 
Refunds, Surplus Revenue 
Recording Fees 
Group Insurance Dividends 
Sale of Cemetery Lots 
Garter Lecture Fund, Reimbursement 
Peipetual Care Funds 

Sears, Cook, Walker Fund, Reimb\irsement 

Premium, Sale of Bonds 

Glen Acres Completion 

Corum Meadows Completion 

Tailings 



RESTRICTED RECEIPTS 



ii5i;, 766. 33 
2,658.91 
1,129.11 

I5,ii2l;.97 
230.36 

12,27i|.05 
535.71 



Short Term Investments 
Employees Dedactions : 

Federal Withholding 

State Withholding 

Retirement System, Town 

Teachers 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield 

U. S. Savings Bonds 

Group Insurance 

Washington National Insiirance 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 

Credit Union 

Union Dues 
Fish & Game Licenses for Commonwealth 
County Dog Licenses 
Lunch Food Tax, State 



AGENCY & TRUST FUNDS 



1,l89,0ii6.71 
352, 261;. 79 
1ii1,230.6ii 
236,Oii0.77 
88,601 .32 
1i;,l62.50 
1,823.^0 
7,966.62 
i|1,8i;1.l47 

528,303.50 
38,535.73 



114 



168,887.88 



111,680.27 



37U, 766.67 
3,783.29 
5,992.18 
23.367.17 

10,388.63 



i;7i;,209.68 
39,9ii0.31 

12,809.76 
2,2i;7.62 
I83.I42 
301;. 00 
6,897.00 
khl.lh 
6,800.00 
296.93 
229.81; 

14;, 780.89 
8,026.88 
1;,11U;.29 



12,800,000.00 



2,639,81 7. 1;5 
6,906.25 
5;5o8.75 
6i;3.83 



280,568.15 



ii07,909.31 



611,706.99 



15,ii52,876.28 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 



Schools, State Reimbursements 
Loss of Taxes, State 
Local Aid, Lottery Fund 
Elderly Affairs, State Reimbursement 
jovemor's Highway Safety Program 
totor Vehicle Excise Collections; 
Prior Levies 
Current Levies 
?arm Animal Excise 
3ewer Rentals 
imbulance Collections 
jiquor Licenses 
Interests & Costs; 
Short Term Investments 
Tax Collections 
Water Demands 

Tax Titles Interest & Costs 

Betterment Interest on Paid in full 

teicipal Receipts; 

Selectmen 

Tax Collector 

Town Clerk 

^olice Department 

iuilding Inspector; 

Building Permits 

Wire Pentd-ts 

Plumbing Permits 

Gas Permits 

iealer of Weights & Measiires 

ingineering Department 

lighway Department; 

Sale of Junk & Obsolete Equipment 

State Highway Project #U97 

State Highway, Chapter "81" 

Jemetery Department 

lealth & Sanitation; 

Board of Health 

Visiting Nurse Fees 

Sale of Dogs 

Drainlayer Permits 

Dog License Reimbursements 

iewer Inspection Fees 

ibrary Fines 

insurance Reimbursements 

'ourth District Court Fines 

)ivision of Standards, State 

idvertising Charges 

lablevision Fee 

.ents, Hamden Tavern 

lonservation Commission Hearings 

lew England Tel & Tel Commissions 



'OTAL RECEIPTS FOR PERIOD JULY 1, 1975 to JUlffi 30, 1976 



2,525,111 .39 
957. 7U 
82,308.90 
2,000.00 
998.50 

393,853.08 
210,650.97 



98,328.88 
22,676.32 
i;,l03.1iO 
2,700.12 
11 .52 

51i0.oo 
2,596.50 
5,93li.l;0 

11,32ii.00 
li,127.75 
1,213.00 
1,127.00 



ii55.oo 
iii,5oij..o6 
1;5,963.17 



3,167.50 
175.00 
2it8.00 
100.00 

3,259.92 



2,611,376.53 



6oi4,5oii.o5 
179.50 
70,735.71; 
14,681;. iiO 
7,000.00 



127,820.21; 



9,070.90 
2,500.00 



17,791 .75 

Ui8.00 
250.00 



87,922.23 
8,539.i;0 



6,950.i;2 
50.00 
560.25 
7,1U6.1;0 
5,227.39 
i;6.00 
61.25 
31 .00 
50I1.OO 
75oOO 

376 .111 



3,573,850.86 
$29,779,U65.30 



115 



DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENEEIAL ACCOUNTS 
ANALYSIS OF EXPENHETURES OTHER THAN THAT RAISED FROM 
APPROPRIATION FOR THE PERIOD 7/1/7$ - 6/30/76 



Refunds: 

Personal Property Taxes 

Real Estate Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

Tax Possessions 

Tax Title Recording Fees 

Street Betterments, Unapportioned 

Surplus Revenue 

Ambulance Accounts 

Estimated Receipts 

Water Department: 
Rates 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Water Services 
Assessments - State & County: 
County Tax 

County Retirement System 

State Recreation 

M. D. C. Sewer 

Motor Vehicles Excise Bills 

Metropolitan Air Pollution 

Metropolitan Area Planning Council 

M. B. T. A. 

Ipswich River Watershed District 

State Audit 
Legal Settlements 
Outside Detail: 

Police Department 

Maintenance Department 

Miscellaneous Departments 
Employee Deductions: 

Withholding - Federal 
State 

Retirement - Town En^jloyees 

School Teachers 
Group Insurance 

Washington National Insurance - Teachers 
U. S. Bonds 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield - Tovm Employees 

Teachers 

Tax Sheltered Annuities - Teachers 
Credit Union 
Union Dues : 

Town Elnployees 

Police Department 

Maintenance Department 

Teachers 

Fire Department 

Agency Accounts: 

CoTinty Dog Licenses 

State Fish & Game Licenses 

Recreation, Dedicated Accounts 

Lunch Food Tax 
Premium, Sale of Bonds 



383,23ii.89 

238,897.00 
H2,8itB.3l 

102,212.21 
1,739.10 
1,223.51 
2,565.30 

190,316.66 
389.98 
2,160.55 



1,7lii.00 
2,8U+.88 
3,05J^.OO 
29,0i;1 .85 
1,881 .00 



52.30 
11,ii11 .10 
11,838.13 
10.30 
173.1^2 
1,573.00 
310.00 
51;. 80 
6ii3.09 



32.1;0 
1,5lii.1ii 
8.25 



622,131 .e 



383, ii55. 62 



15,908.00 
6,599.67 
679.00 

1,l89,0ii6.71 
352,261^.79 
126,310.58 
232,257.08 
2,008 .5ii 
7,367.62 
1U,162 .50 
52, 351;. 07 
l;2,it11 .00 
35, 720. 1;1 
528,303.50 



38,535-73 



5,511.05 
6,906.25 
5,226.70 
57l;.36 



26,066. li 



1,551;. 7! 



1,005,587.51 
1,269 .6i 



23,186.65 



2,620, 7l;2 .5; 



18,218.36 
229. 8I4 



116 



DISBURSMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS 



federal Grants & Aids - Schools: 
Public Law #87ii 
lACP-World of Construction 
Consumer & Homeriaking 
Title I, Reading Skills 
Title II, Library Extensions 
Child Development, Kindergarten 
Head Start 

1 Service Leadership Training 
;hool Lunch Program 
Lgh School Athletic Association 
smetery Department: 
Trust Funds 
irter Lecture Fund 
rust Fund - Walker School 
Len Pines Completion 
3mporary loans 
lort Term Investments 

Total Expenditures from General Accounts 



9,U57.65 
Bo.iiO 
322.95 
96,188.90 
9,110.16 
8,120.67 
13,000.00 



136,280.73 
100.00 
369,051;. 60 
10,627.70 

6,800.00 
hhl.lh 
296.93 
8,200.00 
79,032.00 
11,800,000.00 

16,107,695-20 



AMLYSIS OF THE ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 
USED BY THE ASSESSORS IN SETTING THE 1 976 TAX RATE 
WITH THE ACTUAL 1975 RECEIPTS 



Used by the 
Assessors in 
Setting 1976 
Tax Rate 



Actual 
Receipts 
1975 



More 
Than 
Estimated 



Less 
than 
Estimated 



Motor Vehicles & Trailer Excise 

Licenses 

Fines 

Special Assessments 

General Government 

Protection of Persons & Property 

Bealth & Sanitation 

Highways 

Schools, Local Receipts 
Libraries, Local Receipts 

Cemeteries (Other than Tinist Funds & Sale of Lots) 
Interest 

Farm Animal Excise 
Ambulance Service 
Sewer Revenue 

Workmen's Comp. & Insurance Reimbursement 
Dog License Reimbursements 
Miscellaneous Receipts 
Matching Funds (C. D. Rescue Truck) 



1;89,639.52 


677,539.32 


187,899.80 


2,000.00 


11;, 000. 00 


12,000.00 


1,200.70 
23,962.89 


5,897.1t5 


1;, 696. 75 


28,396.75 


l;,i;33.86 


7,606.60 
21;, 131 .00 


7,61;0.25 


33.65 


2i;,298.25 


167.25 


1;,101 .00 


3,867.00 




i;22.i;1 


523.25 


100.81; 


2,760.00 






750.85 


205. i;6 




9,1ij.1 .00 


9, 353.1^0 


212.1;0 


126,930.83 
257.69 


128,379.86 
i;36.71 


1,U;9.03 


179.02 


ii,307.13 


ii,li23.25 


116.12 


53, 801;. 13 


59,856.87 


6,052.71; 


5,50l;.82 


8,181 .65 
3,li72.56 


2,676.83 


3,61;8.12 




983.86 


862.11; 




7,666.68 






768;B19.23 


977, 331;. 17 


220,010.29 



23l;.00 

2,760.00 



175.56 
121 .72 
7,666.68 
1^503.35 



117 



Cash 

Short Term Investments 
Petty Cash Advances 
Taxes Uncollected: 
Prior Levies 

Personal Property 1972 
1973 

1975 

Real Estate Taxes 1973 
1974 
1975 

Current Levies 

Personal Property 1976 
Real Estate Taxes 1976 
Personal Property Taxes 

in litigation 1969 
Real Estate Taxes 

in litigation 1973 
Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes: 
Prior Levies 
Levy 1971 
1972 
1973 
197li 
1975 

Current Levy, 1976 
Tax Titles & Possessions; 
Tax Titles 
Tax Possessions 
Assessments Added to Taxes; 
Street Assessments 1 97k 
1975 

Committed Interest 197U 
1975 

Water Assessments 19714- 
1975 

Committed Interest ^9^h 
1975 

Betterments in Litigation 
Assessments Street 1972 
Street 1973 
Committed Interest 1 973 
Unapportioned Assessments 
Street 
Water 
Sewer 

Accounts Receivables; 
Water Department: 
Rates 
Services 

Water Installations 
Fire Protection Rates 

Water Liens 1973 
197li 
1975 

Sewer Rates 
State Aid to Highways 
County Aid to Highways 
Ambulance Account 
Unprovided for Accoxmts: 
Overlay Deficits: 
Levy 1972 

1973 

197li 

1975 

1976 

Legal Settlemerts 
Underestimates - Assessments 
State Recreation Areas, 1976 
MDC Sewer Assessment, 1976 
Loans Authorized 
Revenue, 1977 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1976 



ASSETS 



2,126,166.92 

500,000.00 
575.00 



2,626, 7li1 .92 



163.80 
516.25 
81 .13 
169.50 
175.90 

75. 1U 

714,533.88 

5,150.1iO 
191.338.35 



75,715.60 



196,1488.75 
I462 .00 
908.60 



272,2014.35 



1,370.60 



273,5714.95 



825.61 
5,559.26 
19,587.20 
13,056.67 
28,965.35 



63.I47 
71 .62 
I42.92 
39.8I4 
118.92 
1408.75 
68.80 
198.61 

85.61 
55.80 
Ii2.1i0 



67,9914.09 
2l6,111|.6o 

143,983.81 
88,672.80 



217.85 



795 .08 



183.81 

50,575.58 
99,1408. 7li 
41,556.17 



281i, 108.69 
132,656.61 



1,196.71+ 



191, 5140. 1(9 



17.I42 
82U.95 
2.091 .14I 



145,123.57 
3,063.96 
22.85 
1,056.00 



2.933.78 



52,200.16 
1,597.21 
238,3148.314 
17,005.18 
9,329 .liO 



36.1iO 
1,867.32 
I407.76 
1,020.13 
60,698.72 6U,030.33 
1,269.66 

862.95 

14,171.28 70,3314.22 
7,097,000.00 
12,332,7140.00 



TOTAL ASSETS 



118 



$23.328.373.91 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1976 



LIABILITIES & RBSEKVES 



Temporary Loans: 

Anticipation of Bond Issue 

Anticipation of Reimbursement, Highway 
Outside Itetails; 

Police Department 

Maintenance Department 

Wilmington Housing Dept . 
Employee Payroll Deductions; 

Retirement System 

Teachers Retirement 

Group Insurance 

Washington National Insurance, Teachers 
Blue Cross/Blue Shield: Town 

Teachers 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 
Agency Accounts; 

County Dog Licenses 

§ale of Cemetery Lots 

State Food Tax 
Revolving Accounts; 

School Lunch 

High School Athletic Account 

Recreation Dedicated Accounts 
Group Insurance Dividend 
Federal Grants & Aids: 

Public Law f^H^-bbU 

Public Law #8?!; 

World of Construction 

Kindergarten Program 

NDEA PL 850 

EDEA Title IV-B 

Reading Skills, Title I 
State Aid to Public LibrajTies 
Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Tailings 

Overestijiiates, State & County Assessments; 

County Tax Assessment, 1976 

Metro .Air Pollution Control, 1976 

Mass. Bay Transit Authority, 1976 

Ipswich River Watershed Assessment, 1976 
Glen Pines Trust 
Corum Meadows Trust 
Revenue Reserved until collected; 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Special Assessments Revenue 

Departmental Revenue 

Tax Title Revenue 

Water Revenue 

Sewer Revenue 

State & County Aid to Highways Revenue 
Reserve for Petty Cash Advances 

Appropriation Balances; 
Town Treasurer 
Town Clerk 
Town Counsel 
Town Hall 
Planning Board 
Building Inspector 
Sidewalk Account 



100,000.00 
37,232.00 

182.00 
13.50 

15.00 

1U,920.06 
55,878.16 
315.20 

1,7i|0.8i; 

7,02ii.53 
12,6ii7.36 
10,380.87 

1,5ij.0.20 
6,896.80 
69.i;7 

68,60^.26 
1,178.55 
811.30 



87, 9i;3. 57 
1l6,5i;7.99 
29.79 
855.73 
21,910.07 
2,601 .78 
1,3U3.81; 



52,780.88 
ii38.08 
3,988.3U 
2,203.69 



28it,l08.ij.9 
192,661 .82 
9,3l7.iiO 
132,656.61 
52,368.76 
1,597.21 
215,097.77 
575.00 

17.35 
19.77 
3,750.00 
it33. 00 
2,2ii0.00 
2,530.00 
8,890.1|6 



137,232.00 



210.50 



102,907.02 



8,506 .i;7 



70,591;. 11 
30i|..00 



231,232.77 
6,1|13.75 
1,1it0.67 
it,1iUt.29 



59,1|10.99 
36,580.89 
8,026.88 



!,383.06 



119 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 

Appr opriation Ba lances : 
Public Street XigTits 
Drug Dependency Problems 
Lowell Memtal Health 
Mental Health Program 
Garbage Collection 
Veterans ' Aid 
School Department 
Local Growth Policy- 
Acquisition of Land for Sanitary Purposes 
Special Coixnsel 
Public Library 
Recreation Accoiint 

Chapter 90 Construction I967 9,000.00 

1968 9,000.00 

1969 9,1;50.00 
1971 637.23 
197U h(>U3.3h 

1975 3U, 20^.17 

1976 37,232.00 
Chapter 90 Maintenance, 1976 

Chapter 81 Maintenance, 1976 
Historical Commission 

Bicentennial Commission , 

Veterans Retirement 

Bonds & Insurance 

Outlay, Purchase of Bucket Hoist 

School Maintenance 

Alderwood Estates for Conservation 

Historical Preservation, Rounds Property 

Appraisals 

Cause and Solution, Dirty Water Problems 
Litigation-Multi-Family Dwellings 
1976 Salary Adjustments & Additional Costs 
Law Enforcement Assistance, Block Grant 
Engineering & Title Search, Town-owned land 
Layout, Industrial and Progress Way 
Accept as Town Way, Scaltrito Drive 
Civil Defense 
Non-Revenue Accounts: 

Acquire Land for School Purposes 
Wobum Street School Construction 
Wobum Street Addition 
Shawsheen Ave. School Construction 
Preliminary Plans new High School 
Vfest Intermediate School Construction 
Wilmington Memorial Library Construction 
Relocate Shawsheen Ave. Bridge 
Silver Lake Sewer System 
Water Betterments; 
Brattle Street 



Jaquith Road 
Lake Street 
OakwDod Road 
Street Betterments: 



818.77 
2,398.50 
178.80 
1^,952.75 



Ferguson Road " li, 876.68 

Lexington Street, etc. 10,i).22.87 
Morningside Drive 1;,395. 87 

Relocate Grove Ave. 
Esquire Estates Con^iletion 
Develop Salem St. Well Field 
Improvements to Water System 
Water listribution System, Northeast Sector 
Main Street Well Field 
Construct Pennanent Pumping Station, 

Town Park Well Field 
Wiljnington Redevelopment Authority 
Acquire Land, Town Forest 
Loans Authorized & Unissued 
Appropriation Control, 1977 
Water Available Surplus 
Surplus Revenue 



1U,663.76 
1,083.33 
208.37 
1,838 .50 
5,808.62 
2,000.00 
165,51*0.25 
16.50 
5,550.00 
2,786.90 
252. ii5 

1,530.00 



101,l66.7ii 
11,500.00 
3,329.71 
2,517.1+0 
2,83l|.0U 
1,919.80 
1,U75.95 
1,063.00 
7,000.00 
18,789.89 
1,303.00 
3,600.00 
2,228.60 
20,000.00 
li,902.79 
3,1+19.75 
ii,896.38 

Uoo.oo 

1 00 .00 
2,1+73.85 

2,815.53 
3,339.19 
9,156.61 

1+3,938.11+ 
3,000,00 
9,71+7.22 

1+0,1+10.1+1 
3,000.00 

62,787.27 



8,31+8.82 



19,695.1+2 
9,051+. 01 
2,721 .28 
1+5,1+38.59 
6,09l+.09 
259,755.51+ 
2,1+1+9.89 

11+,152.97 
17,768.88 
169,000.00 



1+11+,080.16 



732,673.86 
6,997,000.00 
12,921,961i.00 
85,853.51 
621,711+.98 



TOTAL LIABILrriES & RESERVES 



120 



$23,328,373.91 



ANALYSIS OF THE MTURIEG DEBT 





Balances 


Added 


Paid-Off 


Balances 




7A/75 


1 975/76 


1 975/76 


6/30/76 


INSIDE THE DEBT LIMIT 










Wilmington Memorial Library 


310,000 




25,000 


285,000 


G/L Uk, Sec. 10 $Uo5,000 








Land Acq. Town Forest (1975) 




169,000 




169,000 


G/L Lik, Sec. 10 $169,000 






West Street Construction Bonds 


6,900 




6, 900 


-0- 


u/Li UU, iDec . lu >p J 1 uu 










Sewer Main Bonds (1971) 


215,000 




15,000 


200,000 


G/L UU, Sec. 10 $275,000 






bewer Maxn rsonds \'7(3) 


r\r\r\ 

i:30,000 




1 c' r\r\r\ 
1 p jUUU 




G/L UU, Sec. 10 $^;oij.,000 






Street Construction Bonds (19(1) 


12,901 




12,901 


-U- 


G/L ijil. Sec. 10 $ 6U,505 








Urban Renewal Bonds (1971) 


114.0,000 




r\ r\r\r\ 

20,000 


1 r\r\r\ 

1 ^0^000 


G/L 21 2B Sec. 20 $200,000 








Acqiiire Land School Purposes (1972) 


37,080 






dU, ko 


G/L Uii, Sec. 10 $ 6l,800 










Street Construction Bonds (197^/75) 


68,210 ■ 




13,642 


5i;,568 


GA illi. Sec. 10 $ 68,210 












1 ,020,091 


169,000 


1 20,003 


1 ,0oo,2oo 


OUTSIDE THE DEBT LIMIT 










Add. & Alter. Jr./Sr. High School 


35,000 




30,000 


5,000 


Acts Di|.5/Uo, $1,375,000 




Add. &: Alter. Jr./Sr. High School 


60,000 




20,000 


140,000 


Acts 61i5/lj,8, $ U00,000 








Glen Road School 


60,000 




20,000 


140,000 


Acts 6I45/U0, $ u50,000 








Boutwell Street School 


100,000 




20,000 


80,000 


Acts 6U5/Uo, $ U00,000 








275,000 


North Intermediate School 


330,000 




55,000 


Acts ^\6/h^, $1,050,000 








Various School Projects 


0,000 




5,000 




Acts olo/hfi, $ 00,425 








Woburn Street School 


262,000 




30,000 




ft rt-i- r-. ^l.c* /l.Q d* c'o'7 r\r\r\ 

Actis ^ py^^uuu 






35,000 


'i\,rf r\AA 


Woburn Street School Addition 


380,000 




Acts 6ij5A8, $ 660,000 




o^p ^UUU 


West Intermediate School 


095,000 




ICS r\r\r\ 
f U,UUU 


Acts 6U5Ao, $1 ,i4i;5, 000 








(-11 1 A 1 T 

Shawsheen Avenue School 


990,000 




1 IU,UUU 


ft fin nnn 
oou ^ uuu 


Acts 6145/48, $1,671;, 720 




5,000 


145,000 


Shawsheen Ave. School (2nd Issue) 


50,000 




Acts 61i5/J48, $ 100,000 
Water Main Bonds (I962) 








15,000 




5,000 


10,000 


Chp. lii;. Sec. 8, $86,000 








150,000 


Water Main Bonds, New Well Field 


180,000 




30,000 


Chp. \\h,. Sec. 8, $i;63,529 






180,000 


Salem Street Irfell Field & Mains 


200,000 




20,000 


Chp. lUi, Sec. 8, $320,000 
Water Main Bonds (197U/75) 






2,388 


9,552 


11,9U0 




Chp. UU, Sec. 8, $11,9li0 






35,000 


1465,000 


Improv. System N. E. Sector 


500,000 




Chp. \x\x, Sec. 8, $500,000 












3,876,9i;0 




li92,3BH 


3,3Bi4,552 


COMBINED TOTALS 


U, 897, 031 


169,000 


613,191 


U,ii52,8l40 



121 



REPORT OF DEPABTMENTAL EXPENDITURES FOR FISCAL 1976 



SELECTMEN 
Salaries 

Printing Adv. & Binding 
Misc. Services 
Town Meeting Expenses 
Supplies Office 



2,151 .$0 
1,9ii2.9U 
3,138.10 
827.50 
133.88 

a, 193 .92 



TOW COLLECTOR 

Salary Town Collector 
Salaries Other 
Printing Adv. & Binding 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Supplies Office 



13,257.32 
10,122.81; 

771 .61 
3,817.96 

521 .86 
2«,U91.59 



ELECTIONS 
Salaries 

Misc . Contractual Services 
Supplies Office 



TOW CLERK 
6,000.00 Salary Town Clerk 

7,669.00 Salaries Other 

671 .95 Printing Adv. & Binding 

1i4,3i|0.95 Misc. Contr. Services 

Supplies Office 



13,622.23 
10,i;l7.58 
109.58 
226.06 
161;. 81 
21;,5U0.26 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 
Salaries 

Misc. Contr. Services 
Printing Adv. & Binding 
Supplies Office 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
1,597.00 Salary Principal Assessor 

5,168.90 Salaries Other 

988.37 Printing Adv. & Binding 

3I1.UO Misc. Contr. Services 

7,788.67 Supplies Office 



21,598.76 
16,900.57 
U2.00 
2,5i;8.12 
U08.88 
U1,U9«.33 



FINANCE COMMrrTEE 
Salaries 

Printing Adv. & Binding 
Misc. Contr. Service 
Supplies Office 



390. U9 
2,iiU8.87 

i;20.21 
7i;.6l 
3,33U.18 



T01/JN COUNSEL 

Personal Services 
Contr. Services 



10,000.00 
3,750.00 
'13,750.00 



TOW MANAGER 

Salary Town Manager 
Salaries Other 
Printing Adv. & Binding 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Supplies Office 



28,581.58 
26,i|3ii.58 

173.00 
2,56i;.00 

391 .86 
58,1^5.02 



TOWN HALL 
Salaries 

Misc. Contr. Services 
Postage 

Data Processing Payrolls 
Supplies Office 



iii,5i;5.o5 
ii,l|i;2.6l 
5,273.06 
6,222.00 
3,628.23 

31;, no. 95 



TOWN ACCOUNTAOT 

Salary Town Accountant 
Salaries Other 
Misc. Services 
Supplies Office 



17,556.20 
10,712.32 
UO.76 
U98.85 
28,808.13 



PLANNING BOARD 
Salaries 

Professional Services 
Misc. Services 
Supplies Office 



885.50 
10,571 .00 
2,808.58 

137. 1|0 
1U,U02.i;» 



TOWN TREASURER 

Salary Administrative Asst , 

Salaries Other 

Repairs & Maintenance 

Misc. Contr. Services 

Supplies Office 

Tax Title Foreclosures 



11;,765.39 
10,122.81; 
h9.hk 
306.09 
1,1^146.50 
6,100.67 
32,790.93 



122 



REPORT OF DEPARTMENTAL EXPEmiTUILES FOR FISCAL 1976 



LICE DEPARTMENT 
Salary Chief 
Salary Lieutenant 
Salaries Sergeants 
Salaries Patrolmen 
Salaries Traffic Supervisors 
Salaries Clerks 
Salaries Sick Leave 
Salaries Extra Help 
Salaries Vacations 
Salaries Paid Holidays 
Salaries Specialists 
Police Dog Officers 
Subs. Dues &Misc. Services 
Maint . of Dogs 
Clothing & Rubber Goods 
Supplies Office 
Supplies Sm. Tools & Equip. 
Outlay 



RE DEPARTMEm' 
Salary Chief 
Salary Deputy Chief 
Salaries Lieutenants 
Salaries Privates 
Salaries Call Fire & Ambulance 
Salaries Vacation 
Salaries Sick Leave 
Salaries Paid Holidays 
Fire Alarm Maint . 
Repairs Radio 
Misc. Services 
Clothing & Rubber Goods 
Supplies Office 
Small Tools & Equipment 
Fire Alarm Ext. & Outlay 



28,028.33 
17,797.89 
85,968.83 
315,758.37 
ii1,980.22 
17,iiOi;.52 
26,500.00 
32,000.00 
35,000.00 
I6,i;86.00 
3,600.00 
800.00 
912.66 
999.57 
12,883.U5 
2,181 .38 
2,027.05 
998.50 
6M,326.77 



28,028.33 
18,628.55 
6o,59U.27 
303,196.88 
17,000.00 
31,719.i;9 
21,000.00 
111, 702. 00 
1,9l;8.ii6 
531 .21 
888.17 
7,089.55 
232.16 
3,676. i;8 
6,767.67 
516,003.22 



DOG OFFICER 
Salary 

Misc. Services 
Outlay 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Salary Building Inspector 
Salaries Other 
Printing Adv. & Binding 
Dues & Subscriptions 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Supplies Office 
Outlay 



BOARD OF APPEALS 
Salary 

Misc. Services 
Supplies Office 



SEALER OF WEICTITS & MEASURES 
Salary 

Small Tools & Equipment 



TOW ENGINEER 

Salary Town Engineer 
Salaries Others 
Misc. Contr. Serv. 
Supplies, Office 
Small Tools & Equip. 



3,8U0.0O 
2,308.05 

6,U03.02 



I5,309.5ii 
9,U16.15 
I89.OO 
1 73. 9ii 
537.79 
202.21 
2i;0.00 

26,06«.63 



898.92 
15.00 
2i;5.00 
1,158.92 



1,375.00 
38.1;0 

1,iil3.U0 



21,500.52 

1;1;,U75.61 

387.78 

326.33 
385.26 
67,075.50 



yiL DEFENSE 
Salary 

Misc. Services 
Utilities 

Schooling S.C.U.B.A. 
Transportation 
Supplies Office 
Small Tools & Equipment 
Outlay Equipment 



1,500.00 
635. 6ii 
22^.22 
70.00 
19.80 
11 .05 
378.37 
753.86 



)NSTABLE 

Salary 100.00 



123 



REPORT OF DEPARTMENTAL EXPENDITURES FOR FIBGAL 1976 



HKHVIAY DEPARTMENT 

Salary Superinte ndent 
Salaries & Wages Others 
Repairs & Maint , Police Dept . 
Repairs & Maint . Fire Dept . 
Repairs & Maint . Engineering 
Repairs & Maint . Tree Dept . 
Repairs & Maint. Cemetery Dept. 
Repairs & Maint. Public Bldg. 
Repairs & Maint. Assessors 
Repairs & Maint. Recreation 
Repairs & Maint . Building Insp. 
Repairs & Maint . Board of Health 
Repairs & Maint . Nurse 
Misc. Contr. Services 



Police 
Fire 
Engineer 
Tree Dept. 
Cemetery Dept. 
Public Bldg. 
Assessor 
Recreation 
Building Insp. 
Board of Health 
Nurse 



Gasoline & Oil 
Gasoline & Oil 
Gasoline & Oil 
Gasoline & Oil 
Gasoline & Oil 
Gasoline & Oil 
Gasoline & Oil 
Gasoline & Oil 
Gasoline & Oil 
Gasoline & Oil 
Gasoline & Oil 
Clothing & Rubber Goods 
Supplies Construction 
Supplies Office 
Small Tools & Equipment 
Outlay 
Sidewalks 
Drainage 



ROAD MACHINHIY 

Repairs & Maint. 
Gasoline & Oil 



CHAPTER 90 

Uonstruction 1972- Supplies 
Construction 1973/7i+ - Supplies 
Constmction I9lh/1^ - Expenses 



CHAPTER 81 
Salaries 

Supplies Constnaction 



19,993.06 
207,350.77 
9,537 .ii7 
i;, 227. 12 
77.66 
1,561j..20 
2,563.77 
781 .57 
93.86 
1i;0.20 
69.69 
325.11 
51 .U5 
12,31ii.13 
2i;,170.90 
3,385.13 
561 .k2 
1,752.iiO 
1,035.67 
3,U02.96 
581 .28 
7U8 .08 
292.00 
308.00 
300.00 
693 .60 
50,028.75 
168.91 
18,718.55 
3,832.55 
6ii,850.0ii 
25,000.00 
I45B, 920.30 



21,289.11 
17.710.82 
38,999.93 



37,800.00 
36,060.66 
12,i^77.83 
86,338.U9 



5,602.98 

3it, 299.31 
39,902.29 



SNOW & ICE CONTROL 
Salaries 

Repairs & Maint . 
Misc. Contr. Service 
Gasoline & Oil 
Salt & Sand 
Out lay 



TREE WARDEN 
Salaries 

Misc. Contr. Services 

Chemicals 

Trees 

Small Tools & Equipment 



DUTCH ELM CONTROL 
Salaries 
Chemicals 

Small Tools & Equip. 



GYPSY MOTH CONTROL 
Salaries 
Chemicals 

Small Tools & Equipment 



PUBLIC STREET LIGHTS 



INSTALLATION OF TRAFFIC LIGHTS 



PARK DEPARTMENT 
Salaries 

Maint . & Supplies 



CEMCTERY DEPARTMENT 
Salary Superintendent 
Salaries Other 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Liners 

Supplies Care of Grounds 
Supplies Construction 
Supplies Office 
Small Tools & Equipment 
Outlay Equipment 



57,673.31 
U,9U9.85 

26,191 .13 
9,3i;3.1^ 

37,511.06 
U,i;97.00 
lU0,165.a9 



2li,371.5^ 
825.20 
2,982.05 
2,bl .00 
826.93 
31,U36.72 



16,960.00 
2,228.75 
363.70 
19,552. 1;5 



11,87^.00 
2,000.00 
9.96 
13,BB3.% 

92,288.22 
15,000.00 



ii,560.03 
999.30 
5,5"^9.35 



iii,53ii.5o 
50,032.56 

12,918.31 
910.00 
1,1;02.32 
2,81+0.57 
370.38 
568.08 
2,389.95 
b5,966.67 



124 



REPORT OF DEPARmENIAL EXPENDITURES FOR FISCAL I976 



IkTm DEPARTMENT 



SCHOOL MAINTENANCE 



SaJ-ctries & Ws-gss 


166,901 .lii 


Salary Superintendent 


17 811 J]9 
538,808.92 


Repairs St Maintenance 


12,715.65 
56,687.29 


Salaries Others 


Misc. Contr. Services 


Repairs & Maintenance 


19,998.39 


Public Utilities 


50,31U.03 


Misc. Contr. Services 


29,001 .61 
15,000.00 


Transportation 


550 .00 


Vandalism 


Gasoline & Oil 


9,975.08 


Rubbish 


9,000.00 


Meters & Meter Parts 


10,71ii.0U 
21,850.96 


Uniforms 


10,000.00 


Pipes & Fittings 


Kitchen Repairs 


7,000.00 
139,33U.i;8 


Supplies Construction 


2,895.52 


Fuel Heating 


Supplies Office 


7,925.63 


Oil Burner Repairs 


8,665.52 


Supplies Plant 


5,392.71; 


Supplies Plant 


3k, 929.76 


Outlay, Equipment 


6,301 .50 


Small Tools & Equipment 


570. 2U 


Water P\irchase/Town of Burlington 


2,007.96 
27,032.38 
381,263.92 


Roof Repairs 


36,717.25 


Water Mains Lake St. Bridge 


Outlay 


2U, 996.91 
b91,83U.57 



iOARD OF HEALTH 
Salary Director 
Salaries Others 
Printing Adv. & Binding 
Clinic Expenses 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Supplies Office 
Hospital & Medical 
Drug Dependency Problems 
Lowell Mental Health 
Mental Health 
Garbage Collection 
Town Dump 



18,203.86 
38,262.66 
108.00 
959.23 
230 .80 
U69.I2 
1,166.97 
11,916.63 
2,291.63 
1^,026.53 
35,000.00 
60,000.00 

102,635 .ii3 



SCHOOL GROUNDS MAINTENAJJCE 
Repairs & Maintenance 
Supplies Care of Grounds 
Small Tools & Equipment 
Outlay 



MAINTENANCE OF TOWN BUILDINGS 
Repairs & Maintenance 
Public Utilities 
Outlay 



2,000.00 
7,000.00 
300.00 
9,822.20 
19,122.20 



6,000.00 

65,000.00 

3,000.00 
7U,000.00 



?ETERANS BENEFITS 
Salaiy Agent 
Salary Other 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Supplies Office 
Veterans ' Aid 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 



Salaries 
Expenses 



VOCATIONAL TRAINING 
Tuition 

Transportation 



2,600.00 
8,03U.30 
180.00 
lil .10 
25,265.77 
36,121 .17 



5,1 86,097 .ii3 
1,097,720.97 
6;283,Bl8.i;0 



5,069.50 
366.25 
5,U35.75 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 
Salary Director 
Salary Others 
Misc. Services 

Library Programs & Activities 
Books & Supplies Library 
Supplies Office 
Outlay 

Bicentennial Room 



RECREATION 

Salary Director 
Salaries Others 
Misc. Services 
Community Youth Program 
Supplies Office 
Supplies Playgound & Beach 



17,296.ii7 
85,751.91 
971; .93 
1;38.65 
53,000.62 
8,093.20 
l;,i;13.22 
9,021 .69 
170,990.69 



16,526.16 
68,780.91; 
8,586.81 
16,112. ii7 
511 .67 
6,057.96 
116,576.01 



125 



REPORT OF DEPARTMEKTAL EXPENDITURES FOR FISCAL 1976 



PHMANEM* BUILDING COMMITTEE 
Salary 
Expenses 
Contr. Services 



BEAUTIFICATION CCMMITTEE 
Contr. Services 
Supplies 
Outlay 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
Personal Services 
Professional Services 
Historical Programs 
Supplies Office 
Misc. Material 
Harnden Tavern 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Salary 

Dues & Subscriptions 
Engineering Services 
Junior Conservation Camp 
Trees & Shrubs 
Supplies Office 
Misc. Material 



COUNCIL ON AGING 
Personal Services 
Misc. Contr. Services 
Supplies Office 



UNCLASSIFIED 
Reserve Fond 
Bonds & Insurance: 
Fire Insurance 

Workmens Comp. & Gen. Liab./& 

Accident Fire & Police 
Bonds 

Auto Liability 
Fire & Theft Auto 
Insurance Other 
Consultant Services 
Medical Payments 
Sewer Maintenance 



UNCLASSIFIED (continued) 



1,253.00 


Town Report 


1,873.90 


lii.55 


Local Transportation: 


33,000.00 


Selectmen 


900.00 


3i;,267.55 


Asst. Town Manager 


1G3.55 




Accountant 


57.00 




Treasurer 


U1.50 




Collector 


87.70 


775.26 


Town Clerk 


29.50 


17.28 


Planning Board 


232.25 


200.00 


Police Chief 


600.00 


992 .5h 


Traffic Supervisor 


180.00 




Dog Officer 


1,110.90 
673.50 




Cemeteiy 




Board of Health 






Board 


183.18 


25.00 


Nurses 


539.10 




Veterans ' Agent 


529.10 


85.32 


Public Buildings 


28.00 


220.55 


Library 


355.96 


700.00 


Recreation 


167.75 


1,519.66 


Building Inspector 


I08.0ii 




Misc . 


18.50 




Training & Conferences (In State): 






Selectmen 


577 .ijO 


1,000 .00 


Town Manager 


235.85 


136.8U 


Asst . Town Manager 


217.60 


iji;5.00 


Town Accountant 


321 .iiO 


305.25 


Town Treasurer 


Uo.oo 


208.92 


Town Collector 


U5.i;0 


68.12 


Town Clerk 


172.12 


iiU3.30 


Assessor 


670.00 


2,607 .it3 


Planning & M.A.P.C. 


178.65 




Police Ifept. 


81 .00 




Police Chief 




Others 


293.83 


9,8li;.50 


Fire Dept. 


56.00 


7,192.65 


Fire Chief 


50.00 


Deputy Chief 


21 .00 


17,057.15 


Fire School 


li,ii90.89 




Building Inspector 


IOU.OO 




Board of Health 


197.75 




Veterans' Agent 


90.00 


U6,l88.i;6 


Public Buildings 


273.25 


i|1,ii82.6o 


Library 


12l;.90 


Recreation 


219.71; 




Misc . 


1;6.00 


65,719.00 


Training & Conferences (Out of State) : 




ii22.75 


Town Manager 


810.00 


16,238.00 


Asst. Town Manager 


88.00 


U09.OO 


Town Clerk 


100.00 


566.00 


Town Treasurer 


375.00 


It, 575 .00 


Assessor 


300.00 


32 .50 


Public Buildings 


ii25.(XD 


363.17 


Library 


8ii.75 




Recreation 


120.05 




Leasing of Quarters 


1,500.00 




Contributory Group 


273,625.32 




Life and Health Insurance 



126 



REPORT OF DEPARTMENTAL EXPENDITURES FOR FISCAL 1976 



NCLASSIFIED (Continued) 



MemoricLL &: Veterans Day 


1,987.25 


Alderwood Estates Conservation 




Section 


1 .73ii.OO 






AllLUJ vox UUiCCO 1 


1 Jj8o 3ii 


Oiitl PiM Pn1 n rp Vphi c~\ 

WU.'-'-LCty X \^-l--L.V'^ W i. 1 -I- V-" J- \^ 


23 I1O6.OO 


Outlay Fire Dept . 


All QQO 70 


1 nnn Tt P M Piim-npr 


Oiitn Hi plrwav T)i]TiTn Tt^ioIc 


13 976.00 


riiTf""! a'^r T-Tn crViTATaTr TV*nr»lr 






10 000.00 

1 W« Www aWW 


ULtOXdy nXgllWcl^ Oa.IJ.U.cX DUU,^ 










?^ 7?)i 


uuT-'Xay uemeoery oud ipacuop 




Ul-lO-Lciy UOUIiOXJ- oil iigJ_lig 




1 K Pa Q Q oTi crf=^T* a+"."i TaIq cm n 

X CLoO Cii-gCX O CL U _LU 1 1 UVCLgjVjli 


A D'^'i 30 


PpcrinTi?}'! p^^t". i oTi^^ ~1 .Sr'Vinn'l 


c^lA 099.00 


Compensate Einployees Unused. Sick Leave 


1 5 060. 00 


1 91h/lS Salary Adj . & Addl . Cost 


231,5^2.1^6 


Additional Bnployees 


U^ooo.oo 


Police Dept. 




Career Incentive Pay 


7,200.00 


Fire Dept. 




Career Incentive Pay 


2,500.00 


Local Growth Policy Committee 


255.80 


Fire /Water Rescue Equipment 


193.00 


Engineering Studies 




Addtl. Land Fill Sites 


2,768.63 


Veterans Retirement 


I8,i|19.i4i; 


Special Counsel 


1,500.00 


Bicentennial Commission 


ii,9i49.75 



UNCLASSIFIED (Continued) 




XjCLW XjJ.i-Lk^X WOlliWilLf XXO _LO UCLliwC 




J_J_nJwJ^. ^jx diiu 


1 fCOKj .tip 


Tiavmit Honk""! n*^ Stipppl". 

xj w IX <^ X 1 w Kf x\-x 110 W L/ X W w u 


? 7Afi nn 


XjcL^ULLO wlitJo OliU OOXocJO 


pu .uu 




1 n9li no 




1 )i?A Pc;? )jA 


MA TTTR TMn "HTTRT TTiFPTTRTT^^'P 
rlilJ. Uit-LlMLl JJiliDx c£ J_l>Jl iliruIInJl 








Llclltix d± LIU V t-X IlillcIlU 


1 up J 040 .uu 


Water 




Sewer 




XiiOcx CO U Oil iiJlO XO-LpdOlOIl iMO Oeb cSt 




Authentication Fees 


0, 1 60 .1 1 




017,195 .52 






Sewer Construction Grants 


1 /^O '~?c^ r\ '~?Q. 

102,7^0.70 


S il ve r L ake Sewer Sys t em 


Jf,^ '2. ^'3 


Water Distribution System 




rjoroneaso oecuor 01 lown 


70 nfi[^ 70 
1 7,001? . 


Street Betterments 




Lexington & Cunningham Sts . 


1,580.95 


Morningside Drive 


1,588.00 


Iflfest Street 


2,172.87 


Wilmington Redevelopment Authority 




Eames St. Industrial Park 


6,017.53 


Tennis Courts 




Glen Road School 


119.1^2 


Wildwood St . School 


1;02.01 


Wobum St. School 


1,300.77 


Installation of Street Lights 




Shawsheen St . School 


1,126.51 


North Intermediate School 


1,322.38 




23U,679.7U 




i 



TRUST FUND ACCOUNTS 6130/16 



Balances 
6/30/75 



Withdrawn 
1975/1976 



Interest 
Added 



Trusts 
Added 



Balances 
6/30/76 



Principal 
Held In 
Trust 



Cemetery Trust Funds 
Andover Savings Bank 
Reading Co-Operative Bank 
Reading Savings Bank 



2,531.85 
16,987.80 
26,809.48 



21.15 
863.29 
1,891.99 



6,800.00 



2,553.00 
24,651.09 
28,701.47 



2,175.0C 
23,125.0C 
20,AOO.OC 



S.D.J. Carter Lecture Fund 

Reading Savings Bank 

Woburn Five Cent Savings Bank 

Burnap Library Fund 
Andover Savings Bank 

Benjamin Buck Library Fund 
Andover Savings Bank 

Charlotte C. Smith Library Fund 
Reading Savings Bank 

Sears Cook Walker-Walker 

Sc hool Fun d 

Reading Savings Bank 

Chester M. Clark Library Fund 
Reading Savings Bank 



5,349.35 
2,433.01 



317.97 



795.35 



886.52 



589.38 



896.73 



447.74 



296.93 



386.77 
25.66 



6.97 



17.50 



58.87 



32.20 



59.44 



5,288.38 
2,458.67 



324.94 



812.85 



945.39 



324.65 



956.17 



4,578.5C 
2,OOO.0( 



200. 0( 



500. 0( 



500. 0( 



257. OC 



500. OC 



Sabra Carter Common Fund 
Andover Savings Bank 

East Wilmington Improvement 
Association Library Fund 
Reading Savings Bank 



293.08 



6,695.32 
64,585.84 



744.67 



5.49 



445.84 
3,815.17 



6,800.00 



298.57 



7,141.16 
74,456.34 



200. OC 



3,820.00 
51 .455.50 



Conservation Commission 
Reading Savings Bank 



1,953.70 



106.77 



2,060.47 



2,500.00 





Computing new Water Rates at the Water Commissioners' Meeting 

Q 128 

2544 1 



WILMINGTON MEMORIAL LIBRARY 




3 2136 00199 7687 



For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room